Challenges Faced As a Newly Arrived Migrant in Australia

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Challenges Faced As a Newly Arrived Migrant in Australia


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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 17th October 2018, 01:09 PM
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Default Challenges Faced As a Newly Arrived Migrant in Australia

Challenges Faced As a Newly Arrived Migrant in Australia

Migrating to a new country and starting life all over again is never easy and each migrant will have a unique set of conditions which in turn will create specific challenges. Most of us (by us, I am referring to migrants who have moved to Australia off late and have gone through the entire process of vias application, migration, settling in, job search etc.). Listed below are some of these challenges.

Cost of Living
The biggest challenge most people face when they first arrive in Australia is the cost of living. The cost of living in Sydney is one of the highest in the world. A recent study conducted by UBS ranks Sydney as the ninth most expensive city in the world, which can be tough for migrants coming in from developing countries. When you arrive initially, it is but natural to convert the cost of every item to your home currency and then have a nervous breakdown when you compare the cost of every transaction to the prices back home. It all changes when you start getting a regular income. Australians, after all, get one of the highest minimum wages in the world.

QUICK FACT
Here are some average living costs in Sydney (Source - Numbeo)
1 Pair of Jeans (Levis 501 Or Similar) - $102.92
Rent per month for apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre - $2,527.31
Chicken Breasts (Boneless, Skinless), (1kg) - $11.12
Banana (1kg) - $3.02
Tomato (1kg) - $4.63
Potato (1kg) - $2.73
Basic (Electricity, Heating, Water, Garbage) for 85m2 Apartment - $168.67 per month
McMeal at McDonalds (or Equivalent Combo Meal) - $10.00
Cappuccino (regular) - $3.76
Coke/Pepsi (0.33 liter bottle) - $3.21
Average Monthly Disposable Salary (Net After Tax) - $4,558.14

Language Barriers
A larger part of the migrant population that comes to Australia each year is now predominantly from Asia where English is not necessarily the first language. Hence, one of the major challenges faced is learning effective English speaking.
Being able to communicate (or not) affects every area of life in which we have to interact with others. From jobs to schooling, to simply finding your way around or buying food, learning a native language is essential. Fortunately, Australia offers a lot of support for new arrivals to address this issue.

QUICK FACT:
Almost 6 million migrants, born in over 200 countries, live in Australia.
People born in the United Kingdom continued to be the largest group of overseas-born residents, accounting for 1.2 million people. The next largest group was born in New Zealand with 544,000 people, followed by China (380,000 people), India (341,000) and Italy (216,000).

Employment and Lack of Local Experience
Another factor that new immigrants are unaware of is that most organisations want to hire candidates with local experience. This means that migrants will face a tougher time acquiring a job if they go head to head with locally experienced candidates Ė especially in jobs related to teaching, advertising, communications and banking. In most cases, migrants will eventually get a job, but they will have to take up interim jobs in the meanwhile, to keep up with the cost of living. Donít get disheartened just yet.

Possible Loneliness
Loneliness is prevalent among people who come from bustling towns, especially from highly populated countries such as China and India. Australia is a huge country and most of the country is sparsely populated. However, the size of the population and its density is not the actual issue. At its core is the feeling of alienation and having no local friends or support system to reach out to, at least initially. Remember, all migrants start out this way. How quickly you build a network and build a friend circle will all depend on your initiative and how much you socialise. You better learn to fire up the BBQ Grill quickly!

QUICK TIP:
Accept your new situation and find a way to integrate into your new Ďlocalí conditions by absorbing ways that things are done here. Join local community groups and clubs to overcome feelings of loneliness when you first enter Australia.

No official recognition of overseas qualifications
A very common challenge faced by migrants is that their overseas qualifications are not recognised in Australia unless authenticated by an Australian organisation. Most local employers may have never heard of the relevant Indian or Chinese university, for example, and this is quite understandable.

Cultural differences
This is not necessarily the first on the list of practical considerations for immigrants. However, many immigrants report that on arrival, it is the cultural differences that really make a big impression. This can range from social customs to more significant issues such as attitudes towards gender, religious diversity, ethnicity and sexuality, which can all be vastly different in a new country. This can raise a host of problems for both immigrants and the people they interact with. It can also lead to a sense of isolation for immigrants. It is important to accept that values will be different and that this is something that you cannot control. Accepting different values doesn't mean you have to take them on as your own but you may need to learn to respect them in others.


QUICK FACT:
Australia is a religiously diverse country and it has no official religion.
Christianity is the predominant faith of Australia. In the 2011 census, 61.1% of the population classified themselves as being affiliated with the Christian faith.
The second-largest group and the one which had grown the fastest was the 22.3% who claimed to have no religion.
Minority religions practised in Australia include Buddhism (2.5% of the population), Islam (2.2%), Hinduism (1.3%) and Judaism (0.5%).

Moving with Children
Parents may experience certain challenges when bringing their children to a new country. Children may either quickly immerse in the new culture or take a long time to integrate with the local community.
Parents will also face the challenge of looking for schools, dealing with the new education systems, the differences in style of teaching and the apprehension of making friends with the local children and their parents.
With regards to school, parents often feel disappointed to see their children struggling to keep up in class, and many parents report bullying and discrimination as a result of cultural differences. Kids are often placed by their age rather than by their ability, and for those who are unable to speak English, itís virtually impossible to keep up. To add further insult to injury, parents may not have the education or language skills to assist their children, and they may not be able to communicate with faculty to address the problem.

Transportation
Access to transportation can be essential, in that, it will make access to education and employment far easier. Immigrants face particular problems in this respect on two levels. Firstly, your driverís licence may not be recognised in your new country, which means there may be costs associated with becoming qualified. Secondly, that language barrier can, again, make understanding or even finding useful local public transit services a hard task. Initially, it is normally possible to drive using your home-country licence, but eventually, you will need to change it to the national licence. Public transit timetables can be challenging as well, at least for the first few months until you settle down.

The good news is that the more time you spend in Australia, the easier the road becomes. Before you know it you would have overcome your challenges and reaping the rewards of moving to this beautiful country. My advice to new arrivals - Do not hesitate to ask for help. We are a nation of migrants and for the larger part most of us believe that 'One Good Turn Deserves Another'

So what are the challenges you have faced as a new arrival in Australia?

All the best!

__________________
Cheers,
Jason
www.migrantninja.com.au
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Old 17th October 2018, 11:50 PM
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In my experience, as a parent, finding a rental home in a good school catchment area was a daunting process. I spent five weeks and finally settled for a 2 bedder, 1.5 bath granny flat, but not regretting the decision- cheap, easy on maintenance, and just 5 minutes walk to the school. Finding a job in just 2 weeks was easier than this!
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Old 18th October 2018, 05:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonrebello View Post
Challenges Faced As a Newly Arrived Migrant in Australia

Migrating to a new country and starting life all over again is never easy and each migrant will have a unique set of conditions which in turn will create specific challenges. Most of us (by us, I am referring to migrants who have moved to Australia off late and have gone through the entire process of vias application, migration, settling in, job search etc.). Listed below are some of these challenges.

Cost of Living
The biggest challenge most people face when they first arrive in Australia is the cost of living. The cost of living in Sydney is one of the highest in the world. A recent study conducted by UBS ranks Sydney as the ninth most expensive city in the world, which can be tough for migrants coming in from developing countries. When you arrive initially, it is but natural to convert the cost of every item to your home currency and then have a nervous breakdown when you compare the cost of every transaction to the prices back home. It all changes when you start getting a regular income. Australians, after all, get one of the highest minimum wages in the world.

QUICK FACT
Here are some average living costs in Sydney (Source - Numbeo)
1 Pair of Jeans (Levis 501 Or Similar) - $102.92
Rent per month for apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre - $2,527.31
Chicken Breasts (Boneless, Skinless), (1kg) - $11.12
Banana (1kg) - $3.02
Tomato (1kg) - $4.63
Potato (1kg) - $2.73
Basic (Electricity, Heating, Water, Garbage) for 85m2 Apartment - $168.67 per month
McMeal at McDonalds (or Equivalent Combo Meal) - $10.00
Cappuccino (regular) - $3.76
Coke/Pepsi (0.33 liter bottle) - $3.21
Average Monthly Disposable Salary (Net After Tax) - $4,558.14

Language Barriers
A larger part of the migrant population that comes to Australia each year is now predominantly from Asia where English is not necessarily the first language. Hence, one of the major challenges faced is learning effective English speaking.
Being able to communicate (or not) affects every area of life in which we have to interact with others. From jobs to schooling, to simply finding your way around or buying food, learning a native language is essential. Fortunately, Australia offers a lot of support for new arrivals to address this issue.

QUICK FACT:
Almost 6 million migrants, born in over 200 countries, live in Australia.
People born in the United Kingdom continued to be the largest group of overseas-born residents, accounting for 1.2 million people. The next largest group was born in New Zealand with 544,000 people, followed by China (380,000 people), India (341,000) and Italy (216,000).

Employment and Lack of Local Experience
Another factor that new immigrants are unaware of is that most organisations want to hire candidates with local experience. This means that migrants will face a tougher time acquiring a job if they go head to head with locally experienced candidates Ė especially in jobs related to teaching, advertising, communications and banking. In most cases, migrants will eventually get a job, but they will have to take up interim jobs in the meanwhile, to keep up with the cost of living. Donít get disheartened just yet.

Possible Loneliness
Loneliness is prevalent among people who come from bustling towns, especially from highly populated countries such as China and India. Australia is a huge country and most of the country is sparsely populated. However, the size of the population and its density is not the actual issue. At its core is the feeling of alienation and having no local friends or support system to reach out to, at least initially. Remember, all migrants start out this way. How quickly you build a network and build a friend circle will all depend on your initiative and how much you socialise. You better learn to fire up the BBQ Grill quickly!

QUICK TIP:
Accept your new situation and find a way to integrate into your new Ďlocalí conditions by absorbing ways that things are done here. Join local community groups and clubs to overcome feelings of loneliness when you first enter Australia.

No official recognition of overseas qualifications
A very common challenge faced by migrants is that their overseas qualifications are not recognised in Australia unless authenticated by an Australian organisation. Most local employers may have never heard of the relevant Indian or Chinese university, for example, and this is quite understandable.

Cultural differences
This is not necessarily the first on the list of practical considerations for immigrants. However, many immigrants report that on arrival, it is the cultural differences that really make a big impression. This can range from social customs to more significant issues such as attitudes towards gender, religious diversity, ethnicity and sexuality, which can all be vastly different in a new country. This can raise a host of problems for both immigrants and the people they interact with. It can also lead to a sense of isolation for immigrants. It is important to accept that values will be different and that this is something that you cannot control. Accepting different values doesn't mean you have to take them on as your own but you may need to learn to respect them in others.


QUICK FACT:
Australia is a religiously diverse country and it has no official religion.
Christianity is the predominant faith of Australia. In the 2011 census, 61.1% of the population classified themselves as being affiliated with the Christian faith.
The second-largest group and the one which had grown the fastest was the 22.3% who claimed to have no religion.
Minority religions practised in Australia include Buddhism (2.5% of the population), Islam (2.2%), Hinduism (1.3%) and Judaism (0.5%).

Moving with Children
Parents may experience certain challenges when bringing their children to a new country. Children may either quickly immerse in the new culture or take a long time to integrate with the local community.
Parents will also face the challenge of looking for schools, dealing with the new education systems, the differences in style of teaching and the apprehension of making friends with the local children and their parents.
With regards to school, parents often feel disappointed to see their children struggling to keep up in class, and many parents report bullying and discrimination as a result of cultural differences. Kids are often placed by their age rather than by their ability, and for those who are unable to speak English, itís virtually impossible to keep up. To add further insult to injury, parents may not have the education or language skills to assist their children, and they may not be able to communicate with faculty to address the problem.

Transportation
Access to transportation can be essential, in that, it will make access to education and employment far easier. Immigrants face particular problems in this respect on two levels. Firstly, your driverís licence may not be recognised in your new country, which means there may be costs associated with becoming qualified. Secondly, that language barrier can, again, make understanding or even finding useful local public transit services a hard task. Initially, it is normally possible to drive using your home-country licence, but eventually, you will need to change it to the national licence. Public transit timetables can be challenging as well, at least for the first few months until you settle down.

The good news is that the more time you spend in Australia, the easier the road becomes. Before you know it you would have overcome your challenges and reaping the rewards of moving to this beautiful country. My advice to new arrivals - Do not hesitate to ask for help. We are a nation of migrants and for the larger part most of us believe that 'One Good Turn Deserves Another'

So what are the challenges you have faced as a new arrival in Australia?

All the best!

Brilliant post... abundant details for new migrants.

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Old 19th October 2018, 03:13 AM
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I've found getting a job harder than expected. I'm fairly senior, and the problem I face is that the roles I fit are slow burners. We're talking months for the process (e.g. I started engaging on a couple of roles in May, and am still going through the "conversations" stage.) I can take a contracting role, but at my level these are infrequent and mostly for cookie-cutter resources who get swapped out regularly. For those who are >10 years experience, be aware that Australia moves slooooowwwwwllllyyyyyy.

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Old 19th October 2018, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FFacs View Post
I've found getting a job harder than expected. I'm fairly senior, and the problem I face is that the roles I fit are slow burners. We're talking months for the process (e.g. I started engaging on a couple of roles in May, and am still going through the "conversations" stage.) I can take a contracting role, but at my level these are infrequent and mostly for cookie-cutter resources who get swapped out regularly. For those who are >10 years experience, be aware that Australia moves slooooowwwwwllllyyyyyy.
Hi FFacs,

That is true. I was told by one migrant who helped me when I first moved in to treat the settlement process, including getting a job, like a marathon, not a sprint. The key here is to pace yourself, take what comes your way, focus on ways to market your skills and to wait for the opportune moment to come along. I moved in with two decades of experience but none of that actually mattered in the initial stages. It took me three job swaps (one of them as a casual employee) and nearly three years before I was able to get a job that I can say does justice to my overseas experience.

I wish you all the best with your current application and hope it moves to the 'selection' phase soonest.

Good Luck,
Jason

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Jason
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