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-   -   Looking for mold - free place in Spain (https://www.expatforum.com/expats/spain-expat-forum-expats-living-spain/1473718-looking-mold-free-place-spain.html)

LisaDav 3rd February 2019 05:38 PM

Looking for mold - free place in Spain
 
Hello,

I am considering moving to Spain from US. I am sensitive to mold so I need dry place without mold and fungus issues. And no floods and too much rains and snow of course not to say hurricanes and tornadoes. Please let me know if there are nice places to live close to ocean or lake but not too wet.

Thanks,

Lisa

kalohi 3rd February 2019 06:59 PM

Then Seville is not the place for you!! I just spent the afternoon mopping down the walls with bleach in several rooms to kill off the mold.

It's very hot and dry here in the summer, but the winter is the rainy season and indoors the houses are cold and damp. Few houses have heat so the cold and damp just settle indoors.

Almeria is the driest area of Spain. Maybe someone who lives in there can comment on if there is a damp problem in the houses.

xabiaxica 4th February 2019 11:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LisaDav (Post 14790554)
Hello,

I am considering moving to Spain from US. I am sensitive to mold so I need dry place without mold and fungus issues. And no floods and too much rains and snow of course not to say hurricanes and tornadoes. Please let me know if there are nice places to live close to ocean or lake but not too wet.

Thanks,

Lisa

Anywhere coastal will be humid/damp. Where I live we regularly have 99%+ humidity at night - all year round, & daytime it rarely drops below 60%.

baldilocks 4th February 2019 11:30 AM

One of the problems in southern Spain is it is in a seismically active area, i.e. earthquakes are not unknown so they do not put in damp-proof courses to help avoid the building sliding off its foundations. This means that rising damp can often be a problem.

Frequently the Spanish way is to fit ceramic tiles to the lower metre of the downstairs walls - the damp is still there but it is enclosed so there is not much mould forming dampness on the surface. There are other ways of forming a damp-proof barrier including the use of PVA to form a plastic barrier.

Upper walls and walls in general do not have a cavity so the wall you have on the inside is the same wall as is on the outside. This means that exposed walls can get a lot of rain which causes damp (and mould) on the inside. Barriers are the way to prevent this happening. Again the use of PVA on the inside of the wall and the use of an impervious render on the outside. Once you have the impermeable render (I can't remember the name of it!) paint with plastic emulsion paint. DO NOT use cal which requires re-painting every year and flakes off when it rains.

baldilocks 4th February 2019 12:29 PM

EDIT:
It is called Capa Fina

Beach buddy 4th February 2019 12:31 PM

Lack of damp courses doesnt help. Would recommend New build, built with your supervision then you could put one in. I have lived in quite a few houses and all have had damp to some degree or other.

baldilocks 4th February 2019 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beach buddy (Post 14791254)
Lack of damp courses doesnt help. Would recommend New build, built with your supervision then you could put one in. I have lived in quite a few houses and all have had damp to some degree or other.

If you are in the seismic zone it is illegal to put in a DPC

Beach buddy 4th February 2019 12:38 PM

Well dont choose an area that is prone.

Alcalaina 4th February 2019 04:21 PM

I've never known a house that doesn't get winter mould in southern Spain. The answer is to attack any patch of mould with diluted bleach immediately it starts to appear. Moisten it with a sponge and leave it for half an hour to kill the spores before washing it off - never scrape dry mould because that's how the spores spread.

Look for somewhere well ventilated, and install dehumidifiers or extractor fans if necessary. I think the room temperature makes a difference too; since we put a heated towel rail in the bathroom (left on all winter) there hasn't been any mould there.

baldilocks 4th February 2019 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alcalaina (Post 14791432)
I've never known a house that doesn't get winter mould in southern Spain. The answer is to attack any patch of mould with diluted bleach immediately it starts to appear. Moisten it with a sponge and leave it for half an hour to kill the spores before washing it off - never scrape dry mould because that's how the spores spread.

Look for somewhere well ventilated, and install dehumidifiers or extractor fans if necessary. I think the room temperature makes a difference too; since we put a heated towel rail in the bathroom (left on all winter) there hasn't been any mould there.

We don't have mould, at least not now since we dealt with it as described in post 4


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