Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 21

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Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 21


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  #201 (permalink)  
Old 27th April 2019, 09:53 PM
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Just reflecting on the word “dejar” (to let, stop, or leave). I never really thought about it until - in reference to calling someone who didn’t answer their phone - I said, “Lo dejé sonar hasta que dejó de sonar.” (I let it ring until it stopped ringing.) And to get in the 3rd meaning, in the fictional circumstance of, for instance, someone calling their romantic partner who isn’t picking up, they might say, “Lo dejé sonar hasta que dejó de sonar. Quizás me va a dejar.” (I let it ring until it stopped ringing. Maybe s/he is going to leave me.) No worries- that’s not my situation.
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  #202 (permalink)  
Old 27th April 2019, 10:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ojosazules11 View Post
I don’t recall personally seeing it used, but according to Wikipedia it would be PSI for “para su información”.

https://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/FYI

FYI (PSI): One 3 character abbreviation I do see (and use) often in “text speak” is TQM, for “Te quiero mucho”. Of course that’s in the context of family and friends (females for the most part).
I asked this question of 2 close friends (both doctoras) at breakfast this morning.

No - they said - here we are not in as much a hurry as you Americans :-)

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  #203 (permalink)  
Old 29th April 2019, 02:23 AM
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Originally Posted by ojosazules11 View Post
This is a phrase I recently learned from a friend from the Dominican Republic. No idea if it’s used in Mexico.
“El que apareja su burro sabe para donde va”

“Aparejar” means to put a saddle on, so the literal translation is “He who saddles up his burro knows where he’s headed.”

In terms of metaphors, it’s similar to “You made your bed, so lie in it.”
We don’t use it in Mexico

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  #204 (permalink)  
Old 29th April 2019, 02:29 AM
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So today I needed to forward a Spanish email to someone. Had it been in English I would have simply said FYI. Instead today I said Para su informacion.

Is there a Spanish/Mexican equivalent to FYI ?
We don’t use it in Mexico either

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  #205 (permalink)  
Old 29th April 2019, 03:05 AM
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Thanks for dropping by and helping us perfect our Mexican Spanish!
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  #206 (permalink)  
Old 12th May 2019, 01:31 PM
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This isn’t a saying, but I just learned a new Spanish word: “aquerenciarse”. It means becoming attached, and it’s used in particular for animals becoming attached to a place.

A couple of days ago my husband noticed a kitten (old enough to be fending for itself) in the lane adjacent to our house. It was hungry, so he gave it some leftovers. That night he slept with the bedroom door slightly open (it opens directly to our yard), and at 3 am he wakes to the sound of this kitten purring on the pillow next to his head! The kitten “se adueńó” (took ownership of the place), in spite of our 3 month old Schnauzer pup.

Unfortunately for the kitten, within a couple of weeks we’ll be closing up the place for the rainy season and heading back to Canada. So he explained to a neighbour that he didn’t want the cat to “aquerenciarse” - become attached to our place - because then it will suffer when no one is there. Fortunately the neighbours, whom we know treat their animals well, were happy to adopt this sweet kitten.
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  #207 (permalink)  
Old 12th May 2019, 04:50 PM
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That was very kind of your husband to arrange care for a homeless kitten. Currently I am caring for more than 20 feral cats and kittens that have found their way to my ground floor apartment.
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Old 12th May 2019, 10:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ojosazules11 View Post
This isn’t a saying, but I just learned a new Spanish word: “aquerenciarse”. It means becoming attached, and it’s used in particular for animals becoming attached to a place.

A couple of days ago my husband noticed a kitten (old enough to be fending for itself) in the lane adjacent to our house. It was hungry, so he gave it some leftovers. That night he slept with the bedroom door slightly open (it opens directly to our yard), and at 3 am he wakes to the sound of this kitten purring on the pillow next to his head! The kitten “se adueńó” (took ownership of the place), in spite of our 3 month old Schnauzer pup.

Unfortunately for the kitten, within a couple of weeks we’ll be closing up the place for the rainy season and heading back to Canada. So he explained to a neighbour that he didn’t want the cat to “aquerenciarse” - become attached to our place - because then it will suffer when no one is there. Fortunately the neighbours, whom we know treat their animals well, were happy to adopt this sweet kitten.
I have never heard that word

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  #209 (permalink)  
Old 13th May 2019, 02:38 AM
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Originally Posted by GARYJ65 View Post
I have never heard that word
Neither have I, but then I'm not a native Spanish-speaker. Maybe it's a word not used everywhere in Mexico. However, it does appear in at least one online dictionary: https://es.thefreedictionary.com/aqu.../aquerenciarse

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Last edited by Isla Verde; 13th May 2019 at 02:42 AM.
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  #210 (permalink)  
Old 13th May 2019, 05:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GARYJ65 View Post
I have never heard that word
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isla Verde View Post
Neither have I, but then I'm not a native Spanish-speaker. Maybe it's a word not used everywhere in Mexico. However, it does appear in at least one online dictionary: https://es.thefreedictionary.com/aqu.../aquerenciarse

I noted right away when my husband used it, that it was a new word for me. How he actually said it was "No quiero que se aquerencie", and I said "żNo quieres que que?"

He wasn't sure where he learned it, it's just the precise word that came to mind, and is very appropriate for his intended meaning of an animal becoming attached to a specific place. He reads a lot, so maybe he picked it up from a book he read.


From the website of the Real Academia Espańola:

aquerenciarse:
[Conjug. c. anunciar]

1. prnl. Dicho especialmente de un animal: Tomar querencia a un lugar.


querencia
1. f. Acción de amar o querer bien.

2. f. Inclinación o tendencia de las personas y de ciertos animales a volver al sitio en que se han criado o tienen costumbre de acudir.

3. f. Sitio hacia el que se tiene querencia.

4. f. Tendencia natural o de un ser animado hacia algo.

5. f. Taurom. Tendencia o inclinación del toro a preferir un determinado lugar de la plaza donde fijarse.

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Last edited by ojosazules11; 13th May 2019 at 05:55 AM.
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