Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 18

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Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 18


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  #171 (permalink)  
Old 12th September 2016, 06:42 AM
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Sunday's spelling/geography lesson:

Colombia is a country in northern South America.

Columbia is an Ivy League university in New York City.
Right, teach, thanks.

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  #172 (permalink)  
Old 12th September 2016, 07:13 AM
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Producers or networks or whateever they are, always make the same mistake when casting actors for accents or roles. As if they could not afford an accent expert to help them make a much better job. Series, movies end up being funny or disgusting by not having the right people doing the right job. Take the Godfather as an example; James Caan as a Sicilian?????? Come on!!! Andy García as Modigliani????
It's Colombians, by the way, not Columbians
As my original post said, I sorta agreed with your and the Colombians {See, teach?] but then I ran across an Esquire profile on the Brazilian lead that gave his and Netflix's perspective:

http://www.esquire.com/entertainment...pablo-escobar/

"I tried in the first season; I did the best I could," he [Wagner Moura] says in regards to what many thought was a failed attempt at interpreting Escobar's native tongue. "It's not that I didn't want to please Colombian people; I wanted them to feel that we respected them. But honestly the accent wasn't my main [concern]. It's a series where we have actors from Chile and Brazil and…honestly, it's a bunch of different Spanish accents. I was the main character. I'm Brazilian. I didn't speak Spanish before. And I expected to be the main target of criticism. But it isn't a series that is [just] made for Colombians. Though it tries to be respectful, it's Netflix, so it's seen around the whole world. And I love the fact that it's a bilingual show."

"The challenge of humanizing a monster like Pablo Escobar was something that we felt had hampered previous attempts to realize this story," Narcos executive producer Eric Newman says via email. "It took an actor of Wagner's caliber to pull it off. His commitment to getting inside the characters head, to showing sides of him that went deep, inspired and guided all of us in the making of Narcos. We never wanted to make an exploitation show about a drug dealer. Wagner's performance left little risk of that. I believe he is one of the best actors in the world, and I am honored to have helped introduce him to a global audience."

"I tried to know as much as I could about Pablo, but I did that in order to create my own version of him," Moura says. "I don't think that actors should imitate [their subjects]. Otherwise, go see a documentary. You have to create your own. It's Pablo, but it's also a mix of Pablo and myself and the way I see him. In the end, I was doing things that he was doing, as well, but there was no rational decision. I learned organically about the way he would walk or the way he would wear his pants. I didn't want to have anyone on the set telling me Pablo wouldn't do this."

For those who want to watch Pablo's story in excruciating detail in the sing-song Medellin dialect, the Columbian telenovela series is available on Netflix around the world: "Pablo Escobar: El Patrón de Mal." I've watched about 10 episodes.I don't know if English subtitles are available. Didn't check. I think there are 50 episodes or so. Accents might be right, but to me at least, the Columbian actors playing Pablo and his wife are far inferior to the Netflix version, but to each his own. It does go into much greater detail on the first wave of Columbian politicians and journalists who went after them, bringing in their families and all those warm values. Hard to watch as we all know what's going to happen to all of them, though I haven't reached it yet in Colombian version. Very, very brave people. Escobar killed three out of five presidential candidates in either 1988 or 89. Those folks were a lot braver than I ever could be. I'm idling wondering about connections between Mex pols and traffickers and wondering how many Mex pols have paid the ultimatum price to take them on.

Though I agree with the Brazilian lead actor. The drug was has long been lost, with drugs far more available now in the U.S. and at much, much cheaper prices in real dollars than before the war was launched, when, 1970s? For billions of U.S. tax dollars a year, and what has it brought U.S. taxpayers except tens of thousands of low level dealers doing decades behind bars. One of either Mexican or Colombian narco lingo phrases would apply.


Last edited by Meritorious-MasoMenos; 12th September 2016 at 07:25 AM.
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  #173 (permalink)  
Old 8th October 2016, 04:18 PM
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sAmusing take on how the hodge lodge of Spanish accents in Netflix's Narcos has upset and amused Columbians:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ombian-accents
The lead actor is of course a Brazilian who learned Spanish for the role and gained 40 pounds to do it.
Then, lead actress has a Mexican accent that grates on Columbian ears.
There was another article I saw earlier this week that explained a lot of the Spanish terms used by the narcos, but can't find it now. I did find this one, though:
https://colombianspanish.co/narcos-a-guide-to-the-slang

...
.
Should I find it disturbing that I already knew most of the "narco slang?
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  #174 (permalink)  
Old 8th October 2016, 04:24 PM
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Default Saluda o hemos dormido juntos

One of the Mexican and Latin American customs which I love (and miss when I'm not in a Latin environment) is that of greeting, "de saludar". Greeting your family members when you get up in the morning, greeting people you pass in the street, greeting your coworkers when you arrive at work, greeting each person individually with a handshake and/or kiss when you enter a social gathering, etc. So when I saw this video, I knew what it was about, but I didn't get the phrase at the end of the video: "Saluda el señor o hemos dormido juntos", roughly translated "Are you going to greet us or have we slept together?"

I had never heard this phrase before, so I started asking around and discovered it is widespread throughout Latin America, including South America, Central America, the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. My husband doesn't generally use the phrase, but he certainly was familiar with it.

The "have we slept together" has no sexual connotation. The way it's been explained to me by several friends is that if you've woken up in the same bed together, you likely have already greeted each other, or since you were never apart, you don't need to give a fresh greeting.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy the video. It's from Argentina, by the "Inter-religious Committee for Peace", to preserve and foment the wonderful custom of greeting each other.


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  #175 (permalink)  
Old 8th October 2016, 07:14 PM
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I was in Peru for a couple of weeks and noticed that people saluted each other much less than they do in Mexico ..no one tells you" buen provecho" in a restaurant either..
They also did not assume you were a "gringo" be cause you are light skin..I guess thay have many people from Argentina, Brazil and many other Latin American countries who are very European looking so they do not assume anything...
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  #176 (permalink)  
Old 8th October 2016, 07:37 PM
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I was in Peru for a couple of weeks and noticed that people saluted each other much less than they do in Mexico ..no one tells you" buen provecho" in a restaurant either..
Interesting observations, citlali. I wonder what a cultural anthropologist would have to say about these differences.

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  #177 (permalink)  
Old 8th October 2016, 07:41 PM
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We have been here four years now. We get and give a lot of personal greetings but I think it has only been in the last month or so when I have noticed people (complete strangers) walking into a room full of people and greeting the entire room - who then respond in kind. It reminds me of a 'fast-food-like' restaurant we went to during my working years. Whenever someone walked in the door the entire staff would yell "welcome to Moe's" !

Here's a question for you. As a guy - when I walk into the bank and our extremely helpful account rep gets up from her desk, extends her hand and then presents her cheek - am I supposed to kiss her cheek, merely rub my cheek against hers, touch cheeks and make a smouch like noise ? (for example)...

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  #178 (permalink)  
Old 9th October 2016, 12:19 AM
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We have been here four years now. We get and give a lot of personal greetings but I think it has only been in the last month or so when I have noticed people (complete strangers) walking into a room full of people and greeting the entire room - who then respond in kind. It reminds me of a 'fast-food-like' restaurant we went to during my working years. Whenever someone walked in the door the entire staff would yell "welcome to Moe's" !

Here's a question for you. As a guy - when I walk into the bank and our extremely helpful account rep gets up from her desk, extends her hand and then presents her cheek - am I supposed to kiss her cheek, merely rub my cheek against hers, touch cheeks and make a smouch like noise ? (for example)...
If she is presenting her cheek, then offer your cheek (touching cheeks lightly) and give an air kiss. If she just extends her hand without offering her cheek, then just keep to the handshake. It is a bit of a dance for each to see what the other offers: hand only; hand and cheek; hand, cheek and half-hug. Close friends and family may go in for the full hug.

In Guatemala I noted women would often clasp each other's wrists instead of palms in their "handshakes". I learned to kind of let the other person take the initiative in terms of which level of "saludo" to give.

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  #179 (permalink)  
Old 9th October 2016, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by citlali View Post
I was in Peru for a couple of weeks and noticed that people saluted each other much less than they do in Mexico ..no one tells you" buen provecho" in a restaurant either..
They also did not assume you were a "gringo" be cause you are light skin..I guess thay have many people from Argentina, Brazil and many other Latin American countries who are very European looking so they do not assume anything...
Apparently the "costumbre del saludo" is weakening in some countries, which is why the video was made, to remind people to strengthen this tradition. A few Latin Americans I talked to said they have noticed this as well, and they don't want this ingrained custom to be lost.

In terms of not standing out with lighter skin, I think that's more common in many South American countries. In Argentina, I never felt conspicuous due to my lighter skin and blue eyes. I remember one of the young men working at the supermarket had bright red hair, blue blue eyes, and a face full of freckles. But when he spoke, there was no doubt he was Argentine.

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  #180 (permalink)  
Old 10th October 2016, 01:01 AM
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One of the Mexican and Latin American customs which I love (and miss when I'm not in a Latin environment) is that of greeting, "de saludar". Greeting your family members when you get up in the morning, greeting people you pass in the street, greeting your coworkers when you arrive at work, greeting each person individually with a handshake and/or kiss when you enter a social gathering, etc.
I love this custom, too - as well as the tradition of taking leave (despidiéndose) of everybody when you leave a room or restaurant. My family & I do so out of habit (not the hugging or kissing) in the US; it's amazing "how sweet" people seem to think of the gesture in their response(s).

I get chuckles when I tell of how my church leader once was chastening me for kissing other women (latinas) in our church; and his surprise that I had done so in full view of my wife. I had to explain to him about the customs, and that yes, my wife kissed others & was kissed too.

¡Pobre gringuito!
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