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Hi!

I'm 23 years old and currently living in Boston, MA. I've been to France twice. My girlfriend is student and a native of France and has an apartment there. I have $10,000 and what seems to be like just a dream to live with her. I'll do whatever it takes. Legally or by other means. my goal is 5 months. From what I have researched so far the only way for me to live and stay in France for up to a year is with a "long stay non professional visa" I'm not a student and i work for a living at the moment. When i leave in 5 months I'll be leaving my job and taking money with me to help support us. I'm lost on a few point's though, the Boston Consulate website says:

1.Financial guarantee such as (+2 copies):
. a letter from your bank stating that you have sufficient means of support to live in France, plus your last bank statement or your three last bank statements,


Is $10,000 sufficient? When I'm with my girlfriend we'll be splitting rent which is about 400 Euro a month, so I'm wondering if 10,000 is enough for me to survive for at least a year without a job.


2.a note, dated and signed by the applicant, stating that he/she does not intend to have in France a paid professional activity which requires a work permit (+2 copies),


Even though the visa is for non-professional use, will i be able to get a job at any point? what about under the table? i hear it's a rarity, but i won't count it out. If i am able to get a job through a company, does that forfeit my visa for a working visa since my visa is for non-professional use? Or If i got a job through a company and they hired me would i have to be in my home country to get it or could i be done while being in France? Most sites state i have to be in my home country before i am in France to qualify for a work permit visa. WOW this is overwhelming!

3.a notarized declaration of your sponsor stating that he/she will be responsible for all your expenses and a proof of his/her assets,

Who is my sponsor supposed to be? My girlfriends parents said they will help me with anything i needed. Are they looking for a french sponsor or someone in my immediate family here in America?

Last but not least!
4. Deed of your house/apartment in France (+2 copies)

Seeing as i don't own property or rent in France is there anyway around this? Or could i possibly show her apartment as where i am living?

Thanks so much for taking time to read this and leave comments and suggestions!
Every little bit helps and i'm happy to hear anyone's and everyone's feedback. All feedback is very much appreciated thanks again!
 

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Hi!

I'm 23 years old and currently living in Boston, MA. I've been to France twice. My girlfriend is student and a native of France and has an apartment there. I have $10,000 and what seems to be like just a dream to live with her. I'll do whatever it takes. Legally or by other means. my goal is 5 months. From what I have researched so far the only way for me to live and stay in France for up to a year is with a "long stay non professional visa" I'm not a student and i work for a living at the moment. When i leave in 5 months I'll be leaving my job and taking money with me to help support us. I'm lost on a few point's though, the Boston Consulate website says:

1.Financial guarantee such as (+2 copies):
. a letter from your bank stating that you have sufficient means of support to live in France, plus your last bank statement or your three last bank statements,


Is $10,000 sufficient? When I'm with my girlfriend we'll be splitting rent which is about 400 Euro a month, so I'm wondering if 10,000 is enough for me to survive for at least a year without a job.


2.a note, dated and signed by the applicant, stating that he/she does not intend to have in France a paid professional activity which requires a work permit (+2 copies),


Even though the visa is for non-professional use, will i be able to get a job at any point? what about under the table? i hear it's a rarity, but i won't count it out. If i am able to get a job through a company, does that forfeit my visa for a working visa since my visa is for non-professional use? Or If i got a job through a company and they hired me would i have to be in my home country to get it or could i be done while being in France? Most sites state i have to be in my home country before i am in France to qualify for a work permit visa. WOW this is overwhelming!

3.a notarized declaration of your sponsor stating that he/she will be responsible for all your expenses and a proof of his/her assets,

Who is my sponsor supposed to be? My girlfriends parents said they will help me with anything i needed. Are they looking for a french sponsor or someone in my immediate family here in America?

Last but not least!
4. Deed of your house/apartment in France (+2 copies)

Seeing as i don't own property or rent in France is there anyway around this? Or could i possibly show her apartment as where i am living?

Thanks so much for taking time to read this and leave comments and suggestions!
Every little bit helps and i'm happy to hear anyone's and everyone's feedback. All feedback is very much appreciated thanks again!

It sounds like a nice dream but you're gonna have to take a closer look at your options before packing your bags. I'm kind of in the same boat as you, plan to move there, eventually (3+ years). However, 5 months to plan is a bit difficult especially considering your other circumstances.
You've mentioned nothing about the type of work you want to find, what you're qualified for, your level of training and education, or where you're moving. You'll need to work eventually, do you have any offers or anyone that can employ you? Do you speak the language, if you don't you won't find a job.
6,500 Euros is a good amount of money if you are fine on living rather frugally but without income, it'll start to be a problem. Even if you plan on splitting the rent, from what I gather, the government doesn't really care. They more or less want to know if you can support yourself. In order words, will you be a financial strain on the country itself. This is where the possibility of a potential employer or sponsor comes in.
Non-professional visas also mean you cannot work, if you manage to find work you need to change your visa status. There's no way around it. And as you say, finding work under the table is possible but frankly impossible without any command of the French language.

Are you in a rush to move?
 

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I'm afraid you're going to find that your dream is just that - a dream at this point. To answer your specific points:

1. Financial guarantee - How much is enough depends entirely on what you tell them is your "reason" for wanting to live in France. With a set amount like what you have, they will expect you to have a specific goal in coming to France and will then evaluate the money you have with how long you are planning on staying. $10,000 won't last forever, so you won't get an open ended visa. But saying you are going over to live with your girlfriend kind of guarantees you'll be turned down.

2. If you go for a "non-professional" visa it means exactly that - no working. If you were to find a company willing to hire you, then yes, chances are that you would have to return to the US to apply for a work visa. It is getting harder and harder for companies here to get work authorization for foreigners, and they do have to justify hiring a foreigner over any available French or EU national, plus the government is cracking down on immigration matters these days.

3. Sponsor - Technically, your sponsor is your girlfriend. Her parents could probably sponsor you, but only if you're going over there to marry her.

4. Deed - This keeps coming up. By "deed" they probably mean deed or lease, and in some cases will take an "agreement to let" stating that a landlord is willing to rent to you, having checked out your credit worthiness.

Net-net, although they will accept someone with a fat trust fund or big savings (IRA or 401K) what they are really looking for on the financial side is a source of regular income that assures them that you won't be looking for social benefits.

As xversuskax said, you really haven't given us any indication of your "employability" in France, not to mention whether or not you speak the language. At your age, there is very little chance of getting a non-work visa, as it's pretty much assumed you'll have to work in order to remain in France - and unemployment amongst the under-26 year olds is very high.

It sounds really "unfair" I know - but just take a look at the US rules for those wanting to come to the US from Europe and you'll see that your problem isn't anywhere near as insurmountable.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I agree with what the others have said. I'm married to my frenchman but without one of you having gainful employment, $10,000 is not much and won't last very long at all. The financial strain will cause problems with your relationship and make things that much more difficult. If you can swing it, being here as a student would at least give you the possibility of working a few hours per week.

One last thing, Bev is correct about being turned down if you state that you are coming here to be with your "girlfriend". I did the same thing several years ago before I married my then boyfriend and they most definitly turned down my visa application until I had a much stronger financial situation pluse a french sponsor. They visa officer also said they were going to put some type of notification on my records stating that I must make an appearance at the American consulate one year later to insure that I had returned to the US and did not stay in France. I have no idea if they can do that or not, but I was not willing to take that chance.

Sorry for being such a downer, but you should really take a closer look at your situation and options before quitting your US job and moving into a totally unknown situation.

Best of luck,
 

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Forget the details - Do you Love her? If you do then forget everything anyone ever tells you and just do it!

My first winter in France was spent living in 13 square meters in a bedroom in Paris just behind Les Folies Bergere(I can't stand 'Fame' to this day), I had no money, neither did she. I couldn't work because I had no visa, so I played the guitar in the metro to get enough cash to buy wine and made her crappy dinners. She was a student. It's all so romantic it nearly makes me sick, and yet it's totally true.

Guess what? 12 years later and I'm still with her, legal, working, and integrated. Oh, and most importantly I'm still desperately in love with her.

Forget the money. Forget the details. Dare to dream and to live. There's nothing else to do. Sorry if that's cliché, but it's how I feel.
 

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Forget the details - Do you Love her? If you do then forget everything anyone ever tells you and just do it!

My first winter in France was spent living in 13 square meters in a bedroom in Paris just behind Les Folies Bergere(I can't stand 'Fame' to this day), I had no money, neither did she. I couldn't work because I had no visa, so I played the guitar in the metro to get enough cash to buy wine and made her crappy dinners. She was a student. It's all so romantic it nearly makes me sick, and yet it's totally true.

Guess what? 12 years later and I'm still with her, legal, working, and integrated. Oh, and most importantly I'm still desperately in love with her.

Forget the money. Forget the details. Dare to dream and to live. There's nothing else to do. Sorry if that's cliché, but it's how I feel.
anecdotal evidence should always be taken with great caution when making decisions.
however, it's your choice ultimately.
 

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um, Yes... and your formula for happiness is? All that finely calculated stuff you wrote about above doesn't change the fact that many (millions?) find their way through life by doing exactly what I suggested. Nothing cynical about following one's heart. What's the worst that could happen?
 

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What's the worst that could happen?
Arrest, deportation, banned from Schengen for up to 10 years?
Or found dead, and burial in a pauper's grave?

'Love is blind', it's often said.
But true love is going through what often appears as tedious and bureaucratic process with patience, good humour and persistence until your goal is achieved. This is often the fastest way.

Your way worked for you. Fine, bravo!:clap2:
But it may not work for everyone, and a prudent advice should also be offered, though the final choice always rests with the individual.
 

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Forget the details - Do you Love her? If you do then forget everything anyone ever tells you and just do it!

My first winter in France was spent living in 13 square meters in a bedroom in Paris just behind Les Folies Bergere(I can't stand 'Fame' to this day), I had no money, neither did she. I couldn't work because I had no visa, so I played the guitar in the metro to get enough cash to buy wine and made her crappy dinners. She was a student. It's all so romantic it nearly makes me sick, and yet it's totally true.

Guess what? 12 years later and I'm still with her, legal, working, and integrated. Oh, and most importantly I'm still desperately in love with her.

Forget the money. Forget the details. Dare to dream and to live. There's nothing else to do. Sorry if that's cliché, but it's how I feel.
Fifteen years ago I also took "the road less travelled" (for want of a more poetic euphemism :love:) in getting to France. It was hell - and it took nearly two years of fighting with the administration to get legal, even after we got married. Fighting with the administration takes its toll, and I spent the next five years wondering if I had made a huge mistake.

Add to that, the laws have changed considerably in the last 15 years so that I would not be able to do today what we did then.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Arrest, deportation, banned from Schengen for up to 10 years?
Or found dead, and burial in a pauper's grave?

'Love is blind', it's often said.
But true love is going through what often appears as tedious and bureaucratic process with patience, good humour and persistence until your goal is achieved. This is often the fastest way.

Your way worked for you. Fine, bravo!:clap2:
But it may not work for everyone, and a prudent advice should also be offered, though the final choice always rests with the individual.
Arrest and Deportation? I only suggested he follow his heart, not that he import guns and crack and to start his own brothel! I can't see much about being in love with a French girl that would get you arrested or deported unless she was one crazy mademoiselle.

You're right, much safer to stay in the mighty US of course, where your chances are better to be mugged, carjacked, killed in a drive-by, or just plain laid waste to by some maniac. As to 'burial in a pauper's grave' well, personally I'm of the conviction that once you finsih breathing you won't care much about the shape and color of the headstone. You're right, best stay safely at home and wait for a nice quiet end to all this.....

'Prudent advice'???? Why, that's what I'm offering. One of these days we all walk out of this life - do you want to be the one feeling like they never tried?

There's nothing extraordinary about me. If anything taking chances has has been the easiest, most profitable choice I've made in life.

@Bev - while you're right in that some things have become more complicated, others have gotten better I believe. For example when I finally(after 2 years of semi-legallity, without arrest, deportation or death in a pauper's grave) went about getting my work permit I was turned loose without the language skills to integrate easily - now there are, I believe, free language courses which are obligatory for immigrants -I have a Japanese friend and an American one who are both getting these lessons, which were not available to me.
 

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Hey there,
I've spent the last thirty years in and out of France without any visa. (American) Staying up to several years, working under the table. (I mean hell, the TVA should pay for the ride) Theres loads of undeclared work for us in Paris, (see Craigs or Fusac) How many times have I pulled in from Asia or Africa without a dime or visa? And things just seem to fit together. (there again, I speak fluent french)

You don't want to get caught working on the sly, or doing something naughty. Otherwise, that blue passport is a pass. I know it's unfair for the rest of humanity, but I've never had a negative experience with ID checks and no visa.

Keep in mind that staying out of the system is an imperative for me, a lifestyle. And not everyone is up to it, but with a french girlfriend it should be a piece of cake. Forget the red tape, just do it.

Stay light, b.
 
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Again for obvious reasons ExpatForum doesn't condone breaking national laws and this is the last thing we would advise people to do.

Much as it might seem a fun and adventurous lifestyle to the likes of 'Brilliant', many of us that are here legit are having to subsidise those working on the black with our considerable social security contributions supporting these people when they benefit from public services. And on top of this, I've seen hard working artisans who pay their taxes go under because of the competition from cowboy operators who get away with paying nothing.

As for busking in the Metro, well I wouldn't fancy doing that in current temperatures, but hey, love must conquer all. Even frostbite.
 
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Ok end of thread. ExpatForum obviously cannot condone illegal practices and Brilliant's post was encouragement to break the law. Hardly surprising that MTV responded in the way he did. He's a taxpayer. All the same the last few posts will be removed as they add little to the thread.
 
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