Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 23

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Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 23


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  #221 (permalink)  
Old 29th June 2019, 02:23 PM
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Default Orear = to air out, take some air

I just added another new word to my Spanish vocabulary. I’m pretty sure I’ve heard it before but I never stopped the conversation to intentionally learn it. Today I did. After walking our dogs in wet grass this morning, my husband said to leave them on the porch “para que se oreen”. “żPara que se que?” I asked.

Orearse = to air out or dry out, take some air, get some fresh air, take a breather (e.g. if you’ve been cooped up in a stuffy meeting and you step outside to take a breather: “Voy a orearme un poco.”)

orear
Del lat. aura 'aire1'.
1. tr. Dicho del aire: Dar en algo, refrescándolo.
2. tr. Hacer que el aire dé en algo para que se seque o se le quite la humedad o el olor que ha contraído. Los campos se han oreado.
3. prnl. Dicho de una persona: Salir a tomar el aire.

I’m definitely a bit of a language nerd... I love learning new words.

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Last edited by ojosazules11; 29th June 2019 at 02:30 PM.
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  #222 (permalink)  
Old 6th July 2019, 05:16 PM
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Default Azuzar

It seems my husband continues to incorporate new words into our conversation. It’s better for my vocabulary-building than even reading the newspaper in Spanish. This week he used the word:

Azuzar: to incite, to egg on, to pressure, or in reference to dogs set or sic them on someone.

He used it in the context of a certain ex-president of Mexico inciting the national police in their protests of current reforms and restructuring.

In Latin American Spanish the “z’s” sound like “s”, but in Spain they sound as “th”. It feels funny on my tongue saying it that way.
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  #223 (permalink)  
Old 6th July 2019, 05:20 PM
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Default An exit is not an éxito

I’ve heard English speakers trying to find the way out by asking for the “éxito”. They don’t realize they are actually asking where the “success” or “achievement” is.

If you need the exit, ask for “la salida”.
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  #224 (permalink)  
Old 6th July 2019, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ojosazules11 View Post
It seems my husband continues to incorporate new words into our conversation. It’s better for my vocabulary-building than even reading the newspaper in Spanish. This week he used the word:

Azuzar: to incite, to egg on, to pressure, or in reference to dogs set or sic them on someone.

He used it in the context of a certain ex-president of Mexico inciting the national police in their protests of current reforms and restructuring.

In Latin American Spanish the “z’s” sound like “s”, but in Spain they sound as “th”. It feels funny on my tongue saying it that way.
It depends on where you are in Spain. Much of the New World's Spanish population came from Andalucía and, in many parts of Andalucía, you will get the 's' sound and not the 'th'

I started learning my Spanish in Colombia so I don't lithp and it occasionally puzzles the locals who tend to expect Brits to lithp. I do however drop the ends off words like the locals, for example "Bueno día" and my theory on that is from the Napoleonic Wars when the French were occupying and they tend to drop the ends off as in 'français' which is usually pronounced as if the 's' did not exist. Incidentally, in case anyone didn't know, the process of driving out the French was the origin of "guerrilla." The Andalucian resistance groups carried out skirmishes "little wars" i.e. "guerrillas" which, correctly speaking, refers to the minor battles, not the people who are guerrilleros.
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  #225 (permalink)  
Old 30th July 2019, 05:40 PM
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Default

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Originally Posted by baldilocks View Post
...
Incidentally, in case anyone didn't know, the process of driving out the French was the origin of "guerrilla." The Andalucian resistance groups carried out skirmishes "little wars" i.e. "guerrillas" which, correctly speaking, refers to the minor battles, not the people who are guerrilleros.
Interesting. It makes sense that “guerrilla” would mean little war, and in the Diccionario de la Real Academia Espańola the first definition is “escaramuza” (skirmish). In my experience in Latin America, “la guerrilla” is used to describe the entire group, whereas an individual fighter is a guerrillero. Although in Central America in the 80s, many people just referred to them as “los muchachos”...

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  #226 (permalink)  
Old 31st July 2019, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by ojosazules11 View Post
Interesting. It makes sense that “guerrilla” would mean little war, and in the Diccionario de la Real Academia Espańola the first definition is “escaramuza” (skirmish). In my experience in Latin America, “la guerrilla” is used to describe the entire group, whereas an individual fighter is a guerrillero. Although in Central America in the 80s, many people just referred to them as “los muchachos”...
As a correspondent in Central America in 1980s, who traveled with govt troops and guerrillas in combat zones in all regions, "los muchachos" was used only in El Salvador by supporters, including by peasants (who didn't understand Marxism), but certainly not by middle class in cities.

I see the president elected by the Salvadoran guerrilla group turned political party was granted citizenship by Nicaragua yesterday. As most Latam presidents, he left office a near billionaire despite his "I'm for the people" rhetoric. Current Salva govt wanted to extradite him for corruption and went to an international court. Marxist Nica govt made him citizen as their constitutional prohibits extradition of citizens. Though elected as former guerrilla leader, he only lined his own pockets.

US-supported contras in Nicaragua and Maoist guerrillas in Guatemala (who killed just as many peasants as army), were NEVER "los muchachos." That existed only in El Salvador, and again, only by supporters. Most Western media, and ALL European media, supported "los muchachos" and never reported their atrocities. When they swept into a village, they immediately executed any govt official or suspected sympathizers. Sometimes their families. I traveled with them, but also came into villages after a visit by "los muchachos."

Fun fact: Salvadoran photographer we employed turned out to be a guerrilla spy. After guerrillas basically gave up armed struggle, he became entrepreneur and millionaire. Nice guy, but always a bit stand-offish. Understandably.

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  #227 (permalink)  
Old 1st August 2019, 11:55 AM
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Maoist guerrillas in Guatemala (who killed just as many peasants as army), were NEVER "los muchachos."
1. According to the highly respected 1999 report written by the U.N.-backed Commission for Historical Clarification titled “Guatemala: Memory of Silence”, the vast majority, 93%, of human rights violations perpetrated during the internal armed conflict were carried out by state forces and military groups. Only 3% were attributable to the guerrilla insurgency groups. The other 3% could not be determined. So no, the guerrilla groups did NOT kill as many peasants as the army, with its full-scale massacres of entire villages and scorched-earth policies. That would have made no sense ideologically or practically, given that the rural villages and Mayan campesinos were their base of support (and for some of the groups made up the majority of their fighters). They also tried to win hearts and minds, not control through terror. As an aside, that same report found that 83% of those killed during the internal armed conflict were Mayan.

2. “Maoist guerrillas”??? Are you mixing up Peru with Guatemala? In Peru the Maoist Sendero Luminoso did commit many atrocities against peasants. In Guatemala the 4 major armed revolutionary groups which made up the URNG (FAR, ORPA, PGT, EGP) were all Marxist-Leninist, not Maoist.

3. I have a hunch you and I moved in very different circles when it comes to Guatemala in the 1980s. My first husband was Guatemalan, I worked extensively with Guatemalan refugees and many of my social circle were and continue to be Guatemalans. And yes, in at least some sectors of Guatemalan society “los muchachos” was used in reference to la guerrilla. Obviously it was used by supporters.

4. Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega and his sycophant wife long ago lost any credibility or veneer of actually caring about anything or anyone other than Daniel Ortega. You know what they say about power and absolute power...

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Last edited by ojosazules11; 1st August 2019 at 11:57 AM.
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  #228 (permalink)  
Old 4th August 2019, 11:29 PM
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Default “Relajo” vs. “Relax”

“Relajo” vs. “Relax”
Although some on-line Spanish-English dictionaries treat these 2 words as synonyms, in my experience and usage they are quite different. While technically relajo can mean “relax”, it is more often used to describe a big mess, disorder, unruliness, etc., kind of the opposite of relax

“Relax” in Spanish is similar to English, but it’s used as a noun, i.e. “el relax” as per the Diccionario de la Real Academia Espańola - I was surprised to find it there, as I thought it was just slang when used this way. The verb “to relax” is relajarse.

So right now, having recently returned from camping and unpacking everything, cleaning, etc. ahorita mi casa está hecho un relajo. So I can say, ”Del relax del camping al relajo de desempacar todo.”
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