NAATI CCL Hindi - My experience

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NAATI CCL Hindi - My experience


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Old 31st August 2019, 06:00 AM
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Default NAATI CCL Hindi - My experience

Hello fellow members

I had appeared for NAATI CCL Hindi test on August 21, 2019, in Sydney. By the grace of God, I was successful in the test with a score of 69 (34.5 in each dialogue).

Unlike PTE, as NAATI CCL is a test with minimal resources on the internet, I felt sharing my experience would be useful to anyone who is contemplating to take the test or is in the process of doing so. Hence this post.

1) Fluency is of paramount importance. Fluency means speaking at a constant pace, without unwanted pauses. Do not sacrifice fluency for the sake of translation. If you donít know the appropriate word in either of the languages, use the word as it is. Yes, use the word as it is in English or Hindi. This way you would ensure fluency is maintained. I had used at least 3 to 4 words in English as is without translating them to Hindi.

2) Accuracy and completeness of interpretation are the next two most important factors. Mistakes in these 3 factors - fluency, accuracy and completeness - have highest penalty. Hence ensure you do not make any mistakes or miss out any important aspects.

3) Donít fall prey to some coaching centres that charge you $800 or so for training. Also there are many people who sell materials on Gumtree and other forums. Again, do not fall into their traps. They share the same materials that are freely available in YouTube or CCL Tutorials app. You are better off practicing on your own. Especially if you are a native speaker or who uses Hindi on a daily basis. As I wasnít (I'm from South India), I needed some guidance. I took guidance from a person based out of India. Her coaching is very effective and charges are reasonable. Please message me directly if you want her contact email id. Please do expect some delay in responding.

4) Practice is the key. Keep practicing as much as you can with as many YouTube videos you can get hold. CCL Tutorials app also has some free practice dialogues. Make sure you record your practice sessions, analyse them critically, identify areas of improvement and ensure mistakes arenít repeated. Practicing in group or with a friend would help.

5) It is highly unlikely that any dialogues you practice will be repeated in the real exam. Hence focus on familiarizing yourself with the topic. This will ensure you are comfortable with the words associated with a topic. Whatever be the topic, my experience suggests that at max only 30% of the words would be specific to that topic. Rest all are common or generic words and are most likely to be present in almost all dialogues. Make sure you get these correct. So your preparation should be in such a way that you are ready to handle any topic, even those you are not familiar with. If you have not lived in Australia, some of the topics may appear strange or confusing. Do not be worried. Trust your preparation and interpret what you hear.

6) Identify the language which is your strongest suit. Make sure you maximise your score in this. For the other language, focus on minimising your mistakes. In my case, my strength was Hindi to English translation. Hence I tried to ensure that I made as minimal mistakes as possible, if not zero. During the actual exam, I took 1 repeat in each dialogue. Both of them was for Hindi to English as I didnít want to lose any marks.

7) Make sure you get factual aspects of dialogues correct. Such a period (week, date, month, years etc.), lists (list of documents), parts of the body(right/left leg or arm, back, head etc.). Mistakes in this will lead to inaccuracy or incompleteness in interpretation. Hence avoid mistakes.

8) Notes taking - donít practice noting down the entire sentence. It is practically impossible to do so. So the focus should be on writing down the key words and relying on your memory to connect the words to formulate a coherent sentence. Again, practice helps you here. Sometimes you wouldnít even need any note taking to translate, especially if you have very good memory and the segment is a short one.

9) Donít attempt to translate every word. Some words can be translated into a generic words. For example good morning or good evening. Translate these into simple "hello" in English and "Namaste" in Hindi. Similarly some words can be skipped instead of being translated. For example the English phrase "I'm afraid". If you know the right translation, please go ahead. Else, you are better off not translating as you would ensure that fluency remains intact.

10) Donít be unduly worried about the speed at which dialogues would be rendered during the exam. It isnít too fast. Heard that in some locations, candidates have a choice of using a headset. The center I appeared (Sydney) didn't have. So be prepared for both the possibilities.

11) Given that exam works on deductive marking,remember that you have a margin of at least 13.5 marks per dialogue. That is 30% of the total marks per dialogue. It is even more (16) if you can make it up in the other dialogue. This means that margin for error isnít too small. You have enough to account for minor mistakes as long as you minimise (if possible eliminate) errors related to fluency, accuracy and completeness.


12) Lastly, donít be nervous during the actual exam. You donít want a reason to make mistakes. I pretended as if I was doing a mock exam with my guide. The more relaxed you are , the less likely you will make a mistake.

Good luck to everyone with the exam as well as your journey to becoming a permanent resident of Australia.

PS: Above is my personal experience. Please do your own due diligence

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Old 1st September 2019, 06:08 AM
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Thanks for sharing. Good Luck

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Old 1st September 2019, 07:49 AM
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Thanks for sharing the details and all the best for your next steps.

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Old 1st September 2019, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hisumesh View Post
Hello fellow members



I had appeared for NAATI CCL Hindi test on August 21, 2019, in Sydney. By the grace of God, I was successful in the test with a score of 69 (34.5 in each dialogue).



Unlike PTE, as NAATI CCL is a test with minimal resources on the internet, I felt sharing my experience would be useful to anyone who is contemplating to take the test or is in the process of doing so. Hence this post.



1) Fluency is of paramount importance. Fluency means speaking at a constant pace, without unwanted pauses. Do not sacrifice fluency for the sake of translation. If you donít know the appropriate word in either of the languages, use the word as it is. Yes, use the word as it is in English or Hindi. This way you would ensure fluency is maintained. I had used at least 3 to 4 words in English as is without translating them to Hindi.



2) Accuracy and completeness of interpretation are the next two most important factors. Mistakes in these 3 factors - fluency, accuracy and completeness - have highest penalty. Hence ensure you do not make any mistakes or miss out any important aspects.



3) Donít fall prey to some coaching centres that charge you $800 or so for training. Also there are many people who sell materials on Gumtree and other forums. Again, do not fall into their traps. They share the same materials that are freely available in YouTube or CCL Tutorials app. You are better off practicing on your own. Especially if you are a native speaker or who uses Hindi on a daily basis. As I wasnít (I'm from South India), I needed some guidance. I took guidance from a person based out of India. Her coaching is very effective and charges are reasonable. Please message me directly if you want her contact email id. Please do expect some delay in responding.



4) Practice is the key. Keep practicing as much as you can with as many YouTube videos you can get hold. CCL Tutorials app also has some free practice dialogues. Make sure you record your practice sessions, analyse them critically, identify areas of improvement and ensure mistakes arenít repeated. Practicing in group or with a friend would help.



5) It is highly unlikely that any dialogues you practice will be repeated in the real exam. Hence focus on familiarizing yourself with the topic. This will ensure you are comfortable with the words associated with a topic. Whatever be the topic, my experience suggests that at max only 30% of the words would be specific to that topic. Rest all are common or generic words and are most likely to be present in almost all dialogues. Make sure you get these correct. So your preparation should be in such a way that you are ready to handle any topic, even those you are not familiar with. If you have not lived in Australia, some of the topics may appear strange or confusing. Do not be worried. Trust your preparation and interpret what you hear.



6) Identify the language which is your strongest suit. Make sure you maximise your score in this. For the other language, focus on minimising your mistakes. In my case, my strength was Hindi to English translation. Hence I tried to ensure that I made as minimal mistakes as possible, if not zero. During the actual exam, I took 1 repeat in each dialogue. Both of them was for Hindi to English as I didnít want to lose any marks.



7) Make sure you get factual aspects of dialogues correct. Such a period (week, date, month, years etc.), lists (list of documents), parts of the body(right/left leg or arm, back, head etc.). Mistakes in this will lead to inaccuracy or incompleteness in interpretation. Hence avoid mistakes.



8) Notes taking - donít practice noting down the entire sentence. It is practically impossible to do so. So the focus should be on writing down the key words and relying on your memory to connect the words to formulate a coherent sentence. Again, practice helps you here. Sometimes you wouldnít even need any note taking to translate, especially if you have very good memory and the segment is a short one.



9) Donít attempt to translate every word. Some words can be translated into a generic words. For example good morning or good evening. Translate these into simple "hello" in English and "Namaste" in Hindi. Similarly some words can be skipped instead of being translated. For example the English phrase "I'm afraid". If you know the right translation, please go ahead. Else, you are better off not translating as you would ensure that fluency remains intact.



10) Donít be unduly worried about the speed at which dialogues would be rendered during the exam. It isnít too fast. Heard that in some locations, candidates have a choice of using a headset. The center I appeared (Sydney) didn't have. So be prepared for both the possibilities.



11) Given that exam works on deductive marking,remember that you have a margin of at least 13.5 marks per dialogue. That is 30% of the total marks per dialogue. It is even more (16) if you can make it up in the other dialogue. This means that margin for error isnít too small. You have enough to account for minor mistakes as long as you minimise (if possible eliminate) errors related to fluency, accuracy and completeness.





12) Lastly, donít be nervous during the actual exam. You donít want a reason to make mistakes. I pretended as if I was doing a mock exam with my guide. The more relaxed you are , the less likely you will make a mistake.



Good luck to everyone with the exam as well as your journey to becoming a permanent resident of Australia.



PS: Above is my personal experience. Please do your own due diligence
How many days it took for your results? Official mention is 8-10 weeks. Looks like you got yours is couple of weeks, Is it correct? Thanks

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

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Old 1st September 2019, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by MN8 View Post
How many days it took for your results? Official mention is 8-10 weeks. Looks like you got yours is couple of weeks, Is it correct? Thanks

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
My results came in 8 days and I know a person whose came in 4 days. So it would depend. In general recent trend with Hindi has been that the result is shared within 1 to 3 weeks

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Old 2nd September 2019, 01:40 AM
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Originally Posted by hisumesh View Post
My results came in 8 days and I know a person whose came in 4 days. So it would depend. In general recent trend with Hindi has been that the result is shared within 1 to 3 weeks
Great. Thanks for the response.

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

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Old 5th September 2019, 08:19 AM
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Hi Fellows
can someone please elaborate, for what period NAATI CCL score is valid for claiming 5 points?
Thanks in advance.

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Old 5th September 2019, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by gurdeep001 View Post
Hi Fellows
can someone please elaborate, for what period NAATI CCL score is valid for claiming 5 points?
Thanks in advance.
The score is vslid for 3 years.

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Old 6th September 2019, 02:25 AM
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Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gurdeep001 View Post
Hi Fellows
can someone please elaborate, for what period NAATI CCL score is valid for claiming 5 points?
Thanks in advance.
The score is vslid for 3 years.
Thanks for the info

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Old 13th September 2019, 07:05 PM
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Can you please let me know if its possible to take NAATI CCL outside australia ? what is the alternative to this offshore folks ?

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