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-   -   Locked out with key in inside lock! (https://www.expatforum.com/expats/spain-expat-forum-expats-living-spain/1490752-locked-out-key-inside-lock.html)

Juan C 9th November 2019 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MataMata (Post 14985412)
I never did understand the logic behind the key being in on one side preventing a key going in from the other, other than enriching locksmiths what practical or useful purpose can it serve?

.


It is a security measure.

If you are inside and leave the key in the lock, turned at an angle, then no one with a duplicate key can open the door from outside.

Particularly important in a property which one has rented.

Not wishing to be sexist, but maybe even more important for a single female.

Juan C 9th November 2019 08:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by baldilocks (Post 14985414)
Interesting that we have a few [ex?] burglars on the forum. :D

And former police officers experienced in investigating burglaries, too !

baldilocks 9th November 2019 08:49 AM

If one has an alarm button connected to a call centre (the sort that the aged and or infirm might have) and one has keys with neighbours to be able to come in to help - bear in mind that for their keys to work, the tips for preventing burglars' spare keys opening the lock, should not be used.

AdeP 10th November 2019 10:35 PM

Thanks all for the advice for getting back in and avoiding in the future.
Sort of kicking myself I didn't try the card trick before leaving or at least investigating.

It my be my parrtner visiting on her own next so may have to bite the bullet and arrange a locksmith as it's too high risk for her to go there and try the suggestions.

But I'll definitely look at seeing if we can fit a handle on the outside too, seems the neatest solution for the future.

Thanks again :)

Alcalaina 11th November 2019 01:26 PM

I locked myself out on the first-floor balcony yesterday while cleaning the windows. They are the sliding-door kind, and I accidently pushed it too hard and it clicked shut. Imagine my embarrassment. Had to yell my head off to attract OHs attention, as he was downstairs in the garage working with power tools. Sometimes I'm really glad I don't live on my own.

Nomoss 12th November 2019 04:45 AM

Our internal doors have pretty, ornate, handles with fake porcelain grips held on to die-cast zamac bosses.

A couple of weeks ago I was opening the bathroom door from inside when the die-cast piece snapped off flush with the escucheon plate.

The bathroom is two rooms and a corridor away from the kitchen, where my wife was, so shouting and banging on the door had no effect.

If I had been alone in the house I would probably have kicked a panel out of the door.

There wasn't much in the bathroom in the way of tools except the contents of my sponge-bag, but I eventually managed to jam a nail file into the nub of the zamac piece by hammering it in with the back of a hairbrush, then used a large pair of scissors to get enough leverage on the file to open the latch.

I found that the door handle had been weakened by banging against a cupboard when opened too far, so I have now fitted a stop to prevent this happening again.

baldilocks 12th November 2019 05:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nomoss (Post 14987496)
Our internal doors have pretty, ornate, handles with fake porcelain grips held on to die-cast zamac bosses.

A couple of weeks ago I was opening the bathroom door from inside when the die-cast piece snapped off flush with the escucheon plate.

The bathroom is two rooms and a corridor away from the kitchen, where my wife was, so shouting and banging on the door had no effect.

If I had been alone in the house I would probably have kicked a panel out of the door.

There wasn't much in the bathroom in the way of tools except the contents of my sponge-bag, but I eventually managed to jam a nail file into the nub of the zamac piece by hammering it in with the back of a hairbrush, then used a large pair of scissors to get enough leverage on the file to open the latch.

I found that the door handle had been weakened by banging against a cupboard when opened too far, so I have now fitted a stop to prevent this happening again.

and, hopefully, a new handle! :D

Nomoss 12th November 2019 05:21 AM

Our house has conventional solid wooden window shutters and electric roller shutters on the outside doors, so our only way in if the electricity is cut is through the garage.

Normally when we go out in the car I drive it out of the garage, closing the door behind me, and my wife leaves by the main house door, locking it and closing the electric shutter by the key switch on the outside.

One day she decided to leave with me via the garage, checked all the shutters were closed and locked the main door, but left the whole bunch of keys in the inside of it.

She waited in the garage until I drove out, then locked the "up and over" garage door from the inside and slammed it shut.

"I hope you've got the keys" I said. - Oh!

After a choice selection of expletives I eventually found that if I pulled the door as far as possible to the left, by its handle, a small gap could be opened on the right hand side.
My wife jammed a flat piece of wood handily lying around into the bottom of the gap, after which I managed to lever the gap wider with tools from the car, finally reach the latch, and push it over to unlock the right hand side.
With my wife forcing that corner inwards beyond the frame I levered the whole bottom of the door to the right so that I could release the left hand lock, and the door was open.

A few weeks later I found a much easier way, when I accidentally backed the car into the garage door (don't ask me why).

I didn't hit it very hard, no damage to door or car, but it was sufficient to dislodge the two 6 mm coach screws on each side and the single one at the top, fixed into the block wall with plastic plugs, and the entire door and frame fell flat on the garage floor.

I have now replaced the screws and plugs with nine 8 mm expanding bolts, three each side and three more at the top.

Nomoss 12th November 2019 05:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by baldilocks (Post 14987510)
and, hopefully, a new handle! :D

Yes. Fortunately Mr Bricolage across the road still sells the same design.

But the handles come in pairs with escutcheon plates, held in with circlips, and the relative positions of the handle and keyhole are different, so have to be bought in pairs and dismantled to get a spare handle.

Overandout 12th November 2019 06:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nomoss (Post 14987496)
Our internal doors have pretty, ornate, handles with fake porcelain grips held on to die-cast zamac bosses.

A couple of weeks ago I was opening the bathroom door from inside when the die-cast piece snapped off flush with the escucheon plate.

The bathroom is two rooms and a corridor away from the kitchen, where my wife was, so shouting and banging on the door had no effect.

If I had been alone in the house I would probably have kicked a panel out of the door.

There wasn't much in the bathroom in the way of tools except the contents of my sponge-bag, but I eventually managed to jam a nail file into the nub of the zamac piece by hammering it in with the back of a hairbrush, then used a large pair of scissors to get enough leverage on the file to open the latch.

I found that the door handle had been weakened by banging against a cupboard when opened too far, so I have now fitted a stop to prevent this happening again.

You must be the only person left in the western world who doesn't take their mobile phone into the bathroom!


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