Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 16

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Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 16


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  #151 (permalink)  
Old 16th April 2016, 02:23 AM
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Living in Toronto I have the advantage of being around Spanish-speaking people from various countries, so I'm doing my own research on different countries' use of this phrase, admittedly not particularly scientific. . . .

She also confirmed that "dia por medio" is commonly used in Argentina for "every other day".
I have never heard the phrase"día por medio" used in Mexico, so I was interested in finding out where it is used. WordReference.com is a useful online dictionary because it allows users to ask translation questions and receive answers from other users. I looked up "día por medio", and all of the answers came from native speakers from South America: Colombia, Argentina, Peru and Chile.
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  #152 (permalink)  
Old 16th April 2016, 01:38 PM
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Default Una manita de gato

Una manita de gato - literally "little hand of a cat" is a phrase frequently used around my house. When things get cluttered, as they are wont to do with teenagers coming and going, we'll say the house needs "una manita de gato", i.e. a bit of tidying up.

Of course there are also the days when la casa está para llorar (the house is in a "crying" state, i.e. really a mess) that rather than una manita de gato it needs un agarre de tigre (the firm grip or swipe of a tiger).

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  #153 (permalink)  
Old 16th April 2016, 02:45 PM
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Una manita de gato - literally "little hand of a cat" is a phrase frequently used around my house. When things get cluttered, as they are wont to do with teenagers coming and going, we'll say the house needs "una manita de gato", i.e. a bit of tidying up.

Of course there are also the days when la casa está para llorar (the house is in a "crying" state, i.e. really a mess) that rather than una manita de gato it needs un agarre de tigre (the firm grip or swipe of a tiger).
Perhaps it would be " Una garra de Tigre" a tiger's paw; much more than a cat's hand...
(I've never heard agarre de tigre)

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  #154 (permalink)  
Old 17th April 2016, 02:28 AM
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Perhaps it would be " Una garra de Tigre" a tiger's paw; much more than a cat's hand...
(I've never heard agarre de tigre)
I think the "agarre de tigre" is my stepson's invention - but I'll double check. Maybe I misheard him, then kept saying it wrong and no one corrected me!

(Like elotes & olotes in the phrase about "menos burros"- you're the one who corrected me on that one, Gary.)

On Word Reference there is mention by someone from Mexico of "un zarpazo de tigre" in contrast to "una manita de gato".

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  #155 (permalink)  
Old 19th April 2016, 12:04 AM
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Default Ongoing research on use of "8 dias" in different countries of Latin America

Just confirmed what I thought - in Colombia "8 dias" = 1 week, "15 dias" = 2 weeks.

This is common usage in Colombia, as in Mexico and Central America.

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  #156 (permalink)  
Old 19th April 2016, 12:11 AM
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Just confirmed what I thought - in Colombia "8 dias" = 1 week, "15 dias" = 2 weeks.

This is common usage in Colombia, as in Mexico and Central America.
Thanks for checking that out, ojos.

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  #157 (permalink)  
Old 2nd May 2016, 07:05 PM
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In the spirit of a current thread on the forum about hitchhiking, in Spanish there are various expressions for hitchhike.

In Central America, I learned "pedir ride" (ride pronounced like in English but rolling the "r" and the "d" so soft it's almost dropped - almost like saying "rye" with a rolled r), "pedir aventón" or "pedir jalón". The first two are used in Mexico as well - not sure about "pedir jalón"??

Apparently in Chile and Argentina the term is "hacer dedo" (kind of like "making the thumb" = "thumbing a ride"). And in Spain it is "hacer autoestop" or "hacer autostop". That is actually the translation in DRAE, but I hadn't heard of "autostop" in any language before. I suspect it's a European phrase.

Other than Tundra Green, it sounds unlikely many forum members will have opportunity to use this phrase, but you never know... Then again, a thumb stuck out at the side of the road is a fairly universal expression. No translation needed.
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  #158 (permalink)  
Old 23rd May 2016, 04:22 AM
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Default codo = elbow OR tightwad

In proper Spanish, codo means elbow, and tacaño means stingy, cheapskate or tightwad. But in Mexico and Central America if someone is codo, they are a tightwad. In Central America, a stingy person may even be described just with a gesture - tapping one's elbow with a knowing look indicates that so and so is a real tightwad. (I don't know if this gesture would also be used in Mexico. Anyone?)

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Old 23rd May 2016, 07:36 AM
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In proper Spanish, codo means elbow, and tacaño means stingy, cheapskate or tightwad. But in Mexico and Central America if someone is codo, they are a tightwad. In Central America, a stingy person may even be described just with a gesture - tapping one's elbow with a knowing look indicates that so and so is a real tightwad. (I don't know if this gesture would also be used in Mexico. Anyone?)
The gesture is definitely used in Mexico. It must mean something different in Mexico, though, because various Mexicans pals used it towards me. I think it means you're tall and handsome in Mexico, right?

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  #160 (permalink)  
Old 23rd May 2016, 02:57 PM
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The gesture is definitely used in Mexico. It must mean something different in Mexico, though, because various Mexicans pals used it towards me. I think it means you're tall and handsome in Mexico, right?
Of course, it does!

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