Settling in to Australia.

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Life in Australia This new forum is for those generalized discussions about what it's like to actually live and work in Australia. Please post visa-processing, employment and travel-related questions in the main forum - but here you can meet fellow expats and discuss various aspects of your new life in Australia.

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Settling in to Australia.


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Old 7th November 2018, 04:34 AM
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Arrow Settling in to Australia.

I thought I'd start a thread to give people an idea of what to expect coming to Australia. Obviously everyone's experiences will be different depending on the country you came from, and whether you are trying to bring a family over.

I first came to Australia on a 457 visa in 2008 and left to go work in Dubai in 2013. My company first gave me accomodation for 4 weeks in Melbourne while I could look for a place. Moving to another country is an emotional rollercoaster that I didn't expect. I had assumed going from one english speaking country to another would be so easy. On the surface it was. I'd say the first 6 months was exciting, exploring and meeting new people, everywhere was an adventure.
After the 6 months reality set in, after moving into an apartment with a roommate, I wasn't getting along with him, so there was a lot of tension at home. I realized my boss was very dodgey which was making work stressful, I was annoyed how shops all closed so early and just overall felt like I wasn't making any close friendships. Nothing seemed the same as back home. I couldn't get the food I liked to usually eat, and everything just seemed so much more expensive. I'd say for the next year I was pretty stressed and upset.
I moved into a new apartment with roommates, who were much better and got along with them, and started to feel at home in Australia finally. I got involved in some sports and was finally making some real friendships. I'd say it was maybe about 2 years in until I really felt like Australia was home.

Despite that in 2013, I moved to Dubai to earn money, because the property market was so expensive in Melbourne, I wanted to go to dubai so I could save up and buy a place after I got PR.

I made my decision to apply for PR in Oct. 2017. I arrived in Australia on Oct.31 2018.

I'll write a second message giving some information that will be helpful with some links.

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Old 7th November 2018, 05:01 AM
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MEDICARE:

I arrived in Australia on Oct. 31st to Melbourne (originally on a subclass 400 visa provided by my company. 400 subclass visa allowed me to work in Australia for up to 3 months. My company was hoping I'd get my PR while I was in Australia, but I warned them about DHA's processing times as there was no guarantee. By the grace of God within 2 days of arriving in Australia, I received my 189 Visa grant.

Nov. 3rd I flew to my company's office in Perth. It is looking like they want me to relocate there.
So far the weather has been nice. Perth is very clean, a city of about 2million people. People are very friendly. Food is very good, but it tends to be expensive around the city centre. Most Australian cities are like this. You are better off going to the suburbs. Chinese/asian/indian food at restaurants tends to cost less (but much more tastey).
Shops and restaurants close very early. Shops (including most supermarkets) close at 5pm. I think one night a week, there is "late night" shopping until 8pm. Restaurants will mostly be open until 8 or 9pm. The only restaurants open later are a few pubs, and McDonalds.

With the shops closing early at 5pm, it means at lunch time the shops have huge lines as people are trying to get their shopping done on their lunchbreak from work.
If you need to do any banking/going to a mobile phone store, i'd recommend just telling your boss you need to go first thing in the morning and you will work later into the night.

I plan to explore the botanical gardens and beaches this weekend.

Getting a transit card (transperth) was simple, just going to the information booth at the main station in the CBD.

I got a pay as you go local sim card until I settle into a more permanent house. Afterwards I will switch to a contract plan that is cheaper. Getting prepaid sim card was simple, just bring your passport to the shop. I went with Telstra. They aren't the cheapest, but have the largest national network coverage. All calls between mobile phones are free, no long distance charges calling between mobile phones. Compared to Canada or the UAE, the mobile plan packages are really good.
The major mobile phone service providers are Telstra, Vodafone, Optus, Virgin. There's many other smaller providers that provide different plans, but they will either connect to the telstra, optus or vodafone networks.
Don't just go into the stores, but check out some comparison websites firsts, like - https://www.canstarblue.com.au to get any idea of what kind of services each phone plans provide from different carriers. You can then go into the stores and check for any further deals.

I haven't had to set up TV/Internet/home phone/electricity yet, as I'm in company paid for accomodation.
But in general there's lots of choices between companies for these different services.
One thing you'll want to consider for telephone is whether you want "free to air" or "foxtel". Free to air are what they say, the free over the air received tv channels that are broadcast for free to a receiver in your apartment building which are local Australian channels. ABC and SBS are government run television stations, they also provide radio. ABC is news/entertainment, SBS is more news/cultural. They do have programs in different languages and their websites cater to different languages. Foxtel would be like your satellite/cable television service, if you want more channels and international and specialty channels. This is obviously much more expensive.


Yesterday I registered for medicare, it was quite an easy setup, just brought my passport to a MyGov office, my visa was electronically linked, and they gave me my medicare number on the spot on a piece of paper, my medicare card will be sent in the mail. Make sure when you fill out the medicare form to select you select that you want a "lifetime Health card cover letter". So if you apply for private health insurance you won't get charged the extra 1.5% to your income tax.

Once my work contract formally switches to Australia, I will need to look at private health insurance. There's public healthcare, but it is limited to emergency services, so will be looking at supplementary insurance for dental and other procedures. There are many websites that will help you compare, such as ( https://www.privatehealth.gov.au/dynamic/search).
You should know that if you are over 31, and your salary is more than $90,000 the government will charge you 1.5% extra income tax if you DON'T take out private health insurance. There are two types of hospitals in Australia, Public (government run) hospitals and private hospitals. You can be treated in public hospitals for various emergency services with your medicare card, but not at private hospitals. My Australian friends say the cheapest private and best option for private health insurance is to select private health insurance that covers you for additional services in public hospitals only, and not the private hospitals. Looking at the insurance comparison websites this is true, and will go down this route.

My next post will be on superannuation.

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Initial EOI: 01/2018 (60 points)
Updated EOI: 20/03/2018 (75 points)
ITA SC189: 21/03/2018
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Grant: 02/11/2018
Offshore Applicant
https://myimmitracker.com/signs/au/c...189/case-42813

Last edited by internationalcanuck; 7th November 2018 at 05:22 AM.
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Old 7th November 2018, 05:09 AM
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SUPERANNUATION:
Once my work contract shifts from Dubai to the Perth office, I will need to look at choosing a superannuation (retirement) fund. Companies are required by law to take 9.5% of your salary and deposit it into a retirement investment account of your choice. Companies usually partner with a provider to make it easier, and there is a default investment fund they will put your money into if you don't tell them otherwise, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's best for you.

This 9.5% comes off your pre-text salary, so it does help to reduce the taxes you pay. Just be aware, 9.5% savings may not be enough to help you save for your retirement, which is why the government allows you to contribute up to a maximum of $25,000 of your pre-tax salary per year to your superannuation, any contributions after that come from your after-tax dollars. My understanding is that most people should be aiming for saving 15% for retirement. 9.5% is probably good if you started working right out of university, but you will need more if you are starting later in life.

https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/ is a really great government website to help you understand and make decisions regarding your finances - budgeting, savings, investing, retirement. It has some great tools to help estimate how much money you will need to retire by your desired age, and whether you are on track.

There are a variety of website to help you compare superannuation funds:
https://www.canstar.com.au/superannuation/
https://www.canstar.com.au/superannuation/
http://www.chantwest.com.au/
https://www.morningstar.com.au/Tools/NewFundScreener
https://www.ratecity.com.au/superannuation
https://www.selectingsuper.com.au/
https://www.superratings.com.au/

There's different types of Superannuation funds:
- Industry Funds - These used to be run only for members of specific industry unions, but now they are open to anyone, they are widely reported to be the best in terms of cost/performance because they are non-profit, but some are expensive
- Retail Funds - these are run by banks, and investment companies. They aren't as popular, as they have the reputation of being "for profit" and therefore have higher fees, but again this is changing from the research i've seen, and evaluating a few like Virgin, AMP, and ANZ who have some funds will very low fees. When I was working previously on my 457, I was putting money in BTSuper superannuation investment, when I looked at the total fees charged, it was around the same many Industry Funds, and the performance was just as good.
- SMSF (Self-Managed Superannuation Fund) - This is for people that want to have complete control of managing their own investments, they basically set up their own financial corporation by themselves or a few friends/partners, this lets you directly put stocks/equities from the stock market or real estate investments into your fund and shelter it from taxes. The paperwork and expenses are quite hard if you start with $0 investment dollars, and is only worth it if you have over $500,000 ready to invest.
- Closed Funds - these are funds set up for employees of very large companies (telstra or banks) or are for state employees, the general public can't choose these unless you are working for them.


If anyone needs help in Australia about this, I can help you choose, as I have done a lot of research and enjoy discussing investing. (I'm not a financial adviser, nor am I promoting any product, I will give my best personal advice to help, but the final decision is yours :-) ).

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ANZCO: 233211
Initial EOI: 01/2018 (60 points)
Updated EOI: 20/03/2018 (75 points)
ITA SC189: 21/03/2018
Lodged: 27/03/2018
Grant: 02/11/2018
Offshore Applicant
https://myimmitracker.com/signs/au/c...189/case-42813

Last edited by internationalcanuck; 7th November 2018 at 05:21 AM.
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Old 7th November 2018, 05:18 AM
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Hello,

Thanks for spending your time and sharing information to others. Looking forward to know more about sharing your experience about living in Australia.

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Old 7th November 2018, 05:21 AM
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Banks

I already have a bank account from my previous stay in Australia, but again, it's good to search around for the best bank for your needs before walking into a bank. Again, lots of comparison websites are available if you do a quick good search. Many of the same websites I listed for superannuation also provide comparison between banks of different checking and savings accounts as well as credit cards (https://www.canstar.com.au/transaction-accounts/).

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Old 7th November 2018, 05:27 AM
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Woohoo .here we go . Thanks IC .

Cheers
Santhosh

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Old 7th November 2018, 05:32 AM
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Default Settling in to Australia.

There are some names which linger in my mind and with my family are

IC
Gunbun
Keedaa

I really wonder the creativity of the people


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Old 7th November 2018, 05:56 AM
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SALARY GUIDE

While you are looking for work, Hay's international recruitment specialists puts out an annual salary guide, telling you the ranges of salaries for every industry in every city.
Consider the ranges as the following:
Lowest posted salary - graduate
highest - 20+ years experience

Use this to help estimate when negotiating salaries and planning your budget. Let me know if you can download the attachment. You may want to contact them to assist in looking for a job: https://www.hays.com.au/


https://www.paycalculator.com.au/
You can then use this pay calculator to estimate your after tax income to help you make a budget.

To help you figure out living costs for your budgeting, you can use these pages to estimate:
https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/managi...pending-habits - this is from the australian government, it doesn't take into specific cities but is an average.

https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/ - database of user input, it's good, but not always completely accurate.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf hays_1309100.pdf (1.04 MB, 76 views)

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Initial EOI: 01/2018 (60 points)
Updated EOI: 20/03/2018 (75 points)
ITA SC189: 21/03/2018
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Grant: 02/11/2018
Offshore Applicant
https://myimmitracker.com/signs/au/c...189/case-42813
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Old 7th November 2018, 06:29 AM
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Getting Settled in:

Temporary accommodation:
- hotels are generally expensive and only good for short holidays
- you could try hostels if you are single, or even with a family and get a private room are cheap alternative to hotels
- for longers stays and with families, try www.airbnb.com. People have apartments that they will rent out on a short-term commerical basis instead of a formal 1-year lease. These are good for anywhere from a few days up to a few months.
- www.roommates.com.au or www.flatshare.com.au you can find roommates to sublet from, some this is good for a few months or over a year, but generally for singles and couples, not families
- if you need to be really cheap, you can try https://www.couchsurfing.com/ . Where people will literally let you sleep on their couch if you need it. They generally don't demand money, but it's considered a nice jesture to either take them out for a meal/cook a meal or give a gift as gratitude. You will generally be expected to only be allowed in their house when they are there, for obvious security reasons. Security is more risky, but I have hosted people in my apartment in Dubai this way, and haven't had a problem as a host, and made some good friends from it. This is only acceptable for singles and couples. Would recommend for common sense security single women migrating not ask to couchshare at a single guy's apartment.
- AVOID classified websites like www.gumtree.com.au. This is great for buying used goods, but completely risky as someone getting off a an airplane as there is no recourse.

Long-term:
- in many cities due to rental laws it may be difficult to sign a lease until you have lived in Australia for 1 year, as they will expect you to provide Australian credit reference as well as personal references from your stays at previous residences.
- https://flatmates.com.au/ and Share Houses & Rooms For Rent are good websites to help find shared accommodation, this is good for your first year as mentioned above.
- at this stage you could try gumtree.com.au for apartments as you already have a short-term accomodation and have time to look around.
- If you are able to sign a lease for at least 1 year - https://www.realestate.com.au is a good souce among others. Please be advised, many places require a 1-month to 6 weeks advance deposit check. After that rents are paid on a monthly basis. It's coming to do it online by bank transfers. Written cheques are not common anymore.
- If you are signing a lease, be aware in Australia apartments generally don't come with a stove/refrigerator/washing machine (In Canada this was common). You will have to purchase these, unless you find a fully furnished apartment.

Be advised, the generally advertised rental rates are on a PER WEEK basis, but rent is paid monthly.

FURNITURE & Appliances:
- www.gumtree.com.au - until you buy a place, or know you will stay renting in an apartment for a long-time, you may want to buy your furniture used/second hand. This is the most popular site where people advertise anything and everything for free. Obviously it's buyer beware, but you can arrange to meet up to go look the furniture/appliance.
- Op Shops/Salvation army - are stores that are run by charities selling second hand clothes and furniture to raise money for the poor. People have donated their goods to them and it's generally been vetted by the store as having some quality/is sanitary to sell.
- Target/Big W/Kmart - are the largest discount stores in the country if you are on a budget but want to buy things new. They sell everything from clothes, makeup, appliances, sporting goods, toys.

FOOD/Personal goods:
- Food is generally quite expensive in Australia. If you try to bring in food when you first fly in, check the border control website as many food goods are banned to prevent disease, unless pre-approved/screened by the authorities - not worth it for an individual family.
- Also check if any non-food items may also be banned, there's some wood items they won't allow in.
- Supermarkets are in all the main suburbs. Coles and Woolworths are the two national chains. They are also the most expensive. Aldi's is a much smaller chain, and usually only has 1 or 2 shops in the cities and is usually located in or close to the CBD. If you are close to an Aldi's it's much cheaper than Coles and Wooldworths.
- IGAs (Independent Groceries Association) - these are smaller than that big supermarkets, but larger than a convenience store, and are located in more suburbs. Prices can vary between items in terms of being more or less expensive than the supermarket.
- Local Markets - These are generally the cheapest. They are local farmers markets, and usually only open on the weekends. These are less available, so you may have to travel further to get to one than to a supermarket, but you can save money. Just be a aware some Markets are more for tourists, which means the prices will be higher, so look around.
- Discount Chemist/Chemist Warehouse - go here for your toothbrushes/toothpaste/deodorant/makeup etc. it's cheaper than the supermarkets.
- For non-western people, most of the large cities certain suburbs attract more of certain nationalities - i.e. a few suburbs you'll find a higher concentration of stores and services run by indians/pakistanis/bangalis , or for chinese/korean/japanes in another suburb. You'll find delicious and more affordable restaurants here as well as shops that will be more affordable if you are looking for certain foods from your home country. Coles and Woolworths, may have some pre-packaged stuff, but it won't be as fresh as it was bought in bulk for all their stores.

__________________
ANZCO: 233211
Initial EOI: 01/2018 (60 points)
Updated EOI: 20/03/2018 (75 points)
ITA SC189: 21/03/2018
Lodged: 27/03/2018
Grant: 02/11/2018
Offshore Applicant
https://myimmitracker.com/signs/au/c...189/case-42813

Last edited by internationalcanuck; 7th November 2018 at 06:45 AM.
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Old 7th November 2018, 06:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by internationalcanuck View Post
I got a pay as you go local sim card until I settle into a more permanent house. Afterwards I will switch to a contract plan that is cheaper. Getting prepaid sim card was simple, just bring your passport to the shop. I went with Telstra. They aren't the cheapest, but have the largest national network coverage. All calls between mobile phones are free, no long distance charges calling between mobile phones. Compared to Canada or the UAE, the mobile plan packages are really good.
The major mobile phone service providers are Telstra, Vodafone, Optus, Virgin. There's many other smaller providers that provide different plans, but they will either connect to the telstra, optus or vodafone networks.
Don't just go into the stores, but check out some comparison websites firsts, like - https://www.canstarblue.com.au to get any idea of what kind of services each phone plans provide from different carriers. You can then go into the stores and check for any further deals.
I have lived in Australia for a while now and ended up getting a SIM from Aldi. You don't have to sign a contract and can switch between their different value packs whenever you want. They have the best inclusions I could find for the lowest price and a very reliable network (Telstra).

I'm currently paying $25 per 30 days and get 6GB of data with unlimited rollover (plans from other providers might rollover once).

Apart from unlimited standard calls to national fixed lines, mobiles and voicemail and unlimited national SMS to other Australian mobiles you get unlimited international calls and unlimited SMS to: Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Japan, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Korea, Thailand, UK, USA.

You also get 100 minutes of international calls to landlines and mobiles and 50 SMS to other countries like Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Cyprus, Denmark, Greece, Guam, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Malaysia, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Singapore, South Africa, Spain and Sweden.

What you do not get is a mobile phone but it's cheaper to buy an unlocked handset or use the one you already have than go for a plan that includes it.

I thought the unlimited international calls and SMS to Canada might appeal to you and as there are so many forum members from India and Pakistan the unlimited calls to their countries would be good for them too.

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