US citizen w/ U.K. children living in UK - View Single Post
View Single Post
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 21st May 2019, 01:20 PM
Bevdeforges's Avatar
Bevdeforges Bevdeforges is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: deepest, darkest Essonne
Posts: 47,445
Rep Power: 23345
Bevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond reputeBevdeforges has a reputation beyond repute
10269 likes received
1474 likes given

Users Flag! Originally from usa. Users Flag! Expat in france.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightermech View Post
No, they're not dual citizens. If I'm not mistaken they're UK. Maybe they can choose, but they're not dual citizens, that's quite clear to understand.
Afraid that simply isn't the case. Technically speaking, the kids are US citizens - because they have a US citizen parent who spent more than the requisite time resident in the US. What they don't have is US passports and that could prove "awkward" at least if traveling with Mom and Dad to the US. There is more information here: https://uk.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen...faqs/children/

A couple possible scenarios:
1. It is possible that the airline could refuse to board the family for the flight over, since the kids are US citizens (certainly in the eyes of the US government) and have no US passports.

2. It's fairly unlikely that on arrival in the US the Immigration officials would deny the kids entry into the US. However, they can make the entry process long and difficult (i.e. taking the family, just the US citizen parent and/or just the kids) aside for long and somewhat grueling questioning.

3. If, to avoid the problems, you have the kids pass through Immigration with their father, and let Mom go on her own through the "US Citizens Only" line, it might work. But, there are two caveats: First one is that for one parent to travel solo with minor children, they could ask for proof that the travelling parent has authorization from the other parent to remove the children from the country. The second one is that you (as the USC parent) could claim that you left the US too early to have the requisite time in residence to pass on US citizenship to the kids. The problem in either case is that I don't know what sort of "proof" they might require for either option and there is always the risk of getting caught in a "lie" to the Immigration authorities.

4. Or, it's entirely possible that no notice will be taken at all of the kids' potential US citizenship for whatever reason and you'll be admitted no problem.

With children as young as yours, I suspect the most likely scenario is #2, with a somewhat toned down "interrogation" - though with the stuff that is going on these days back there, I would be prepared for just about anything.
Reply With Quote