Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 22

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Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 22


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  #211 (permalink)  
Old 13th May 2019, 05:05 AM
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That was very kind of your husband to arrange care for a homeless kitten. Currently I am caring for more than 20 feral cats and kittens that have found their way to my ground floor apartment.
This one didn't seem particularly feral. She just came right in and made herself at home! I have rescued some abandoned feral kittens in Toronto in the past. The mama cat had given birth to her litter in a parked truck at a mechanic shop, and the newborn kittens were moved by someone who didn't understand that this would result in the mother abandoning them. The animal shelter said they didn't take kittens that young. So I brought all 4 of them home. They were so tiny, their eyes were still closed. I had to feed them with a dropper, and rub their tiny bums to get them to go poo. My then-infant son was (finally) sleeping most of the night, and I was getting up every couple of hours to feed these little kittens!

If we weren't already chock-a-block full at our home here in Toronto, both humans and pets, I'd bring this new kitten back with us. I like the fact that she adopted my husband as her human. But the neighbours who have taken her are really nice, so I'm sure she'll be in good hands.
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  #212 (permalink)  
Old 13th May 2019, 10:00 AM
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This one didn't seem particularly feral. She just came right in and made herself at home! I have rescued some abandoned feral kittens in Toronto in the past. The mama cat had given birth to her litter in a parked truck at a mechanic shop, and the newborn kittens were moved by someone who didn't understand that this would result in the mother abandoning them. The animal shelter said they didn't take kittens that young. So I brought all 4 of them home. They were so tiny, their eyes were still closed. I had to feed them with a dropper, and rub their tiny bums to get them to go poo. My then-infant son was (finally) sleeping most of the night, and I was getting up every couple of hours to feed these little kittens!

If we weren't already chock-a-block full at our home here in Toronto, both humans and pets, I'd bring this new kitten back with us. I like the fact that she adopted my husband as her human. But the neighbours who have taken her are really nice, so I'm sure she'll be in good hands.
About 18 months ago there was this terrible screaming noise in the street which we traced to the rubbish bin. Inside we found a tied plastic bad and, within, were two puppies. One was already dead, the other was the one screaming. They were only hours old, both had their cords attached and they were still dripping. Needless to say, we rescued the live one but there was nothing to be done for the other one. Then began the period of feeding, first with a dropper, then on the bottle. We already have two rescued dogs and they are getting on a bit now, so there was no way we could keep a boisterous (and loud) puppy. Fortunately some new Brits moved into the village and they have adopted him.

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  #213 (permalink)  
Old 13th May 2019, 04:24 PM
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This one didn't seem particularly feral. She just came right in and made herself at home! I have rescued some abandoned feral kittens in Toronto in the past. The mama cat had given birth to her litter in a parked truck at a mechanic shop, and the newborn kittens were moved by someone who didn't understand that this would result in the mother abandoning them. The animal shelter said they didn't take kittens that young. So I brought all 4 of them home. They were so tiny, their eyes were still closed. I had to feed them with a dropper, and rub their tiny bums to get them to go poo. My then-infant son was (finally) sleeping most of the night, and I was getting up every couple of hours to feed these little kittens!

If we weren't already chock-a-block full at our home here in Toronto, both humans and pets, I'd bring this new kitten back with us. I like the fact that she adopted my husband as her human. But the neighbours who have taken her are really nice, so I'm sure she'll be in good hands.
I have gone through the feeding thing several times myself. I have lived in my neighborhood for more than 20 years. A few months after I moved here I found 2 tiny kittens behind my apt. and that started it. A couple of times neighbor kids have brought me kittens that they found. I'm not a "people person" and prefer the company of animals so it's no problem.
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  #214 (permalink)  
Old 13th May 2019, 08:37 PM
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About 18 months ago there was this terrible screaming noise in the street which we traced to the rubbish bin. Inside we found a tied plastic bad and, within, were two puppies. One was already dead, the other was the one screaming. They were only hours old, both had their cords attached and they were still dripping. Needless to say, we rescued the live one but there was nothing to be done for the other one. Then began the period of feeding, first with a dropper, then on the bottle. We already have two rescued dogs and they are getting on a bit now, so there was no way we could keep a boisterous (and loud) puppy. Fortunately some new Brits moved into the village and they have adopted him.
I really can't fathom how someone can do that to another living creature... So glad you could rescue one and find it a good home.
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  #215 (permalink)  
Old 13th May 2019, 08:47 PM
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I really can't fathom how someone can do that to another living creature... So glad you could rescue one and find it a good home.
We think, but can't prove it, that it was the b*st*rd who lives around the corner. He has a female who was pregnant and also has another female about the same age as the puppy we rescued (possibly of the same litter) and he docked that tail of that female himself (he openly boasts about it) and it is fairly certain that he used no anęsthetic but we can't prove anything otherwise we would put it into the hands of the animal cruelty branch (Seprona) of the Guardia Civil.

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  #216 (permalink)  
Old 1st June 2019, 12:27 PM
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Default “Me quiero resfriar”

I woke up this morning with a sore throat and the first signs of a cold. “Ay, me quiero resfriar,” I say to my husband (literal translation “I want to get a cold”). But of course I don’t want to get a cold. It’s just another way of saying I feel like I’m coming down with something or fighting off a cold.

When I first heard this phrase a few decades ago, I thought it strange that anyone would want to get sick. Of course, I soon figured out the colloquial usage. So this morning I can say, “Me quiero resfriar y no quiero resfriarme.” “I’m getting a cold, and I don’t want to have a cold!”

You can substitute “enfermar” (get sick) for “resfriar” (get a cold). Of course you can always use the way of saying the same thing that more closely matches the English way of saying it: “Siento que me voy a resfriar.” “I feel like I’m getting a cold.”
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  #217 (permalink)  
Old 27th June 2019, 12:30 PM
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Default Empalagarse

I had the good fortune of being immersed in Spanish when I was 21, and have been speaking it as part of my daily life at home and at work ever since. Not infrequently when speaking English I hit up against a word I know in Spanish that’s just perfect, but we just don’t have the equivalent in English (and vice versa).

Empalagarse is one of those words. Some dictionaries translate it as “get sick”, but that really does not explain this word. Empalagarse is a specific word for that sickly feeling you get when you eat too much sweets 🍭 or something overly sweet, that cloying sweetness that makes you wish you hadn’t indulged.

For instance, as a kid I loved cotton candy, but I don’t eat it anymore because “me empalaga”.
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  #218 (permalink)  
Old 27th June 2019, 12:59 PM
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I had the good fortune of being immersed in Spanish when I was 21, and have been speaking it as part of my daily life at home and at work ever since. Not infrequently when speaking English I hit up against a word I know in Spanish that’s just perfect, but we just don’t have the equivalent in English (and vice versa).

Empalagarse is one of those words. Some dictionaries translate it as “get sick”, but that really does not explain this word. Empalagarse is a specific word for that sickly feeling you get when you eat too much sweets �� or something overly sweet, that cloying sweetness that makes you wish you hadn’t indulged.

For instance, as a kid I loved cotton candy, but I don’t eat it anymore because “me empalaga”.
I know what you mean - take those really sweet kids that so many people (usually of the female persuasion) go really gooey eyed over, they make me feel quite sick!
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  #219 (permalink)  
Old 28th June 2019, 08:54 AM
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I woke up this morning with a sore throat and the first signs of a cold. “Ay, me quiero resfriar,” I say to my husband (literal translation “I want to get a cold”). But of course I don’t want to get a cold. It’s just another way of saying I feel like I’m coming down with something or fighting off a cold.

When I first heard this phrase a few decades ago, I thought it strange that anyone would want to get sick. Of course, I soon figured out the colloquial usage. So this morning I can say, “Me quiero resfriar y no quiero resfriarme.” “I’m getting a cold, and I don’t want to have a cold!”

You can substitute “enfermar” (get sick) for “resfriar” (get a cold). Of course you can always use the way of saying the same thing that more closely matches the English way of saying it: “Siento que me voy a resfriar.” “I feel like I’m getting a cold.”
I hear precisely this usage of “querer” in reference to rain, too.
Quiere llover” – it looks like rain (which now that I think of it, is an idiom, too – it means “it looks like it’s going to rain.”)
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  #220 (permalink)  
Old 29th June 2019, 03:14 AM
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I hear precisely this usage of “querer” in reference to rain, too.
Quiere llover” – it looks like rain (which now that I think of it, is an idiom, too – it means “it looks like it’s going to rain.”)
Definitely. I both hear and say this. In fact, I’m more likely to use “Quiere llover” than “Parece que va a llover” (It seems like it’s going to rain), probably just because it’s shorter.
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