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Isla Verde 12th January 2016 12:48 AM

Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Meritorious-MasoMenos (Post 9130426)
The gov't 15-minute video of the assault is riveting. "Hands up!" Then bang, bang, bang right after. Many news organizations in U.S. link to it.
What was semi-hilarious was to hear leader of the assault team shouting the Mexican warning "aguas, aguas!" before busting into one room.
I've heard a few South Americans asking Mexicans in wonder over that phrase and its derivation, and I imagine South Americans watching this video scratching their heads, seeing no water in sight.

Here's an explanation of what "¡Aguas!" means in Mexican Spanish:

"Viene de la época de la Colonia y se usaba para avisarles a los peatones que tuvieran cuidado con las aguas sucias que iban a tirar desde los balcones (no había alcantarillado)." La expresión "Aguas" | WordReference Forums [My translation: "It comes from the Colonial period and was used to warn pedestrians to watch out for the dirty water that was about to be thrown from balconies (there were no sewers)."]

ojosazules11 12th January 2016 03:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Isla Verde (Post 9130450)
Here's an explanation of what "¡Aguas!" means in Mexican Spanish:

"Viene de la época de la Colonia y se usaba para avisarles a los peatones que tuvieran cuidado con las aguas sucias que iban a tirar desde los balcones (no había alcantarillado)." La expresión "Aguas" | WordReference Forums [My translation: "It comes from the Colonial period and was used to warn pedestrians to watch out for the dirty water that was about to be thrown from balconies (there were no sewers)."]

Thanks for that tidbit, Isla. I've used ¡Aguas! as an interjection for "Watch out!" for years without ever wondering where it came from. (Any more than I would wonder where "Hola" came from...) Now I'll always have an interesting visual when I use or hear the phrase.

I also was not aware that it isn't used throughout Latin America in this sense. It definitely is in Central America.

ojosazules11 12th January 2016 11:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9131098)
Thanks for that tidbit, Isla. I've used ¡Aguas! as an interjection for "Watch out!" for years without ever wondering where it came from. (Any more than I would wonder where "Hola" came from...) Now I'll always have an interesting visual when I use or hear the phrase.

I also was not aware that it isn't used throughout Latin America in this sense. It definitely is in Central America.

I was just speaking with a Venezuelan friend. She said in Venezuela "¡Aguas!" is understood because the Mexican TV show "El Chavo del Ocho" is very popular there. Sometimes they'll even use the term in Venezuela jokingly. The equivalent saying in Venezuela is "¡Mosca!" As in "¡Mosca, mosca! Ahí viene la maestra!" ("Watch out! The teacher's coming") She has no idea the origins of this use of "mosca". Any idea, Isla?

Isla Verde 12th January 2016 11:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9140634)
I was just speaking with a Venezuelan friend. She said in Venezuela "¡Aguas!" is understood because the Mexican TV show "El Chavo del Ocho" is very popular there. Sometimes they'll even use the term in Venezuela jokingly. The equivalent saying in Venezuela is "¡Mosca!" As in "¡Mosca, mosca! Ahí viene la maestra!" ("Watch out! The teacher's coming") She has no idea the origins of this use of "mosca". Any idea, Isla?

I know nothing of Venezuelan slang. However, I have just found a discussion of idiomatic uses of "mosca" on the WordReference.com website, which may be of some use:

poner ponerse mosca | WordReference Forums

Meritorious-MasoMenos 12th January 2016 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9140634)
I was just speaking with a Venezuelan friend. She said in Venezuela "¡Aguas!" is understood because the Mexican TV show "El Chavo del Ocho" is very popular there. Sometimes they'll even use the term in Venezuela jokingly. The equivalent saying in Venezuela is "¡Mosca!" As in "¡Mosca, mosca! Ahí viene la maestra!" ("Watch out! The teacher's coming") She has no idea the origins of this use of "mosca". Any idea, Isla?

At least "aquas" is apparently somewhat respectable throughout the Spanish speaking world. Not to start a tangent, but I used to work with Mexican and South American journalists. Oh boy, did a "Che" come down on me when to a question of his, I innocently asked: "Mandé?" Oh, barbaric, he screamed. This group also translated English articles into Spanish, and I had to break up more than one fist fight between Mexican Spanish and what the Argentines and Chileans considered proper.

And of course there is "vos." I lived in Guatemala for three years and once was able to conjugate without thinking in spoken Spanish all tenses of vos, where "tu" was used by only one "segment" of the community, then illegal. Never made it to Argentina to show it off, alas.

Isla Verde 13th January 2016 12:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meritorious-MasoMenos (Post 9140786)
At least "aquas" is apparently somewhat respectable throughout the Spanish speaking world. Not to start a tangent, but I used to work with Mexican and South American journalists. Oh boy, did a "Che" come down on me when to a question of his, I innocently asked: "Mandé?" Oh, barbaric, he screamed.

¿Mande? is barbaric? It sounds like that journalist had a typical Argentinian superiority complex when it came to anything coming out of Mexico.

GARYJ65 13th January 2016 01:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Isla Verde (Post 9141018)
¿Mande? is barbaric? It sounds like that journalist had a typical Argentinian superiority complex when it came to anything coming out of Mexico.

Lately there is a tendency to quit using "mande"
When you come to think about it, it's not something one would like to say
Personally, I don't like to say that "mande"

Isla Verde 13th January 2016 02:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9141234)
Lately there is a tendency to quit using "mande"
When you come to think about it, it's not something one would like to say
Personally, I don't like to say that "mande"

It's always sounded a bit servile to me, but certainly not barbaric.

TundraGreen 13th January 2016 04:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9141234)
Lately there is a tendency to quit using "mande"
When you come to think about it, it's not something one would like to say
Personally, I don't like to say that "mande"

So what do people replace it with?

For the people who haven't encountered it yet, "Mande?" is a way of asking someone to repeat something you didn't hear or understand.

GARYJ65 13th January 2016 05:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TundraGreen (Post 9142370)
So what do people replace it with? For the people who haven't encountered it yet, "Mande?" is a way of asking someone to repeat something you didn't hear or understand.

Diga?
Perdone?
Cómo?

Mande literally is asking for someone to order you to do something

Some of us are just not up to that


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