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-   -   Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries (https://www.expatforum.com/expats/la-chatarrer/960642-spanish-expressions-mexico-other-countries.html)

Isla Verde 16th January 2016 01:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GARYJ65 (Post 9169554)
What would that difference be?

Americans do not deny being Americans, but they defend their European roots as if they just came down from the Mayflower

Not the Americans I know. You have some strange American friends, Gary! ;)

And the difference with these friends of yours and the Catalans I knew in Barcelona is that the Catalans didn't identify as Spanish and Catalan, but as Europeans and Catalans.

citlali 16th January 2016 04:32 AM

By the way I hear people using vos in Chiapas.I guess it comes from the times they were part of Guatemala.
when I started taking Spanish classes in Ajijic my Spanish teacher told me to never use "Mande" which was tough because everyone was saying Mande to me.
I worked for many years with the Torres wine family, Marimar and I shared an office and I can tell you Catalonian are a breed apart and hate Madrid. I used to go to Villafranca and Barcelona to work and Spanish was not spoken around me.

Isla Verde 16th January 2016 04:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by citlali (Post 9169970)
when I started taking Spanish classes in Ajijic my Spanish teacher told me to never use "Mande" which was tough because everyone was saying Mande to me.

I wonder why your teacher told you never to use "¿Mande?" Did you ever ask why?

TundraGreen 16th January 2016 05:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by citlali (Post 9169970)
By the way I hear people using vos in Chiapas.I guess it comes from the times they were part of Guatemala.
when I started taking Spanish classes in Ajijic my Spanish teacher told me to never use "Mande" which was tough because everyone was saying Mande to me.
I worked for many years with the Torres wine family, Marimar and I shared an office and I can tell you Catalonian are a breed apart and hate Madrid. I used to go to Villafranca and Barcelona to work and Spanish was not spoken around me.

I took Spanish classes for six years and it amazes me a little how many common expressions I only picked up by listening to people. They were never mentioned in any class. Some examples that come to mind:
en efectivo
mande
que le vaya bien
ándale pues

Meritorious-MasoMenos 16th January 2016 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TundraGreen (Post 9170162)
I took Spanish classes for six years and it amazes me a little how many common expressions I only picked up by listening to people. They were never mentioned in any class. Some examples that come to mind:
en efectivo
mande
que le vaya bien
ándale pues

And then once you start socializing with Spanish-speaking women, you pick up other phrases they don't teach in language school:

Que te vayas! [Que te vaaaaay-as!]
Largate de aqui! AHORITA!!

citlali 16th January 2016 02:28 PM

I picked up my Spanish from everyone around but it is good to have a teacher explained to you how and when to use them . If you are only going around midle class people you probably will speak Spanish like you should but I first learn Spanish when I got her from the workers remodelling the house then from indigenous who are not native speakers and from my cleaning lady and gardner so not the Spanish I really want to speak...I learned about the subtleties of the language from various teachers and I still am learning after 15 years.

GARYJ65 16th January 2016 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meritorious-MasoMenos (Post 9171682)
And then once you start socializing with Spanish-speaking women, you pick up other phrases they don't teach in language school:

Que te vayas! [Que te vaaaaay-as!]
Largate de aqui! AHORITA!!

Wow
I have never been told those, what did you do to them?

ojosazules11 17th January 2016 04:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TundraGreen (Post 9170162)
I took Spanish classes for six years and it amazes me a little how many common expressions I only picked up by listening to people. They were never mentioned in any class. Some examples that come to mind:
en efectivo
mande
que le vaya bien
ándale pues

The first 3 are used in other Spanish-speaking countries, but "ándale" is quintessentially Mexican.

Here are a few other phrases I've only heard used in Mexico, and which you probably won't learn in formal Spanish classes.

"A poco" = Seriously? Really?

I am more likely to use "De veras" which is common in Central America, or "En serio" or "De verdad" which are more common in the rest of the Spanish-speaking world (SSW).

"Sale" = OK, alright

In Central America, "Vaya pues" / "Va' pues" would be a commonly heard equivalent. "De acuerdo" or "Está bien" is more widely used throughout the SSW.

A couple of Mexican slang words which seem ubiquitous these days:

"Padre"/"Está padre" = Cool, That's cool. "Está padrísimo" = "That's way cool"

I've been hearing "padre" used in this way for over 20 years, so it's not just the under 40 crowd. However, the following one I don't recall hearing in the 1990's (or maybe I just wasn't around people who used it), but I hear it all the time now - from my daughter-in-law, my nieces, on Facebook, and just out and about:
"No manches" - hard to do a direct translation into English (and most of the alternatives that come to mind in Spanish are phrases I don't use and possibly violate one of the forum rules...) but it can mean "You gotta be kidding", "Seriously?", "No way!", etc. It can also mean something along the lines of "Don't bug me", "Enough already". Although "no manches" is apparently the "polite" version of a more vulgar phrase, I read somewhere that you would "never respond to your mother" with "no manches", but use the similar "a poco". I personally would feel strange using it, because it would feel like I'm trying to act a couple decades younger than I am.

Of course, there are tons more "Mexicanismos" that you'll probably not learn in Spanish class, but will hear when you're out and about.

TundraGreen 17th January 2016 04:38 AM

How about:
Simón (derivative of si = yes definitely)
Abuelita de batman (= of course)

It is always good for a laugh when I use the latter. It sounds very funny coming from a foreigner.

ojosazules11 17th January 2016 04:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TundraGreen (Post 9175698)
How about:
Simón (derivative of si = yes definitely)
Abuelita de batman (= of course)

It is always good for a laugh when I use the latter. It sounds very funny coming from a foreigner.

"Simón" is one I do use. Also "¡Nombre!" for "No way!" (No, hombre)

I've always been amused that in English "Mensa" is a high IQ society, but in colloquial Spanish "mensa" means "dummy" or idiot (female, for male it would be "menso").


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