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-   -   Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries (https://www.expatforum.com/expats/la-chatarrer/960642-spanish-expressions-mexico-other-countries.html)

Cristobal 11th April 2016 11:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by citlali (Post 9901586)
Cristobal tous les 8 jours ou tous les 15 jours, same in French..It maybe why I picked up Spanish quickly, we think the same way..

We shared a table with a Dominicana and her Spanish husband at a wedding not long ago. My wife uesd the "ocho dias" expression in a conversation and the couple wasn't aware of its use as once a week which is the reason I had doubts about its use outside Mexico.

citlali 12th April 2016 02:12 AM

may be a left- over from Napoleon . Do you know if it used in Spain as well?

ojosazules11 12th April 2016 04:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cristobal (Post 9893282)
Here is an expression that could possibly be unique to Mexico, actually it is used in several variations.

Cada ocho (or 15) dias meaning once a week (or every 2 weeks). The logic of phrasing it this way generally escapes non-native speakers and even native speakers from some other countries.

You read my mind, Cristóbal. I had thought to post about this expression, too, since it can be confusing for English speakers. I'm surprised the Dominican/Spanish couple hadn't heard of its use, as I've certainly heard it used by people from several Latin American countries. In Spanish-English dictionaries "la quincena" is translated as 2 weeks or fortnight. If someone is paid every 2 weeks, they refer to being paid for "la quincena."

One of the variations is in reference to future time: "Hoy en ocho" is a week from now. "Hoy en quince" is 2 weeks from now - presumably because the "hoy" (today) is counted as one of the days.

But I have been wondering... What if I want to refer to 4 days from now? Do I say "Hoy en 5"? I can't recall ever hearing it used like that, only "Hoy en 8" or "Hoy en 15".

For 1 day in the future it is "mañana" (yes, I know the exact time frame for "mañana" can be open to interpretation), 2 days from now is "pasado mañana", but what about in 3,4,5 or 6 days? Other than "en 8/15", I generally just say the corresponding day of the week and avoid the counting the days thing altogether. And if it is Thursday of next week it will be "el otro jueves" (the other Thursday).

xolo 12th April 2016 02:52 PM

I too wish someone would research this expression. It really is quite logical "inside of 8 days" = "7 days" = 1 week. Is it really just a Mexican expression? I did a quick check of the RAE CREA corpus and most of the hits where from Spain, just a few from Mexico (surprisingly few hits, about 60 - 70 total). All examples were within the last 25 years or so but I know the expression has been around longer than that.

TundraGreen 12th April 2016 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9903210)
You read my mind, Cristóbal. I had thought to post about this expression, too, since it can be confusing for English speakers. I'm surprised the Dominican/Spanish couple hadn't heard of its use, as I've certainly heard it used by people from several Latin American countries. In Spanish-English dictionaries "la quincena" is translated as 2 weeks or fortnight. If someone is paid every 2 weeks, they refer to being paid for "la quincena."

One of the variations is in reference to future time: "Hoy en ocho" is a week from now. "Hoy en quince" is 2 weeks from now - presumably because the "hoy" (today) is counted as one of the days.

But I have been wondering... What if I want to refer to 4 days from now? Do I say "Hoy en 5"? I can't recall ever hearing it used like that, only "Hoy en 8" or "Hoy en 15".

For 1 day in the future it is "mañana" (yes, I know the exact time frame for "mañana" can be open to interpretation), 2 days from now is "pasado mañana", but what about in 3,4,5 or 6 days? Other than "en 8/15", I generally just say the corresponding day of the week and avoid the counting the days thing altogether. And if it is Thursday of next week it will be "el otro jueves" (the other Thursday).

I have always just assumed that Mexicans counted both the starting day and the ending day when referring to a week, thus from Tuesday to Tuesday is 8 days. I don't remember hearing people talk about two weeks but the same logic would give you 15 days for two weeks.

Another interesting difference from English is the periods of a year. "Quarterly" in English is "Trimestral" in Spanish. "Cuatrimestral" is, of course, four months. The Spanish counts the months, while the English looks at the fraction of a year.

Cristobal 12th April 2016 10:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TundraGreen (Post 9911250)
I have always just assumed that Mexicans counted both the starting day and the ending day when referring to a week, thus from Tuesday to Tuesday is 8 days. I don't remember hearing people talk about two weeks but the same logic would give you 15 days for two weeks.

Another interesting difference from English is the periods of a year. "Quarterly" in English is "Trimestral" in Spanish. "Cuatrimestral" is, of course, four months. The Spanish counts the months, while the English looks at the fraction of a year.

Trimester is also used in English to denote a 3 month period.

maesonna 12th April 2016 11:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meritorious-MasoMenos (Post 9893802)
"Unique to Mexico?" I hardly think so. In this instance, the expression of course extends outside the Hispanic community to the noted sage and philosopher Sir Ringo Starr, first bursting out to the greater world in 1964.

[…]

"Eight Days a Week" is a song by The Beatles written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon based on McCartney's original idea,

Paul McCartney has attributed the inspiration of the song to at least two different sources. In a 1984 interview with Playboy, he credited the title to Ringo Starr, who was noted for his malapropisms, which are credited as the source of other song titles (such as "A Hard Day's Night" and "Tomorrow Never Knows"):
LINDA: Ringo also said, 'Eight days a week.'
PAUL: Yeah, he said it as though he were an overworked chauffeur. (in heavy accent) 'Eight days a week.' (laughter) When we heard it, we said, 'Really? Bing! Got it!'[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight_Days_a_Week

I'm open to argument that the expression "ocho dias" is slightly older.

But the difference is that here ‘eight days’ is a sort of hyperbole, meaning “more than possible”; i.e. the week has seven days, so eight days a week is a Whole Lot. Like saying 110% about something that can only go up to 100%.

Whereas in Mexico, “ocho días” is just a standard way—the standard way—to say one week. Quince días is the normal way to say two weeks. I hear people say quince días much more than I hear them say dos semanas. And yet, oddly, I often notice people saying “veinte días” to mean “about three weeks”.

maesonna 12th April 2016 11:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9556418)
The prefix "re" in Spanish means the same as in English when it's used before a verb: "rehacer" = redo, "recalentar" = reheat, etc.

But before an adjective it means "very" (or the same as "muy" in Spanish).

If I like someone, "Me cae bien." If I like them a lot, "Me cae rebien." (Or "remal" for the opposite.)

If I'm mad, "Estoy enojada/o." Really mad, "Estoy reenojada/o"

Happy = feliz. Really happy = refeliz.
Difficult = difícil. Very difficult = redifícil.

To add even more emphasis, you can use "requete" instead of "re" - If I'm over the moon happy, "Estoy requetefeliz." Absolutely exhausted, "Estoy requetecansada/o".

Great explanation. The three gradations are “re–”, “rete–”, and “requete–”.

This also explains something that is a mystery to many Americans – why are refried beans called that? I’ve seen plenty of strained explanations that involve frying beans twice, or frying them after they’ve already been cooked.

But knowing the above, we can understand that frijoles refritos aren’t fried twice, they’re very fried — well-fried, as we would say it.

citlali 12th April 2016 11:44 PM

If they say the same thing in Spain it probably comes from the Latin. Anyone knows what the Italians or Potuguese say?

maesonna 13th April 2016 04:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ojosazules11 (Post 9903210)
But I have been wondering... What if I want to refer to 4 days from now? Do I say "Hoy en 5"? I can't recall ever hearing it used like that, only "Hoy en 8" or "Hoy en 15".

I think that both in English or Spanish, we‘d be more likely to say “next Sunday” because who among us can instantly identify which day is 4 days from now or 5 days from now without counting on our fingers or on a calendar. But as to your question, it’s a good one to which I don’t know the answer either.

Except that cada tercer día does mean ‘every other day’, not one day out of three. I find it highly confusing, so it’s comforting to know that you can also say ‘every other day’ as un día sí, un día no.


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