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-   -   Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries (https://www.expatforum.com/expats/la-chatarrer/960642-spanish-expressions-mexico-other-countries.html)

GARYJ65 17th January 2016 05:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TundraGreen (Post 9175698)
How about: Simón (derivative of si = yes definitely) Abuelita de batman (= of course) It is always good for a laugh when I use the latter. It sounds very funny coming from a foreigner.

Those come from the 70's
The latter would be "agüelita de Batman" coming from a bad word

GARYJ65 17th January 2016 05:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9175778)
"Simón" is one I do use. Also "¡Nombre!" for "No way!" (No, hombre) I've always been amused that in English "Mensa" is a high IQ society, but in colloquial Spanish "mensa" means "dummy" or idiot (female, for male it would be "menso").

It would be like N'ombre kind of a contraction of the one you said "No hombre"

Isla Verde 17th January 2016 05:33 AM

In addition to "sale" for "OK" (as in "de acuerdo"), I've heard "vale", which I've also heard in Spain.

Meritorious-MasoMenos 17th January 2016 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9172818)
Wow
I have never been told those, what did you do to them?

I'm a charmer, I am.

ojosazules11 17th January 2016 01:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Isla Verde (Post 9175962)
In addition to "sale" for "OK" (as in "de acuerdo"), I've heard "vale", which I've also heard in Spain.

Or "Sale y vale" for extra emphasis.

Like "¡Aguas!" it seems this is another phrase which is at least known in other parts of Latin America due to the popularity of the TV show "El Chavo del Ocho".

salivale [ sale y vale ] (El Chavo) | WordReference Forums

Speaking of "chavo", that's another very common word you aren't likely to learn in.Spanish class. It means "guy" or young man (at least I don't recall hearing it used for older men). The female version is "chava". If my son is out with his girlfriend, I might say, "Anda con su chava". Admittedly that is very informal, and I would probably only use that phrasing with my husband. If speaking to anyone else I would say, "Salió con la novia." But if I'm asking a friend how her young adult children are, I would feel perfectly comfortable asking, "¿Cómo están los chavos?" The trick with using slang in a second language is having a feel for which contexts and with which people it's appropriate, and when to use more formal Spanish. If in doubt, don't use the slang.

If my daughter wants to invite her friends over for the night, it would be " Quiere invitar a todas las chavas para un 'sleepover'." - I don't know of a good Spanish word for "sleepover" so I resort to Spanglish. I know, I could say, "Para pasar la noche aquí." and I do say that. But I think one of the great things about having more than one language is a greater selection of words to choose from. Apologies to the purists...

Howler 17th January 2016 06:35 PM

In addition to "Simón" & "N'ombre" I remember & still use "Algodon" for "something (like that)". In Veracruz (near the port) there are a lot of local / regional expressions used there, usually based on a corruption of the pronunciations for different words... like "cuñao" for "cuñado". That ending "-ao" which sounds like "-ow" in English is a common variation used with the -ar verb past participles. Then sometimes I'll have a problem figuring out a word because the "s" get swallowed a lot in that area. I joke that the people speak like there's a machine gun in their mouths as to how rapidly they'll throw it all out. It enough of a problem sorting out what was said, in addition to the slang or folkloric expressions. Fun stuff, especially once my jaw unhinges & begins to keep up with it - then my wife makes fun of me for sounding like a fisherman or bus driver.

When I worked with the amnesty program of '86 back when we first got married, I'd get in trouble quite frequently (with my wife) for using expressions my clients used that turned out to be profane or vulgar. I'd say the most "profane" speakers I've run across are usually from Chile where every other word is seems like a vulgarity, but is everyday language to them. But then again, our beloved Mexico is full of double entendres & albures... :)

GARYJ65 17th January 2016 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9178458)
Or "Sale y vale" for extra emphasis. Like "¡Aguas!" it seems this is another phrase which is at least known in other parts of Latin America due to the popularity of the TV show "El Chavo del Ocho". salivale [ sale y vale ] (El Chavo) | WordReference Forums Speaking of "chavo", that's another very common word you aren't likely to learn in.Spanish class. It means "guy" or young man (at least I don't recall hearing it used for older men). The female version is "chava". If my son is out with his girlfriend, I might say, "Anda con su chava". Admittedly that is very informal, and I would probably only use that phrasing with my husband. If speaking to anyone else I would say, "Salió con la novia." But if I'm asking a friend how her young adult children are, I would feel perfectly comfortable asking, "¿Cómo están los chavos?" The trick with using slang in a second language is having a feel for which contexts and with which people it's appropriate, and when to use more formal Spanish. If in doubt, don't use the slang. If my daughter wants to invite her friends over for the night, it would be " Quiere invitar a todas las chavas para un 'sleepover'." - I don't know of a good Spanish word for "sleepover" so I resort to Spanglish. I know, I could say, "Para pasar la noche aquí." and I do say that. But I think one of the great things about having more than one language is a greater selection of words to choose from. Apologies to the purists...

Sleepover would perfectly be a "Pijamada"

TJGUY 17th January 2016 08:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Isla Verde (Post 9130450)
Here's an explanation of what "¡Aguas!" means in Mexican Spanish:

"Viene de la época de la Colonia y se usaba para avisarles a los peatones que tuvieran cuidado con las aguas sucias que iban a tirar desde los balcones (no había alcantarillado)." La expresión "Aguas" | WordReference Forums [My translation: "It comes from the Colonial period and was used to warn pedestrians to watch out for the dirty water that was about to be thrown from balconies (there were no sewers)."]

Common meaning of the word "Aguas! means "Watch out!" or "Careful!"

TJGUY 17th January 2016 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TundraGreen (Post 9142370)
So what do people replace it with?

For the people who haven't encountered it yet, "Mande?" is a way of asking someone to repeat something you didn't hear or understand.

Although "Mande" is alive and well it can be replaced with the word "Como?" or Perdon?

TJGUY 17th January 2016 08:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Isla Verde (Post 9169978)
I wonder why your teacher told you never to use "¿Mande?" Did you ever ask why?

I learned the Mande conundrum while in Colombia. I learned Spanish in Mexico . Then moved to Colombia. When using Mande I used to be chastised to the point I quit using it. After that I moved to Honduras. Oh great another form of Spanish to learn.

While in Colombia I traveled frequently to Ecuador where they also use the term Mande.
What the Colombians took offense to was by using the word you were becoming submissive to the person that you said it to. oh well. Live and learn.


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