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housing - Page 3


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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 5th January 2011, 03:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anski View Post
I found these 2 websites they may be of use to anyone who requires more information on the NZ property market. The first one I found very helpful when I first bought it did have more information on individual suburbs then for free now I believe you need to subscribe in order to access more in dept statistics.

www.reinz.co.nz

- zoodle, it's all about property.
This is a good set of links for providing extra help and advice when buying homes. Thank you

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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 5th January 2011, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by FrancisJames View Post
Anski thanks for trying to tell people about the dangers of leaky homes. They are notoriously difficult to spot and I think you have to remove wall plaster to tell for sure if they leak? that's something that isn't going to happen on a routine pre-sale purchaser's inspection.

The other problem is that people are so wary about them now that even if your house is outwardly perfect now people won't buy it if they think it may have problems in the future.
When we bought our house the building inspector we hired had a gadget that tested the moisture level in every single external wall. Apparently this can highlight problems without the need to physically damage the surfaces. I haven't the foggiest how it works!

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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 5th January 2011, 11:48 AM
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Probably similar to the Damp Meter used for testing whether or not a Motorhome
or Caravan has signs of the dreaded damp..

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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 6th January 2011, 02:21 AM
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When we bought our house the building inspector we hired had a gadget that tested the moisture level in every single external wall. Apparently this can highlight problems without the need to physically damage the surfaces. I haven't the foggiest how it works!
I don't think that would have been the only method he used to find out if your home leaked. This is from one of the most highly regarded information sites about leaky homes in New Zealand and talks about the merits of different types of inspection techniques.

Leakyhomeforum New Zealand Blog Archive What is a moisture inspection?

Quote:
I wish I knew what I do now about moisture detection when I had my pre-purchase inspection carried out. And that is:

* A low moisture level does not necessarily mean your house is not leaking, just that the area tested was dry at the time. Completely rotten timber may have a lower than average moisture reading if given enough time to dry out.

* A high moisture reading does not necessarily mean your house is leaking. Moisture meters are susceptible to many influences that can skew their readings, one being the person using them.

The higher the weathertightness risk of your home, or the home you are intending purchasing, the more seriously you need to consider how you go about testing it for weathertightness. The four main types of moisture detection are:

1. Moisture Meter (Non-invasive Mode)
2. Thermal Imaging (Non-invasive)
3. Moisture Meter (Invasive Mode)
4. Destructive Testing
This will tell you a bit about how moisture meters work Topcat
Quote:
1) Moisture Meter (Non-invasive Mode)

Moisture meters are battery powered electronic devices, typically with two probes between which the density of the material they are placed on is measured. In other words, by placing the probes on the surface of a wall the density of the framing timber (actually, its electrical conductivity) behind can be measured, hence the name “non-invasive”.

The conductivity reading of the meter is compared to a chart which converts it to a moisture percentage. All very nice except for two minor complications:

* These meters were designed to be used directly on framing timber, like in a timber yard or the framing of a house under construction, before the interior walls go up. They were never designed to be used on gib or a variety of other materials, so interpretation of their readings is quite dependent on the experience of the operator.

* Readings can be skewed by many factors, including cables running inside walls (higher conductivity), reinforcing metal strips in corners and many more. Look at the photo above again, not a good example.

If an unusually high reading is recorded, the common practice among experts it to take a control reading of a ‘known’ good area, and use that as a comparison. You could then use thermal imaging to define better where the dampness starts, and where it ends, but you may still not know where it came from.
This may be useful for anyone considering buying a house in New Zealand, the 4 Ds of weathertightness.
Quote:
Knowing what constitutes a high risk or low risk construction building (from a weathertightness perspective), is a piece of knowledge I wish I had when I was buying my house. Perhaps this knowledge will help you understand better whether the house you are looking at has more, or less risks than the rest?

It turns out there are a few basic rules designers use now to determine the risk of a building, and thus the measures required to keep it weathertight according to E2/AS1 of the building code (which was revamped in 2005).

The risks are calculated using what is called the “Risk Matrix” (surprisingly). This determines how much the weathertightness of a design is going to be compromised by particular design features (such as lack of eaves/eaves width), environmental conditions (wind zones) and so on.

The key to weathertight design though is in four design principles known as “The Four D’s”. The Risk Matrix only calculates the impact on The Four D’s. The larger the impact on The Four D’s, the more detail will be required in the design and cladding to keep the building weathertight.

The Four D’s of Weathertightness

The Four D’s, in order of importance are:

1. Deflection
2. Drainage
3. Drying
4. Durability
Plenty more information about what that means is here
Leakyhomeforum New Zealand Blog Archive Understanding the risks of a building

The NZ Institute of Building Surveyors has a list of members qualified to do pre-purchase surveys, not just in Auckland but around the country, who are also Certified Weathertightness surveyors - which is what I'd go for if I were thinking of buying.

New Zealand Institute of Building Surveyors (inc.)

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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 6th January 2011, 04:53 AM
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I would not trust any of these gadgets or the companies that use them. They can mislead. As I stated before my real estate agent friend had to hand over $25,000 because she sold a couple a leaky home unknowingly. She said after wards they had paid for the most expensive company in Auckland to test this house before purchasing & it passed all clear. But it had problems,
My friend also sold a leaky home recently for less than $600,000 It would normally have sold for in excess of $1,400,000 had it been 100% ok.
No such thing as a Free Lunch.
At any price I do not think these homes are worthwhile as you are buying into an unseen can of worms & you never know the full extent of the rectification under you start.
That is why there is a shift to older homes people are staying away from anything built within a certain time frame.

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