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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I have just relocated to CDMX (from Chile) and pretty much all our appliances (TV´s, stereo, kettle etc...) have the plugs with 2 round pins and are 220v. I have seen converters which cost around 550 pesos each. Is this the only solution or is there a cheaper way to convert? (given that I will probably need around 20 or so...).

Thanks for your help!
 

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I went through the same things years ago when I went from France to the US and there is no other way to do it, buy converters or Mexican appliances...
 

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I think it's not quite as bad a problem as it used to be.

For computers and many TVs or anything digital with a built-in transformer/power supply or power brick with a detachable cord like this there is a good chance the power supply is capable of accepting multiple voltages as input, and all you need is a 120v power cord.

There should be a label on the power supply with all kinds of symbols and text, and it says on there what the accepted inputs (and provided outputs are). For example, the brick for my laptop has a line saying "Input: 100-240v ~ 4.4 A 50-60Hz." (there's more to it, but I left out the characters in Chinese which probably just mean "input").

Mexico standard power is 127 volts and 60 Hz, according to https://www.power-plugs-sockets.com/mexico/. That was news to me, I thought it was 120v like USA. But what's 7 volts between neighbors?

Most digital electronics made in Asia for the world market are designed to work all over the world. They ship the same TV everywhere and all they have to do is put it in a box with the right language printed on it and drop in the right power cord for that country, affix a couple of country-specific stickers to meet local labeling laws and they're good to import into that country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@ Citali: Many thanks for your reply - what I thought but was hoping for a less costly solution - merci!

@ Eastwind: Will try the power cord option - thanks for the suggestion!
 

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I think there is a switch or jumper wires to change voltages on electronics inside the unit. If you plug a 120v. device into a 220v socket it will more than likely ruin it. If you plug a 220v device into a 120v socket it probably won´t come on.
 

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Good point, I forgot about that. Here's a picture: https://www.lifewire.com/power-supply-voltage-switch-2625973.
In this picture the red sticker is covering the hole where the IEC320 C13 power cord plug goes in (because they want to make sure you set the slider correctly before you plug it in).

It depends somewhat on the age of the equipment. The oldest stuff won't be voltage-switchable at all. Older stuff may have a slider, and newer stuff will have automatic switching.

The alternate-cord solution only applies to digital electronics, where there is a power supply converting wall current to 12v, 5v or 3.3v needed by the electronics. For small heat-using appliances like hairdryers, toasters, coffee pots, etc it doesn't apply, and the cheapest route is to sell or give away your current one, not paying to move it, and buy a new one in Mexico at walmart.

A super-cheap clock radio might have been made without voltage-sensing circuitry to shave a couple centavos off the manufacturing price, and even though it's fully digital you'd need a converter. But again, that's one where it's cheaper to just buy another at walmart or somewhere equivalent.
 

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Hi

I have just relocated to CDMX (from Chile) and pretty much all our appliances (TV´s, stereo, kettle etc...) have the plugs with 2 round pins and are 220v. I have seen converters which cost around 550 pesos each. Is this the only solution or is there a cheaper way to convert? (given that I will probably need around 20 or so...).

Thanks for your help!
Our goto place for anything to do with electrical is Alcione.
Alcione "Tu aliado en material eléctrico"
There are 3 outlets in Mexico City scattered about.

Both the previous two owners of our house were from Europe. Our house has both 120 and 220 wall plugs scattered about - particularly in the kitchen.

If you google "QZ5025S bticino" you will find a link to a PDF file describing ours which are sold by Alcione. I'm not sure of cost but they can't be anywhere near 550 pesos.
Here's a link which will pull down the PDF.
www.bticino.com.mx/index.php?id=2507

(We have also asked Alcione to recommend capable electricians in the past. The people they gave us were very capable).
 
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