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-   -   Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries (https://www.expatforum.com/expats/la-chatarrer/960642-spanish-expressions-mexico-other-countries.html)

TJGUY 17th January 2016 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meritorious-MasoMenos (Post 9171682)
And then once you start socializing with Spanish-speaking women, you pick up other phrases they don't teach in language school:

Que te vayas! [Que te vaaaaay-as!]
Largate de aqui! AHORITA!!

Lol! Don't forget "Mendigo!"

GARYJ65 17th January 2016 08:35 PM

What about "pendiente"
As in ... Estoy al pendiente
Me dejas con pendiente
Quedamos pendientes

RVGRINGO 17th January 2016 08:37 PM

That seems like, “adding insult to injury“.

GARYJ65 18th January 2016 02:38 AM

What about
Quihubo?
Quiúboles?

Isla Verde 18th January 2016 02:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9182194)
What about
Quihubo?
Quiúboles?

Essential Mexican Spanish! Any difference in meaning or emphasis between them?

GARYJ65 18th January 2016 02:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Isla Verde (Post 9182210)
Essential Mexican Spanish! Any difference in meaning or emphasis between them?

None

ojosazules11 18th January 2016 04:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9180490)
Sleepover would perfectly be a "Pijamada"

Thanks, Gary. I'd completely forgotten that word...

ojosazules11 18th January 2016 04:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9180754)
What about "pendiente"
As in ... Estoy al pendiente
Me dejas con pendiente
Quedamos pendientes

:confused:
Isn't pendiente a proper Spanish word? Or are these phrases using pendiente not regular Spanish?

I use pendiente in this way fairly frequently, and none of my South American friends have ever commented on this use, but maybe they understand what I mean by it and don't bother to comment.

ojosazules11 18th January 2016 04:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Howler (Post 9180058)
... In Veracruz (near the port) there are a lot of local / regional expressions used there, usually based on a corruption of the pronunciations for different words... like "cuñao" for "cuñado". That ending "-ao" which sounds like "-ow" in English is a common variation used with the -ar verb past participles. Then sometimes I'll have a problem figuring out a word because the "s" get swallowed a lot in that area. I joke that the people speak like there's a machine gun in their mouths as to how rapidly they'll throw it all out. It enough of a problem sorting out what was said, in addition to the slang or folkloric expressions. Fun stuff, especially once my jaw unhinges & begins to keep up with it - then my wife makes fun of me for sounding like a fisherman or bus driver.

Is it something about being near the ocean? I find young men from the Spanish-speaking Caribbean among the hardest to understand because they talk very fast and swallow their consonants as if they were an essential nutrient! I don't have a problem understanding women from Cuba and the Dominican Republic, but I find that to understand the young men I really have to be watching their faces to catch everything. Normally I have no problem speaking Spanish on the phone, but with one good friend of ours from Cuba I have to keep asking him to repeat himself and slow down because he talks so fast and runs everything together, dropping sounds all over the place.

Isla Verde 18th January 2016 06:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9182770)
Is it something about being near the ocean? I find young men from the Spanish-speaking Caribbean among the hardest to understand because they talk very fast and swallow their consonants as if they were an essential nutrient! I don't have a problem understanding women from Cuba and the Dominican Republic, but I find that to understand the young men I really have to be watching their faces to catch everything. Normally I have no problem speaking Spanish on the phone, but with one good friend of ours from Cuba I have to keep asking him to repeat himself and slow down because he talks so fast and runs everything together, dropping sounds all over the place.

Yes, there is a Caribbean accent that can be very hard to understand. Spanish-speakers from this region speak very fast, leave off the final "s" on words, and often the pronunciation of "r" and "l" are interchanged. Even the grammar is a bit different from standard Spanish: for example, in questions with a question word, the subject and verb are not inverted (question word + verb + subject), as they are in most variants of the language, but instead go like this: question word + subject + verb. Here is a somewhat technical explanation from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caribbean_Spanish


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