Anyone living in Tlaquepaque? - Page 2

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Mexico Expat Forum for Expats Living in Mexico With an area of two million square kilometers, Mexico is the fifth largest country in the Americas and has a larger population of US and Canadian expats than any other country.

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Anyone living in Tlaquepaque? - Page 2


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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 5th May 2019, 05:14 PM
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Mexico is a very large country and the weather changes according to the altitude which you do not have in Florida. I lived on the gulf in Mexico in Alabama for a few years and I can assure you that there is no comparison between Guadalajara and Florida. On the coast ok but not in the mountains. We are at 5000 feet and the humidity is low, the nights are cool no matter when..
If you work on-line and get paid in dollars in the US then you owe taxes to the US ..I do not see Mexico kicking you out if you pay taxes in one place or another. As long as you follow the law you will have no problem.
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 5th May 2019, 07:30 PM
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I wouldn't cheat the US government. I'm too afraid of them. LOL

I know the interior in the mountains is drier and cooler, which is why I wanted to live there, but I will definitely miss the trees. I may miss them so much I will have to move further south. I can deal with the heat and humidity, but barrenness is depressing to me. But we'll see how I feel once I get there and find a place to settle for awhile.

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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 5th May 2019, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by DebInFL View Post
I wouldn't cheat the US government. I'm too afraid of them. LOL

I know the interior in the mountains is drier and cooler, which is why I wanted to live there, but I will definitely miss the trees. I may miss them so much I will have to move further south. I can deal with the heat and humidity, but barrenness is depressing to me. But we'll see how I feel once I get there and find a place to settle for awhile.
I don't know the Guadalajara/Chapala area, in terms of trees or barrenness. But where we have our house, in Tepoztlan, Morelos (about 20 minutes from Cuernavaca, and 1 hr 20 minutes south of Mexico City) there are lots of trees and it is not at all barren. In fact our place, which is a small house on about 700 m2 of surrounding land on the outskirts of town at an altitude of 1900 m (6230 ft), is surrounded by trees, with lots of birdsong both at dawn and dusk. We're right on the edge of a forest, the Tepozteco National Park, which is a protected bioreserve. There are also lots of flowers, vines, exuberant bougainvillea spilling over stone walls. It truly is a region of eternal spring.

Wishing you the best of luck in your adventure of finding the place that will be "just right" for you.

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Last edited by ojosazules11; 5th May 2019 at 11:06 PM.
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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 5th May 2019, 11:16 PM
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In terms of markets in our town, we have a permanent 7 day per week market (el mercado) in the central plaza (semi-open air - it is not roofed, but everyone has the brightly coloured tarps over top to protect from both sun and rain) where you can get all manner of fruits, vegetables, meat, chicken, fresh hand-made tortillas (being made as you wait), cheese, flowers, notions, fresh juices and lots of stalls to eat prepared food (quesadillas, huaraches, tlacoyos, itacates, caldos, sopes, tortas, tamales, pre-hispanic foods, etc. etc.). There is also the artisanal market set up as a "tianguis" on the main street on Saturday and Sunday, and also a smaller tianguis on Wednesdays. And there are also some smaller fruit and vegetable open air markets (tianguis) in outlying parts of town - I know of one that is only on Sundays - we often go there as the prices are better than in the main market.

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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 6th May 2019, 12:47 AM
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right now the hills north of Ajijic and Chapala have a bunch of fires , the mountains are covered with trees ..

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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 6th May 2019, 01:12 AM
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right now the hills north of Ajijic and Chapala have a bunch of fires , the mountains are covered with trees ..
Forest fires are all too common in the forests around Tepoztlan as well, from Feb - May, given how dry it gets prior to the return of the rain. There is a ban on the burning of fields in preparation for planting, but old traditions die hard. Other causes of fire in recent years have been visitors hiking in the mountains, and being careless with fire (e.g. dropping a cigarette).

Right now there is a water crisis in Tepoztlan due to how hot and dry it is, and the "pipas" (water trucks to fill cisterns) are hard to come by right now. There is major highway construction by our town, and my husband noted that there are a lot of pipas of water at the construction site to help compact the earth, so he is wondering if the amount of water being used on that infrastructure project is part of the current shortage. He has lived in Tepoztlan dating back 36 years, and does not remember it ever being this bad. According to weather.com, the first day with a significant probability of rain (80%) is on Thursday, May 16. Ojalá.

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Last edited by Isla Verde; 6th May 2019 at 02:30 AM.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 6th May 2019, 02:03 AM
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Speaking of trees in Mexico, there are lots of them in my neighborhood in the center of Mexico City, near El Angel and El Paseo de la Reforma, a lovely avenue lined with trees. I am a short bus ride from the Bosque de Chapultepec, a huge park full of trees and flowers and other sorts of green stuff, and the home of several of the city's most important museums. It was once the private retreat of Aztec royalty, but now is definitely "the people's park".

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Old 8th May 2019, 06:23 PM
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I might be ok in an apartment if I had green spaces to go to, but I'd prefer a small yard to grow my own veggies. We'll see once I get there. I'm also looking at some cities in Oaxaca that I just learned about. I'll probably move around for a few years until I find a place to really settle, but when you live out of two large suitcases, that isn't so hard, is it?

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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 9th May 2019, 05:35 AM
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DebInFl, one of the greatest disservices that US media and Hollywood have done to México is give the impression to US citizens is that México is all desert. The truth is that the most barren parts are the parts that are close to the US border (the parts most Americans see when they cross the border into México to visit the border towns.) The truth is that the USA has far more desert than México could ever dream of having. Think of West Texas, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona and etc. Once you get down past the states of Zacatecas and San Luís Potosí, México starts becoming rather lush and forested. Jalisco is a very green and forested state for the most part. It has some dry areas of course, but most of it is very green and forested. I am from North Carolina, so I see where you are coming from. The Guadalajara area and Lake Chapala is a very beautiful area with lots and lots of trees everywhere. But if you want to live in an area that looks more like western North Carolina, similar to the Blue Ridge Mountains, so to speak, just go higher up in elevation to places like Mazamitla, Tapalpa, Mascota, and San Sebastián del Oeste, those areas are high altitude and full of dense pine forests that smell heavenly. In fact Mazamitla is just a two hour drive across the lake from the city of Chapala. Check out the videos on youtube about these locations. In Chapala, you are far from living in a desert. Sure the mountains turn brown in the dry season or winter that is, but in the summer rainy season it looks like Hawaii, and the towns and gardens stay green year round with just a little watering.
Here is a short video that I found on youtube about someone that drove from Texas to Ajijic, Lake Chapala during the rainy season. It appears that they drove down by way of the Zacatecas route, as you can see, near the border it is very dry and desert like, but by midway down it starts to get rather green and gorgeous looking. I think Jalisco begins around the 3:30 minutes. From there it just gets greener and more forested until you get to the Ajijic, Chapala area. Down here, we are not living in a desert, all the contrary, it is green and beautiful down here.

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Old 9th May 2019, 05:39 AM
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