Ghost stories from Thailand

Go Back   Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad > Asia > Thailand Expat Forum for Expats Living in Thailand > The Basement Lounge

The Basement Lounge This new forum is for socialising, networking and off topic discussions for all members either living in or moving to the Thailand.

Like Tree2Likes

Ghost stories from Thailand


Reply
 
Subscribe to this Thread Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11th June 2011, 02:58 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: thailand
Posts: 23
Rep Power: 0
thai wise is on a distinguished road
2 likes received

Users Flag! Originally from australia. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Smile Ghost stories from Thailand

Talk to any thai and they all have storys about a ghost… or an area where a ghost lives. …where we live there is a section of road where over 100 people have died in the last 100 years about… 3km long…stretch of… straight rd…. rice farms either side… we went to 4 funerals in 4 weeks and all the people died in this area now I do not believe in ghosts ////one guy was falling a big fat tree with a gang of professional tree cutters to cut it all up for timber to build houses he made the first cut very close to the ground as they do to keep all the long lengths and got his chainsaw stuck… he had time to get out of the way but chose to try to get the chain saw out of the cut… the wind spun the tree and it landed on him killing him instantly ////one school girl fell off a motorcycle and damaged her heart transplant and died /////2 drunk guys fell off motorcycles one was decapitated and was over the side of the bank for a week or two local dogs took his head and it was never found /// and one guy fell off his motorcycle and went down the bank and had a heart attack trying to get back up the bank the mosquitoes would have been giving him hell I helped put him in the box and he had scratches all over him from the bushes trying to get back up to the road no one in the village will go along the stretch of road after dark unless they have to //////ask your wife if she knows any ghost storys and share them………
BlueGirl likes this.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 11th June 2011, 11:56 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: thailand
Posts: 23
Rep Power: 0
thai wise is on a distinguished road
2 likes received

Users Flag! Originally from australia. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default

The story of Mae Nak Phra Khanong (Thai: แม่นาคพระโขนง) (or simply Mae Nak: แม่นาค) is a well known and popular Thai ghost story. Local folklore claims that this story is based on actual events that took place during the 19th century Mae Nak Phra Khanong, a 1958 Thai film
Nang Nak, a 1999 film by Thai director Nonzee Nimibutr
Ghost of Mae Nak, a 2005 Thai film by British director Mark Duffield
Nak, a Thai animated feature film, released on April 3, 2008.[2][3]
Mae Naak, an opera composed by Somtow Sucharitkul. It was premiered in 2003 and revived in 2005 by the Bangkok Opera, with soprano Nancy Yuen performing the title role in both productions.
Maenak Prakanong the Musical, a 2009 musical directed by Takonkiet Viravan and starring Myria Benedetti and Anatpol Sirichumsang

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12th June 2011, 12:25 AM
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: thailand
Posts: 23
Rep Power: 0
thai wise is on a distinguished road
2 likes received

Users Flag! Originally from australia. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default

In general, Thai people tend to be very superstitious and even though today isn't Friday the 13th it’s as good a time as any to explore a few of these superstitions and beliefs. Some of the superstitions are old wives’ tales similar to those in many other countries while others have their roots in animist beliefs. A lot of the superstitions and beliefs are related to spirits or ghosts.

Thai Nicknames
One of the most obvious examples that visitors to Thailand will come across is the use of Thai nicknames. When a Thai child is born, he or she will be given an official name. This is normally Sanskrit in origin, will consist of two or more syllables and will invariably mean something positive such as long life or happiness. This name will then be used on all legal and official documents. However, the majority of Thais will also be given a nickname. The reason behind this is to confuse the bad spirits and stop them from being attracted to the baby. The nicknames are often short one syllable names such as Lek (small), Fon (rain), Fah (sky). The names aren’t always flattering such as Gob (frog), Gai (chicken) or Ouan (fat). These nicknames given at birth are then carried through the rest of that person’s life. So, Lek (small) can turn out to be big and Ouan (fat) can end up as a pencil-slim catwalk model. It’s also believed that spirits are attracted to the beautiful and some Thai people, particularly the older generation, may ‘compliment’ a new-born baby by referring to it as nakliat (ugly) or ouan (fat).

Superstitions for Thai Drivers
In major towns and cities it’s easy to spot the vendors selling jasmine garlands on traffic intersections. They usually walk up and down the lines of traffic trying to sell their 20 Baht garlands. Drivers hang these from their mirror as an offering to the spirit guardian who is believed to protect the vehicle and its inhabitants. The garlands can be seen in many taxi cabs and ordinary buses. It is also common for drivers to wai or honk the car horn as they go past certain shrines as they are driving along. This can be disconcerting if you are the passenger in a cab or bus when the driver suddenly takes both hands off the wheel to offer a wai to the shrine he is whizzing past!

Buying a new car in Thailand can be a complicated affair for those Thais who are superstitious. Attention must be given to ensure the date of purchase is auspicious, the colour is lucky and the number plate should also contain some auspicious numbers (3 and 9 are good). Once purchased, a monk may preside over a ceremony to bless the car.

More Thai Beliefs
It’s bad luck to get your hair cut on a Wednesday. Some barber shops actually close on Wednesdays for this reason.

Don’t smell the flowers you are offering to a monk or for Buddha. If you do, something bad will happen to your nose.

Don’t stomp your feet in the house because it will scare the house spirits away and the house will be left without protection.

Don’t eat while lying down because you will come back as a snake in the next life

It is worth remembering that you should not make merit in your house or have a haircut on Wednesdays, and Fridays are considered inappropriate days for funerals.

Ghosts play a role in most cultures, with certain ghost stories being retold for hundreds of years. Although practically everyone has their favourite ghost story which they love to tell, most Westerners no longer have a strong belief in ghosts and stories are told in a very tongue-in-cheek manner.

However, many Thai people still have a strong belief and fear of ghosts. Many of my Thai friends claim to have seen at least one ghost and can recall a large number of ghost stories in vivid detail.

Here are a few of the beliefs concerning ghosts:

If you make jokes when eating a ghost will steal your rice

A ghost will enter your house if you stand in the doorway

A ghost will curse you if you sing while eating

You will see a ghost if you bend down and look between your legs

Never say a baby is cute because a ghost will come and take it away.

As I have said, there are literally thousands of beliefs and superstitions in Thailand. Here are some additional ones I find particularly interesting:

Do not look at naked people because your eyes will become swollen

Do not throw money away because you will lose your finger

The moon contains a rabbit

Bite your shoes before you wear them for the first time to prevent them from biting your feet

Your finger will fall off if you point at a rainbow

Do not taste food with a large serving spoon because it will make your child ugly "

Bad luck will come to a house if you enter through the window

Another thing most visitors to Thailand notice is that many people wear amulets. Amulets are special Buddha images, often gold-plated and worn around the neck. They are believed to possess a variety of sacred powers such as the ability to protect the wearer from accident or ill-health.

Stalls selling amulets can be seen on virtually every street or market place. However, authentic Jatukam amulets should only be bought from particular temples and the monks who reside there. The amulets are blessed by monks or priests and often three or even five are worn together on a piece of cord. Never wear an even number of amulets as it is considered unlucky.

You should avoid touching a Thai person's amulet as it diminishes the amulet's powers. Also, avoid wearing the amulet in the toilet as it will no longer be sacred.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12th June 2011, 12:34 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Here
Posts: 1,693
Rep Power: 9961
Song_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond repute
242 likes received
269 likes given

Users Flag! Originally from newzealand. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thai wise View Post
Buying a new car in Thailand can be a complicated affair for those Thais who are superstitious. Attention must be given to ensure the date of purchase is auspicious, the colour is lucky and the number plate should also contain some auspicious numbers (3 and 9 are good). Once purchased, a monk may preside over a ceremony to bless the car.
The 'auspicious day' for car buying was in the news in January year. The car dealers must really look forward to these days!
On a single day yesterday, considered a Maha Thongchai or auspicious day to open a new shop or drive home a new car, people in the province bought as many as 400 cars worth more than 300 million baht in total.
Car showrooms in downtown Surat Thani were abuzz yesterday, packed with families waiting to drive off in their new cars. Some showrooms were so crowded that staff had to distribute queue tickets so that each buyer could test-drive a new car at the particular time they wanted, usually a time determined as being auspicious by monks or astrologers.
In a single day yesterday, Toyota Surat Thani sold 150 new vehicles, Prajak Isuzu 130, Honda Surat Automobile 50 and Nissan Surat Thani about 30. Other brands were also selling well.
On the same day, car showrooms in Songkhla posted sales of more than 500 vehicles.
When one of our friends was ready to open her new business/shop she als waited for the 'right day' and had the place blessed by local monks; same applies for weddings as for my partner's sister and husband-to-be it was determined that a Tuesday in January was 'the day' for them to be married and have a happy marriage for life.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 223401.jpg (78.9 KB, 271 views)


Last edited by Song_Si; 12th June 2011 at 12:38 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12th June 2011, 12:43 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Here
Posts: 1,693
Rep Power: 9961
Song_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond repute
242 likes received
269 likes given

Users Flag! Originally from newzealand. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default

The moon contains a rabbit

We now live in Chanthaburi - and the province symbol is the rabbit on the moon


The rabbit on the moon, and official seal of Chanthaburi province

I understand the rabbit on the moon story is Asian rather than Thai; here is one version (Japan)

The Rabbit in the Moon



Once the Old-Man-of-the-Moon looked down into a big forest on the earth. He saw a rabbit and a monkey and a fox all living there together in the forest as very good friends.

"Now, I wonder which of them is the kindest," he said to himself. "I think I'll go down and see."

So the old man changed himself into a beggar and came down from the moon to the forest where the three animals were.

Please help me," he said to them. "I'm very hungry."

"Oh! What a poor old beggar!" they said, and then they went hurrying off to find some food for the beggar.

The monkey brought a lot of fruit. And the fox caught a big fish. But the rabbit couldn't find anything at all to bring.

"Oh my! oh my! what shall I do?" the rabbit cried. But just then he got an idea.

"Please, Mr. Monkey," the rabbit said, "you gather some firewood for me. And you, Mr. Fox, please make a big fire with the wood."

They did as the rabbit asked, and when the fire was burning very brightly, the rabbit said to the beggar: "I don't have anything to give you. So I'll put myself in this fire, and then when I'm cooked you can eat me."

The rabbit was about to jump into the fire and cook himself. But just then the beggar suddenly changed himself back into the Old-Man-of-the-Moon.

"You are very kind, Mr. Rabbit," the Old Man said. "But you should never do anything to harm yourself. Since you are the kindest, of all, I'll take you home to live with me."

Then the Old-Man-of-the-Moon took the rabbit in his arms and carried him up to the moon. Just look and see! If you look carefully at the moon when it is shining brightly, you can still see the rabbit thee where the Old Man put him so very long ago.


Last edited by Song_Si; 12th June 2011 at 12:51 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 12th June 2011, 01:31 AM
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: thailand
Posts: 23
Rep Power: 0
thai wise is on a distinguished road
2 likes received

Users Flag! Originally from australia. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default

I remember one time we went on a doubldeker bus. I noticed the front seats were empty on the top level they had a fantastic view of the road ahead. I was told. I could go and sit there but my wife could not as her feet were above the drivers head .ok I thought no problem they did not look that safe anyway

A lot of the time Thai people will not want to go somewhere because they say they have seen a ghost there. when they say that I start asking questions like what color clothes was he wearing and did he have a hat was he wareing shoes how tall was he was he thin they dig them self in so deep. I have never met a Thai that has seen a ghost but there are a lot of Thaïs that I have not met

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 12th June 2011, 01:59 AM
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: thailand
Posts: 23
Rep Power: 0
thai wise is on a distinguished road
2 likes received

Users Flag! Originally from australia. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default

Thailand is riddled with ghosts and spirits, or "phii" (rising tone), some are good, some are bad. Some of these ghosts are the souls of death people which have not yet passed to the afterlife, but often 'phii' will refer to what we in the West may call spirits. These spirits are more unique entities, rather than the 'remains' of people, and are usually associated with something, a tree, a rock, an animal, etc.
For example, "phii khluay taa nii" is a spirit of a beautiful woman in a Thai dress that lives inside a banana tree and who comes out at night. Men seeing her will run over to hug her, but she runs back into the tree and the guy ends up hugging the tree.
Also, when nature calls and there is no alternative to using the countryside, try avoiding the old, big trees. Apologize to the spirit and explain that 'you are sorry, but that there is no alternative'.

Not all the spirits are so benevolent though; "phii pop" are evil spirits who live among the people. During the day, they seem like a normal person, but at night they go in search of food (they are said to love chicken). While out searching their body stays in bed, but they take their head with them. They tend to avoid people, but may use clothes that are outside to wipe the blood of their mouth. If a person would boil this cloth, the spirit will come running over because it hurts their stomach. They will then do anything you want to make you stop boiling the cloth.

Another ghost is referred to as the "widow ghost". She supposedly searches for a husband and sometimes takes men while they are sleeping. When men die in there sleep it is sometimes attributed to this widow ghost taking them.
To fool the ghost, men who have been scared by a suspicious death, may resort to disguising themselves as women.

In the old days almost everything in the daily life of Thai people was dominated by these spirit believes, even the architecture and direction of houses. For example, banyan trees were never planted next to houses, as they are said to be easily possessed by spirits. Broken Buddha figurines are said to be unlucky, and are disposed under a banyan tree in a temple. Look at many banyan trees, they are all around Thailand dressed in some cloth, incense is placed under them. All of that is done to placate the spirit housed in the tree.
This is just one of the many rules for a wide variety of different plants.

Nowadays, though, these kinds of spirits, both good and evil, are not really common anymore, certainly not in the cities.
Ghosts of dead people are more still very common though. It takes 3 days before a person knows he or she is dead. The ghost will then return home to collect the clothes and other personal belongings he/she needs for the afterlife. They will also talk to the living, but the living can neither see nor hear them. Dogs, on the other hand, are said to be able to see them and it is said that when a dog howls he is seeing ghosts.
These ghosts are almost always benign.

A very famous example of a ghost returning to the living is the story of Ngarn Ngak. Ngarn Ngak is the ghost of a woman who died while her husband was away fighting a war. Upon his return she continues taking care of him, her husband does not know. Other people however do, and they try to tell him, but she scares away all of them. (For a more detailed story check: Thai Folk dot Com -->The knowledge of Thai life-style.)
Her body is said to be laid to rest at Wat Mahabut, in Prakanong, Bangkok, and it attracts a lot of visitors every day.

Spirithouses

Whenever a house is build, the spirits of the land are disturbed, so a spirithouse (san phra prom) is build for them, in an attempt to pacify the spirits so they will not haunt the house. Spirithouses are shrines in the shapes of houses, and may contain figurines.
Regular offers of incense, fruit, water, garlands, etc. are made to the spirits to please them and guarantee the safety of the house.
These spirithouses are very common, and just about every house/office has one.

A very famous spirithouse is the one next to the Grand Hyatt Erewan. During the building of the hotel, there were a lot of accidents and other setbacks, so a monk was called in. He said that a spirithouse was required to please the spirits in the area. After it was build, the accidents stopped and work continued on schedule. The spirithouse, called the Erewan Shrine, has since become very busy, attracting worshippers from all over the city.

Spirithouses aren't the only form of evidence of superstition though, many of the Thai-style buildings have two "gah-lae" sticking out of the roof (the wing-like decorations). These "gah-lae" are meant to ward off evil spirits.
Little mirrors, usually decorated with various symbols, serve the same purpose, but I think this is more a Chinese custom than a Thai one.

Possession

Closely linked to ghosts is also the topic of possession. In some areas in Thailand, families have their own family guardian spirits. They are usually consulted through family mediums who are advising people in trance. One kind of family spirit is always kept secret though, it is the "phii kin kon" ('ghost who eats people). A family who has this protective spirit has to observe some very special rules, and people marrying into a family having this spirit as a guardian are said not to have a very long life.

And when haunted houses need exorcising, specially trained people are called in, who with the aid of a tool called "mai song" can pin point the graves of people. During those ceremonies some protective deities are moving into the "mai song", and possess the arms of the handlers (there are always two). The exorcism is an enormously energetic activity, where the spirits are exorcised with a lot of noise and running around.



Ceremonies
Many of the ceremonies performed in Thailand have some underlying animistic beliefs. The tying of white, or colored, strings around the wrists of visitors for instance. By tying these strings the giver wishes the receiver happiness and good fortune. A string-tying ceremony is part of most (all?) Thai traditional weddings.

Another ceremony is the "gae bon". When an oath is made, that when some wish comes true, the ancestors have to be presented with a pig's head and some sweets in a short ceremony early in the morning. In the old days often a Buddha, usually called "buccha" Buddhas, was carved and placed in a temple or cave as well.

Spells
Another very common form of superstition are spells and charms. Look around you and you will see many of them, usually in the form of Buddha amulets or special tattoos.

Amulets

Most of the Buddha amulets are worn (or glued to dashboards) as a good-luck charm, not that much different from a Catholic wearing a cross. However, there are special ones, usually with the image of a certain revered monk, which supposedly protect the wearer from specific dangers.

The amulets are manufactured by mixing a lot of different plants and herbs together; the most powerful ones are when the ashes of a dead famous monk are mixed into them. Fairly common is also the use of a little bone fragment of a dead parent as an amulet.
"Palad kick" (amulets shaped like a penis) are very well known, and highly collectible amulets. They are usually worn by men around the waist, and are used to attract women. They are made of wood, buffalo horn, clay or ivory.
For more information check out: Penis Amulets.

Similar to these "palad kick" are the very distinct black magic/love charms, the so called "ai ngan i boe". They are extremely explicit sexual amulets showing couples in almost any imaginable sexual position, and are used to attract the opposite sex. A women trying to break up relationship will for example place such a figure, which she obtained from a 'moh pii' in the bed of a couple she wants to break up. A prostitute might place a figurine in her bra to attract customers. Men might wear them around their waste to attract some women.
The most powerful ones are said to be from Surin/Cambodia. While they were very common in the old days, they are not used much anymore.

Finally, another very powerful, very rare amulet against ghosts is a Chinese "paa yan" given out at some of the very gruesome Chinese graveyard festivals. While wearing them a few rules have to be observed: no alcohol, no meat from cows, turtles, frogs, elephants as well as some other animals.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 12th June 2011, 02:22 AM
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: thailand
Posts: 23
Rep Power: 0
thai wise is on a distinguished road
2 likes received

Users Flag! Originally from australia. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default

I personally and many Thaïs. I know believe in dogs being able to see people who have died .and that they come back to visit after death dogs can actually see them I remember when my mother died in hospital I was at home standing in the secluded back yard and I could see our dog waging its tail as if someone was there then the phone rang and I was told my mother had passed away I will never forget that /// at night the local dog packs usually fight but sometimes they howl . Thai people believe they sence someone has died in the area I have actually noticed people being taken home from the hospital after death in the back of the pick up and you can hear dogs howling in the area as they pass by ….. i just realized i do belive in ghosts..............

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 5th July 2011, 04:50 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Here
Posts: 1,693
Rep Power: 9961
Song_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond repute
242 likes received
269 likes given

Users Flag! Originally from newzealand. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default

Explore the Ghosts and Spirits of Thailand

Whether you believe in Ghosts or are a skeptic, there is no denying that the paranormal has a profound effect on the Thai society and their everyday lives.

It is so ingrained in their culture that what may appear to be strange or bizarre for people from a Western culture is just accepted as normal for the majority of Thai society.

The strong belief in Ghosts and Spirits affect every aspect of Thai life, from their religious beliefs, TV programs/ films and can even influence business - most businesses will have a Spirit house installed and provide offerings of food and gifts to placate the Ghosts and Spirits that may dwell in their property and attract good luck.

Here is a fun advert from a Thai company which uses Ghosts to good effect in selling their product and also gives a brief insight into the many types of Ghosts and Spirits that are said to inhabit Thailand:


Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 5th July 2011, 05:03 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Here
Posts: 1,693
Rep Power: 9961
Song_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond reputeSong_Si has a reputation beyond repute
242 likes received
269 likes given

Users Flag! Originally from newzealand. Users Flag! Expat in thailand.
Default Nang Nak

Quote:
Originally Posted by thai wise View Post
The story of Mae Nak Phra Khanong (Thai: แม่นาคพระโขนง) (or simply Mae Nak: แม่นาค) is a well known and popular Thai ghost story.....
Ask any Thai person about Nang Nak and they will recount the tragic ghost story of Mae Nak Phra Khanong. The story is widespread among the population and is often recited to children to ensure that they do as they are told otherwise Nang Nak will get them and eat their brains with chilli sauce! The story is used much like the bogey man in Western culture.

here's one version





The Story of Nang Nak


Centuries ago in a rural village in Thailand Nang Nak lived happily with her husband, Mak. Everything seemed to be going well for the couple as Nang had just fallen pregnant and they were both looking forward to the birth of their first child. However, their cirumstances changed when Mak was called away to fight in a war leaving Nang to tend for herself alone.

Many months passed before Mak eventually returned home after being injured and barely surviving the war. As he travelled closer to his home he noticed that many of his fellow villagers did not speak to him or acknowledge him. This was soon forgotten when he reached his home and was greeted by his beautiful wife, Nang and their new baby. Life soon returned to normallity for Mak and Nang dutifully undertook the tasks of caring for her husband, their baby and cleaning their wooden Thai style stilt house.

Mak soon felt that something was not quite right, and strange things were occuring in the village. It was not until a friend of Mak visited him that things took a more sinister twist. His friend, along with the other villagers, knew that Nang had died along with her child in childbirth yet Mak was living with the ghost of his departed wife seemingly unaware of what had happened. The ghost of Nang, unable to accept her early death and thought of losing her much loved husband, was projecting an alternate world, disguising the real events from Mak.

After returning home Mak's friend decided to go the next day to tell Mak that he is living with a ghost, however, the ghost of Nang would not allow this and killed him before he could tell the truth. The ghost of Nang became increasing protective over her husband, and killed anyone that appeared a threat to her or who would tell her husband what really happened to his wife.

It was not until Mak witnessed a strange occurrance that he began to realise that the world he thought he was living in was actually a charade implemented by his wife. Whilst upstairs preparing a meal for them, Mak witnessed a lemon fall through a gap in the floorboards and his wife's arm distend and stretch down to the floor below to pick up the fruit. Shocked by what he witnessed he began to see cracks appear in his world and that his house was not a nicely kept home but was now a derelict shack. Fearing for his life he fled to the local temple.

Mak along with the terrified villagers decided to rid the village of the ghost of Nang and burned down the now delapidated house however this failed to have the desired effect and only angered the ghost of Nang more. After an unsuccessful attempt by the local shamen to exercise the ghost it was evident that they could not tackle the ghost alone as she was simply too powerful, such was her devotion to her husband, so it was decided to summon someone more powerful who could exorcise the ghost.

The countries most revered Buddhist monk was located and arrived to tackle the spirit of Nang. After many attempts by Nang to evade the monk he overpowered her spirit and she finally repented allowing her husband to break free of her and start a new life. The body of Nang was exhumed and the monk retrieved a piece of bone from the forehead of Nang's skull as this would destroy not only the ghost of Nang but also her soul. Her body was again laid to rest and the ghost of Nang disappeared.

The legend says that the piece of skull was made into a broach and worn by the monk until his death. It later arrived into the possession of His Royal Highness Prince Chumbhorn Ketudomsak and subsequently passed through the hands of many people. Today the whereabouts of the broach is unknown, but the sad story of Nang Nak continues to live on in Thai culture.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Location
Where you live
Expat From Country
Please select the country you originate from. This will appear as a flag when you make posts on the site.
Expat To Country
Please select the country you have either moved to or want to relocate to. This will be presented on the site when you make posts.

Log-in


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trade Me seller fined $45,000 for 'ghost' bidding anski Coffee Lounge 0 11th August 2011 01:01 PM
Becoming an ex-pat stories rj_usf Expat Media & Research Requests 1 27th May 2010 09:42 AM
Seeking for Interesting Stories about Thailand kalpattaya Thailand Expat Forum for Expats Living in Thailand 1 23rd August 2009 02:38 PM
Just for a laugh - SOUTH AFRICAN GHOST STORY Michele-In-SA South Africa Expat Forum for Expats Living in South Africa 2 25th March 2008 05:08 PM

FORUM PARTNERS

ExpatForum.com is owned and operated by VerticalScope Inc.

Retiring Overseas Guides | Moving Overseas Guides | Cost of Living | Health Care Guides


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.