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-   -   No job land (https://www.expatforum.com/expats/spain-expat-forum-expats-living-spain/297938-no-job-land.html)

mickbcn 28th December 2013 09:19 PM

No job land
 
Very sad.

oronero 28th December 2013 10:22 PM

I feel sorry for those that live in cities and do not own some land where they could grow some crops and keep some animals. My grandparents survived like that with little money and brought up six children, times were tough but they survived...relying upon jobs as a means to earn money to pay for food and other bills has gone wrong for so many people.

Perhaps there will be a return to self sufficiency for the more fortunate ones, sadly those that appeared in the clip maybe in a more difficult position. with collateral tied into properties that they have little chance of selling.

So tragic. :(

gus-lopez 29th December 2013 07:01 AM

" So the only thing is for them to change their attitude & to think over what they are doing really carefully , because it may turn against them"

Yes, & I think that is why they have rewritten the "citizens law".

angil 29th December 2013 09:15 AM

http://www.seatrade-global.com/news/americas/pemex-in-$410m-order-at-spanish-shipyard-investment.html

We are still waiting for this to kick off! Hope for the welders and carpenters of Spain, maybe??

& unlike the men in the video we did have a little bit behind us (not a lot) to cushion the blow of being unemployed (unexpectedly) here in Spain. Just long enough for my husband to "get on his bike" once again & end up working Offshore Angola for the first time in his life.

whitenoiz 29th December 2013 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gus-lopez (Post 2708593)
" So the only thing is for them to change their attitude & to think over what they are doing really carefully , because it may turn against them"

Yes, & I think that is why they have rewritten the "citizens law".

Gus... I've got to agree... all over southern Europe the politicians are running scared. Thatcher, Blair et al, et seq., and Zapatero, Blanco and Rajoy are doing exactly the same thing here in Spain. All brought in Social reforms that directly affect the 'downtrodden masses.'

Its only a matter of time before people say enough is enough.

With the majority of EU governments relying on 2 party politics it will always be the same... "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss..."

Chopera 29th December 2013 01:13 PM

I used to live in the Fontarron area of Madrid, next to Vallecas and the "Parque de las tetas" where they were camping out. Perhaps even more frustrating is that many of the flats around that park were given away to gypsies in an attempt to get them off the streets. And now the people whose taxes paid for that found themselves on the streets (or at least camping in a park) instead. Unfortunately the people in the video are under the usual Spanish illusion that giving people more employment rights and effectively making it more expensive for companies to hire people will somehow make more jobs appear.

VFR 29th December 2013 03:00 PM

Well Europe could stop China flooding the place with cheap goods & that may well help ?

JoCatalunya 29th December 2013 04:30 PM

Didn't you guys know, Spain is out of the recession. So sayeth some moron politician a few months back and all because there was a marginal improvement for a few weeks out of how many in a year?

Quote:

Well Europe could stop China flooding the place with cheap goods & that may well help ?
China isn't the problem, not in my opinion.

What is, is the attitude that folk have here when they are in work. How many times have any of us gone to a government office and seen no end of folk just sitting around, not actually doing much if anything? I personally have lost count at how many times I have been sent from one office to another to get a stamp, to go to another to get an appointment so I can return to the first office and be told I need then to go to some other place and start the ball rolling all over again.

And how many times have you seen the whole of the emergency department in some hospital go on a coffee break, leaving patients without anyone to attend to their needs no matter how much hollering anyone does that they are surely bleeding to death.

But here is a thing, instead of throwing people out onto the streets because they fall behind with the mortgage, how about the banks let them stay in their flats, houses etc because fact is, they cannot sell them for love nor money so they may as well have the owner sitting there, looking after it than leaving it empty to get vandalised etc.

mrypg9 29th December 2013 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by whitenoiz (Post 2709873)
Gus... I've got to agree... all over southern Europe the politicians are running scared. Thatcher, Blair et al, et seq., and Zapatero, Blanco and Rajoy are doing exactly the same thing here in Spain. All brought in Social reforms that directly affect the 'downtrodden masses.'

Its only a matter of time before people say enough is enough.

With the majority of EU governments relying on 2 party politics it will always be the same... "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss..."

Tony Blair, whom incidentally I detest, having once believed he walked on water, brought in several reforms that helped the low paid, Working Family Tax Credit being one and Gordon Brown's Sure Start helped many poorer families although it never really delivered on its promise. So credit where it's due..although admittedly not much.
The problem with what you post is simply this: although 26% are without work in Spain, 74% are, however precarious their employment may be for some. In the UK the percentage of those in work is even higher. In a democracy you have to persuade the better-off to vote to help the less well-off by willingly paying higher taxes. Revolutions never represent the 'masses' and always end up oppressing them.
Most people have a lot more to lose these days than their chains. Capitalism has raised the material standard of living of the majority to levels unthought of in say 1945. The very notion that working people could own cars, tvs, their own homes, enjoy foreign holidays and even own homes in other countries would have been ridiculed. Social services such as education, health, care for the elderly are available to all.
But I agree there will be change. Indeed, a thinktank whose name I can't remember forecasts global change by 2020. The changes won't be to any kind of socialist planned economy -tried in Eastern Europe and the USSR and failed - or some kind of Trotskyite collectivism -tried in parts of Spain in 1936 -9 and failed *see Fraser: 'Blood of Spain'. Change will most likely come in the form of a move back to a more updated version of Keyensianism. I'd like to see a kind of collective/co-operative ownership within a regulated social market economy, on the John Lewis model.
Not only is the current neo-liberal model manifestly inefficient in economic terms, it is destroying our social fabric and creating massive future problems. I don't use the term 'free market' because there is no such thing...so-called 'free' markets can only exist within a strong powerful state. They are created, they are not spontaneous.
Change will come imo when the technocrats begin to realise the damage done to thenm and the rest of us by plutocrats..
I hope I live to see it.:)

angil 29th December 2013 05:45 PM

I know its a 'cultural thing' and all of that (15 years in Asia and I had 'culture' coming out of my ears)................................ but when me and my daughter are wandering around Feungirola high street watching shops systematically close before our very eyes, on a Saturday, for their afternoon kip! leaving us wondering where to spend hubbys worldwide wide (heavily taxed in Spain) income I have to assume those folk mustn't be short of a bob or two?!!! In one little store that sold scarves and bits and pieces the shop girl seemed genuinely miffed we were in her store at all (I am guessing nap time was approaching!?).
& in all of our years overseas in expat communities (mostly oil/gas & shipbuilding, but also encounters with automotive, nuclear power plant, Nike & aerospace industries) I only encountered one native Spanish man & he was ships crew so just visiting. I literally met folks from all over the globe (Spanish speakers - Mexicans, Chileans etc) but no Spaniards. Folks all going where the work is. In latter years we met a couple of young Spanish students, girls, who had degrees and were doing their Masters at a Korean University. One of them was my son's tutor. Lovely girl, learning Korean as that is where she saw her future. Having held down 5 part time jobs in Spain before leaving. Thankfully my daughters second language is Korean, Mandarin or Japanese would be next on the agenda not Spanish. Got to think of her future! & its not here! We simply have not encountered the same work ethic here as we did in Asia.


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