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-   -   Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries (https://www.expatforum.com/expats/la-chatarrer/960642-spanish-expressions-mexico-other-countries.html)

xolo 18th January 2016 02:52 PM

The Spanish of Spain is not "correct and proper" Spanish (as opposed to everywhere else), that is an attitude from colonial times. Also, the Spanish of Spain is far from uniform, so you would have to specify which variety you're talking about anyway, but linguistically the Spanish of Spain (I assume the original comments referred to the northern half of the country) is distinct and not mainstream in the sense of numbers of speakers.
The Spanish of Mexico is close to the neutral core of the language and is excellent Spanish in the sense that many native Spanish speakers would find it easy to understand with "little accent". Also, fighting about these things and even words like "mande" is just a sign of ignorance. Argentina Spanish is definitely not mainstream, but again, there's nothing wrong with it, either.
Wow, so much slang from the 70s. EL QUIHÚBOLE. Only a Mexican would add that "le" at the end, got to love it.

Howler 18th January 2016 06:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9182194)
What about
Quihubo?
Quiúboles?

...or "¿Qué húbole mano?" (Sounds like "What grapes, hand?)

:)

Isla Verde 18th January 2016 06:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Howler (Post 9190506)
...or "¿Qué húbole mano?" (Sounds like "What grapes, hand?)

:)

In this case, mano = [her]mano .

ojosazules11 18th January 2016 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Howler (Post 9190506)
...or "¿Qué húbole mano?" (Sounds like "What grapes, hand?)

:)

Or 'mano in general - shortening of "hermano" - kind of like "bro" in English. So "¿Qué húbo mano?" is essentially like "What's up, bro?" (I'm sure you know this, Howler, I'm just translating for those who might not.)

(Oops - I see I cross-posted with Isla)

How about blanquillos for eggs?

ojosazules11 18th January 2016 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9180754)
What about "pendiente"
As in ... Estoy al pendiente
Me dejas con pendiente
Quedamos pendientes


Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9182650)
:confused:
Isn't pendiente a proper Spanish word? Or are these phrases using pendiente not regular Spanish?

I use pendiente in this way fairly frequently, and none of my South American friends have ever commented on this use, but maybe they understand what I mean by it and don't bother to comment.

Sigo al pendiente de una respuesta .... :confused:

Is pendiente really only used in this way in Mexico and Central America?

Meritorious-MasoMenos 19th January 2016 04:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xolo (Post 9188754)
The Spanish of Spain is not "correct and proper" Spanish (as opposed to everywhere else), that is an attitude from colonial times. Also, the Spanish of Spain is far from uniform, so you would have to specify which variety you're talking about anyway, but linguistically the Spanish of Spain (I assume the original comments referred to the northern half of the country) is distinct and not mainstream in the sense of numbers of speakers.
The Spanish of Mexico is close to the neutral core of the language and is excellent Spanish in the sense that many native Spanish speakers would find it easy to understand with "little accent". Also, fighting about these things and even words like "mande" is just a sign of ignorance. Argentina Spanish is definitely not mainstream, but again, there's nothing wrong with it, either.
Wow, so much slang from the 70s. EL QUIHÚBOLE. Only a Mexican would add that "le" at the end, got to love it.

Re: "Also, fighting about these things and even words like "mande" is just a sign of ignorance."

Well, I worked for 10 years in a place with both Mexicans and Argentines, and I say you doh't know anything about Latin America. It's a blood sport. And these are highly educated people, but quite willing to come to blows over "mande" and numerous other "real" Spanish or :ignorant" Spanish, depending on your point of view. I have no viewpoint, but I did have to break up fistfights, to emphasize again.

Also, what no one has mentioned in this train is the peculiar custom of people living in the Andalusian coast of Spain, where I lived for six glorious months [mostly the then unspoiled paradise of Nerja], and the coastal areas of Mexico especially Veracruz, Central America on the Caribbean coasts of Guatemala and Honduras, and all of El Salvador, and if I remember correctly, Costa Rica, but certainly low level Panama, and Columbia and Peru, and the tropical sea level countries of Cuba, Dominican Republic, all practically pulverize the final syllable, or rather, it just seems too hot to include.
I'm certainly no expert, and probably people more educated in the subject can point to studies why people on the coasts tend to jumble or leave off the final syllable, whether they just have more sense, knowing that everyone understands anyway, or it's just too hot or who knows.
I also think Guatemalans of Guatemala City and Antigua speak the most unaccented Spanish that my non-native ear has ever heard, much less sing-song than the Mexico City accent (that I love so much).
Again, I'm far from a linguist, but I've spent intense periods in Spain, Mexico, all Central American countries, Columbia, Peru and worked daily with Argentines and Chileans. The odd Bolivian or two. Love'em all.
But accent, accent, the most neutral "TV style" Spanish as in the neutral American TV voice, my opinion is Guatemalan high educated.

Howler 19th January 2016 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meritorious-MasoMenos (Post 9193666)
Well, I worked for 10 years in a place with both Mexicans and Argentines, and I say you doh't know anything about Latin America. It's a blood sport. And these are highly educated people, but quite willing to come to blows over "mande" and numerous other "real" Spanish or :ignorant" Spanish, depending on your point of view. I have no viewpoint, but I did have to break up fistfights, to emphasize again.

Too funny!! (except if you were in the middle, trying to break it up!)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Meritorious-MasoMenos (Post 9193666)
I'm certainly no expert, and probably people more educated in the subject can point to studies why people on the coasts tend to jumble or leave off the final syllable...

I still remember, now with amusement, one of my first greetings in/to Veracruz was "¿Como 'ta 'te'?" spoken so rapidly, it took a couple of repeats & help from a fellow gringo (who'd already been there for awhile) to realize what was being said. I also remember thinking that it was going to be a loooooong 2 years, trying to learn & practice the language under those conditions. Lol.

Speaking of "understandable accents" I was surprised how clear & understandable some newscasts were that I heard from Equatorial Guinea a couple of years ago. I don't know if that reflected the accent for the rest of that small African country.

ojosazules11 20th January 2016 04:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9180754)
What about "pendiente"
As in ... Estoy al pendiente
Me dejas con pendiente
Quedamos pendientes

Gary, I'm still confused as to your post implying that this use of pendiente is unique to Mexico. Just today I got a text message from a Venezuelan friend stating "Muchisimas gracias por estar pendiente y por su ayuda."

Can you clarify? Is pendiente used differently in Mexico than elsewhere?

GARYJ65 21st January 2016 12:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9205002)
Gary, I'm still confused as to your post implying that this use of pendiente is unique to Mexico. Just today I got a text message from a Venezuelan friend stating "Muchisimas gracias por estar pendiente y por su ayuda."

Can you clarify? Is pendiente used differently in Mexico than elsewhere?

I really don't know about that, just thought of some commonly used word

Some words are used in different Countries, but we have to be careful, meanings change A LOT

ojosazules11 21st January 2016 04:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9214538)
I really don't know about that, just thought of some commonly used word

Some words are used in different Countries, but we have to be careful, meanings change A LOT

Thanks, Gary. Yes, indeed. A perfectly innocent word in one country (like "chucha" for female dog in Guatemala) can mean something completely different, and not so innocent, in other countries (e.g. Bolivia uses the word "chucha" for part of the female anatomy). I learned not to say the phrase commonly used in Guatemala "¡Ah, la gran chucha!" when I'm with people from other Spanish-speaking countries.


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