Settling in to Australia. - Page 4

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Life in Australia This new forum is for those generalized discussions about what it's like to actually live and work in Australia. Please post visa-processing, employment and travel-related questions in the main forum - but here you can meet fellow expats and discuss various aspects of your new life in Australia.

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Settling in to Australia. - Page 4


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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 13th November 2018, 05:50 AM
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Can you give me an account of finding an accommodation which is not shared. We are family of 4 and would like to have a place for ourselves even though a small one. In Delhi, we live in a 2 BHK apartment in a gated housing society, so something similar. Cost per month and other things to keep in my such as distance from major utilities that we require such as schools, doctors, grocery and other markets. We are planning for Sydney but would get a hint nonetheless.
Thank you for taking out time to reply to all those posts.

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 04:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by internationalcanuck View Post
Put it this way, you have a job, but you worry about losing it (even though nothing it telling you that you're going to lose your job). You have a job, so there's nothing you can do to alleviate the worry.

But let's say the next day you do lose your job... horrible and sad, but what would you do? well you'd have things to do to deal with the worry of now not having a job, you'd be updating your resume, looking for jobs, going to interviews, making a budget to save your money until you find work again.
I agree with your general premise that positive thinking is in itself good. We're not all equal; some people are more positive than others and it's not always a matter of convincing yourself that you should be positive (our brains are wired differently).

There is a difference between chronically worrying (in general) and risk management. You may not worry about something happening but having savings for various unfortunate events is a way to mitigate the severity of the consequences.

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Can you give me an account of finding an accommodation which is not shared.
Off topic, maybe? Anyway, I hope you realise you're asking a very broad question. I think your best bet is to try real estate websites (realestate.com.au, domain.com.au...) to get an idea.

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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 05:48 AM
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I agree with your general premise that positive thinking is in itself good. We're not all equal; some people are more positive than others and it's not always a matter of convincing yourself that you should be positive (our brains are wired differently).

There is a difference between chronically worrying (in general) and risk management. You may not worry about something happening but having savings for various unfortunate events is a way to mitigate the severity of the consequences.


Off topic, maybe? Anyway, I hope you realise you're asking a very broad question. I think your best bet is to try real estate websites (realestate.com.au, domain.com.au...) to get an idea.
I know this is broader than it appears. Did try on real estate websites, have some idea now. This is something that would be clear once I am there I guess. Thanks.

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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 07:57 AM
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I think it's the balance. Trying to be positive can feel like faking it, especially when there is the unknown. Let's say, waiting for your visa grant, you're super positive/hopeful but then get rejected and you're devestated, or you're super negative panicking and it's affecting your life for months waiting, but then you get your grant and are happy. But then you get into a cycle of now worrying about all the preparation, worrying about finding a job, both extremes of emotion aren't healthy.

The worrying can't change what's coming ahead. You have to deal with it anyways.
I'm working on that. Instead of predicting every single outcome and how to deal with it and the emotion (which causes worry), I'm trying to think along of setting mental checkpoints at which time you realistically assess you situation based on new information, then make a decision how to proceed. I get into periods where I panic about my career, but I really need to work at stepping back from the emotion, and just set checkpoints, it's helped a lot, things you can take to other aspects of life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phlojo View Post
I agree with your general premise that positive thinking is in itself good. We're not all equal; some people are more positive than others and it's not always a matter of convincing yourself that you should be positive (our brains are wired differently).

There is a difference between chronically worrying (in general) and risk management. You may not worry about something happening but having savings for various unfortunate events is a way to mitigate the severity of the consequences.


Off topic, maybe? Anyway, I hope you realise you're asking a very broad question. I think your best bet is to try real estate websites (realestate.com.au, domain.com.au...) to get an idea.
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 08:13 AM
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For short-term accomodation for initial arrival so you have a place for your things, I'd recommend airbnb.com. People will own and apartment, or even their own, but want to rent it out for short-term accomodation, i.e. anything from 1-night to 6months, but it's commercial contract like a hotel room and not like renting an apartment. I'm staying in one now.

Staying in an airbnb also means you have more choices over residential neighbourhoods to stay where most hotels are near the CBD and therefore be expensive. For airbnb I'd recommend getting one in the CBD (more expensive) or one near the CBD (within 10km or around 20min. train ride) and find one near a train station (within 1km walk). Anything further out or not near a train station, your wife and children will feel isolated without a car, your long commute could be difficult for job interviews as well as eating into time that lets you explore suburbs for you to settled down long-term. Further out you will have less shopping options as the outer suburbs tend to require you need a car to live there.

Being new to the country, it could be difficult to sign a contract for a 1 year aparemtn lease, as some states require you to have credit history and address history/references in australia before renting. You could try to negotiate this by offering to pay a higher initial deposit.

Hope that helps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saifsd View Post
Can you give me an account of finding an accommodation which is not shared. We are family of 4 and would like to have a place for ourselves even though a small one. In Delhi, we live in a 2 BHK apartment in a gated housing society, so something similar. Cost per month and other things to keep in my such as distance from major utilities that we require such as schools, doctors, grocery and other markets. We are planning for Sydney but would get a hint nonetheless.
Thank you for taking out time to reply to all those posts.
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Offshore Applicant
https://myimmitracker.com/signs/au/c...189/case-42813
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by internationalcanuck View Post
I think it's the balance. Trying to be positive can feel like faking it, especially when there is the unknown. Let's say, waiting for your visa grant, you're super positive/hopeful but then get rejected and you're devestated, or you're super negative panicking and it's affecting your life for months waiting, but then you get your grant and are happy. But then you get into a cycle of now worrying about all the preparation, worrying about finding a job, both extremes of emotion aren't healthy.

The worrying can't change what's coming ahead. You have to deal with it anyways.
I'm working on that. Instead of predicting every single outcome and how to deal with it and the emotion (which causes worry), I'm trying to think along of setting mental checkpoints at which time you realistically assess you situation based on new information, then make a decision how to proceed. I get into periods where I panic about my career, but I really need to work at stepping back from the emotion, and just set checkpoints, it's helped a lot, things you can take to other aspects of life.
It's very hard to stop worrying, I think that is my problem too. Never kept me healthy.
The checkpoint theory should work. I try to keep myself positive but get into my shell once anything 'worrying' happens...migration is one such thing but a thing worth all the worry.

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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 09:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by internationalcanuck View Post
For short-term accomodation for initial arrival so you have a place for your things, I'd recommend airbnb.com. People will own and apartment, or even their own, but want to rent it out for short-term accomodation, i.e. anything from 1-night to 6months, but it's commercial contract like a hotel room and not like renting an apartment. I'm staying in one now.

Staying in an airbnb also means you have more choices over residential neighbourhoods to stay where most hotels are near the CBD and therefore be expensive. For airbnb I'd recommend getting one in the CBD (more expensive) or one near the CBD (within 10km or around 20min. train ride) and find one near a train station (within 1km walk). Anything further out or not near a train station, your wife and children will feel isolated without a car, your long commute could be difficult for job interviews as well as eating into time that lets you explore suburbs for you to settled down long-term. Further out you will have less shopping options as the outer suburbs tend to require you need a car to live there.

Being new to the country, it could be difficult to sign a contract for a 1 year aparemtn lease, as some states require you to have credit history and address history/references in australia before renting. You could try to negotiate this by offering to pay a higher initial deposit.

Hope that helps.
Yes it does help.
How much is the normal initial deposit. In India the tradition is one month additional rent as advance...

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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 11:47 AM
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It depends on every state. When I last lived in Melbourne the standard was 6 weeks, but some states are less, some are more.
Also one shock for me coming from Canada, when I came to Melbourne between 2008-2013, People looking for apartments actually Bid UP rental prices because the competition was so fierce for renters. I don't know if that's the case now, but never heard of that in Canada of renters begging to pay more money for rental apartment since it's not an investment, it seemed strange.

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Yes it does help.
How much is the normal initial deposit. In India the tradition is one month additional rent as advance...
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 11:50 AM
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It depends on every state. When I last lived in Melbourne the standard was 6 weeks, but some states are less, some are more.
Also one shock for me coming from Canada, when I came to Melbourne between 2008-2013, People looking for apartments actually Bid UP rental prices because the competition was so fierce for renters. I don't know if that's the case now, but never heard of that in Canada of renters begging to pay more money for rental apartment since it's not an investment, it seemed strange.
Ha ha ...Strange. I've never seen that in Delhi where there is a huge population on rent.

Also, as a percentage of salary I am probably paying about 15-18% as rent. If I think about Sydney or Melbourne I estimate that to go up to 40% or more. This is so annoying for a place looking for people to occupy the territory and get rid of loneliness down under...

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Last edited by Saif; 14th November 2018 at 11:55 AM.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 14th November 2018, 12:11 PM
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You worry because you originally have hopefully expectations, but then you think about all the things that could go wrong. This is how obsurd our working is because we fixate on one thing that could derail our plans that makes us feel like a failure but yet if we take it to the extrem of things to worry about, but I bet you don't, lets say you get a visa:
- maybe you get in a car accident on the way to the airport and require hospital treatment or worse die
- the plane crashes
- there's an error in your electronic immigration, and they deny you
- you die travelling between the airport and your accomodation
- your family member gets horrible ill that's not covered by the public healthcare system
- your children don't adjust well in school, and fail, they become later
unemployed/criminal behaviour
- You could be walking down the street in Melbourne and there is an Muslim Terrorist attack.
- you come to australia you can't stand the culture, or your wife is unhappy, everything is too expensive (obviously not true and is a stereotype, since people still manage to live here, save money and retire)
Alternatively, you don't go to Australia, many of those things could occur. The rupee could drop in value, there could be mammoth inflation, etc.
...my point is thinking about all the negative things isn't a solution, it is just a never ending hole. The best you can do is make a level headed decision based on the information you know, and decide when to re-assess it, you are less likely to punish yourself emotionally like its a bade decision, since you only knew the information you had at the original time.

You have really no way of knowing whether Australia will be the best choice forever, because you cannot predict the alternative. Australia was a good choice for me for 5 years, they I left for 5 years and came back.

The best level headed thing I could say is, how long would you be willing to give Australia a go, and what disappointments could you put up with before you decide it's too much and go home? Maybe it's 3 months, maybe 6 months...but remember after you arrive and say in a bad case it doesn't work, you still go back to india, you still basically have several years before you'd need to go back to Australia again to keep your PR active until you're in a better position to come back permanently.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saifsd View Post
It's very hard to stop worrying, I think that is my problem too. Never kept me healthy.
The checkpoint theory should work. I try to keep myself positive but get into my shell once anything 'worrying' happens...migration is one such thing but a thing worth all the worry.
Saif likes this.

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ITA SC189: 21/03/2018
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Grant: 02/11/2018
Offshore Applicant
https://myimmitracker.com/signs/au/c...189/case-42813
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