Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 12

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Spanish expressions - Mexico and other countries - Page 12


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  #111 (permalink)  
Old 6th March 2016, 11:46 PM
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I like the Joanna rants. This is probably the closest to being on topic.

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  #112 (permalink)  
Old 7th March 2016, 01:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattoleriver View Post
I like the Joanna rants. This is probably the closest to being on topic. Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0-rC2id8xI
That one is funny!

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  #113 (permalink)  
Old 9th April 2016, 11:07 PM
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Default "Al pie de la letra"

The phrase “al pie de la letra” is one I use fairly often, but the other day as I was saying it, I realized how funny it sounds if translated literally to English: “At the foot of the letter”.

As a clue to its actual meaning, it is a phrase I often use when giving my Spanish-speaking patients medical instructions, e.g. for taking medications. “Hay que seguir las instrucciones al pie de la letra.”

So you probably guessed, it means “exactly” or idiomatically “to a T” (which is also kind of a funny way of saying it, I guess).

I wonder what the origin of this phrase is? It's not regional, at least it is used throughout Latin America. Those of you who have lived in Spain can chime in if it is also used there.


Last edited by ojosazules11; 9th April 2016 at 11:09 PM.
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  #114 (permalink)  
Old 11th April 2016, 02:09 AM
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In French we say au pied de la lettre which is exactly the same expression , probably something that comes fom Latin or French or who knows.. but it is something the French and the Spaniards obviously were saying long time ago..

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  #115 (permalink)  
Old 11th April 2016, 02:26 AM
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I checked out the French and it said that as far back as the 16th century it meant " a strict " interpretation" of word or expression.
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  #116 (permalink)  
Old 11th April 2016, 04:39 AM
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Here is an expression that could possibly be unique to Mexico, actually it is used in several variations.

Cada ocho (or 15) dias meaning once a week (or every 2 weeks). The logic of phrasing it this way generally escapes non-native speakers and even native speakers from some other countries.

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  #117 (permalink)  
Old 11th April 2016, 06:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cristobal View Post
Here is an expression that could possibly be unique to Mexico, actually it is used in several variations.

Cada ocho (or 15) dias meaning once a week (or every 2 weeks). The logic of phrasing it this way generally escapes non-native speakers and even native speakers from some other countries.
"Unique to Mexico?" I hardly think so. In this instance, the expression of course extends outside the Hispanic community to the noted sage and philosopher Sir Ringo Starr, first bursting out to the greater world in 1964.

"Eight Days a Week"
Song by the Beatles from the album Beatles for Sale
Published Northern Songs Ltd.
Released 4 December 1964
Recorded 6 October 1964
EMI Studios, London
Genre Rock[1]
Length 2:44
Writer Lennon–McCartney
Producer George Martin

"Eight Days a Week" is a song by The Beatles written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon based on McCartney's original idea,[3]
Contents [hide]

Paul McCartney has attributed the inspiration of the song to at least two different sources. In a 1984 interview with Playboy, he credited the title to Ringo Starr, who was noted for his malapropisms, which are credited as the source of other song titles (such as "A Hard Day's Night" and "Tomorrow Never Knows"):
LINDA: Ringo also said, 'Eight days a week.'
PAUL: Yeah, he said it as though he were an overworked chauffeur. (in heavy accent) 'Eight days a week.' (laughter) When we heard it, we said, 'Really? Bing! Got it!'[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight_Days_a_Week

I'm open to argument that the expression "ocho dias" is slightly older.

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  #118 (permalink)  
Old 11th April 2016, 02:56 PM
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al pie de la letra:

RAE (letra)
5. f. Sentido propio y exacto de las palabras empleadas en un texto, por oposición al sentido figurado.

RAE (pie)
3. Base o parte en que se apoya algo.

Wikilingua cites a source that says the expression goes back to when Latin was scribed into Spanish and the instructions were to do a literal translation below each word. (BTW, that sounds like a horrible translation method). If that is true, I would think somewhere around 800-1100 AD would be when it started.
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"Do not cry for my passing, each tear that you spill will flood my path and impede my crossing

Remember, my heart still loves you and if I hear you cry I shall turn back"

Crónicas de Mictlán (my translation)

Last edited by xolo; 11th April 2016 at 02:59 PM.
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  #119 (permalink)  
Old 11th April 2016, 09:04 PM
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Cristobal tous les 8 jours ou tous les 15 jours, same in French..It maybe why I picked up Spanish quickly, we think the same way..

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  #120 (permalink)  
Old 11th April 2016, 09:06 PM
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In French we say it comes from the Bible..following some scripture literally..so who knows..

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