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Old 10th December 2017, 06:48 AM
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Users Flag! Originally from canada. Users Flag! Expat in philippines.
Default Learning to ride

I have never had a motorcycle license. Where I am from motorcycles are more a novelty than a serious form of transportation as we can only ride 4 or 5 months of the year. Also when I was 14 a 16-year-old friend was killed on his brand new Honda 350 so that sort of turned me off wanting to learn back then.

Since I am here and the economics of riding are a lot different, I want to get my license but more importantly learn to ride safely. (If that is really possible here lol). I intend to live in a province instead of a major city with the traffic.

I converted my license but was not given restriction #1 for motorcycles. I have looked on the LTO site and it is not clear what I need to do to honestly get my motorcycle endorsement.

Do I need to do a written test?
I am assuming I need a road test. What does that entail if done right?

I have heard the stories that sometimes an LTO will simply add it for you, especially if you don’t ask for a receipt for the “testing” fees but am asking what is the by the book answer.


Any tips on learning? I have seen lots of driving schools but most of them are for cars not bikes. Ideally, I’d like somewhere with a track to practice safe handling for a few hours before going on the road. I have a little riding experience, mostly on scooters and dirt bikes but not anywhere near enough to be considered competent and safe on the road.

I will most likely end up buying something in the 150 cc range that seems to be the most popular size around and should be enough for some freedom of mobility, especially in a province.
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