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Progreso, Yucatan - Page 3


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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 21st October 2012, 05:16 PM
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Thanks for your honest input, folks.

The weather -- extreme heat and humidity -- has been the major thing some expats (mainly in central Mexico or on the west coast of Mexico) have been criticizing about a move to the Yucatan. Whether we choose Progreso or Telchac Puerto, we will be very close to the beach and the Gulf. Pictures of the real estate we're looking at show flags blowing briskly in a breeze.

I have no problem with being up and about in the morning and in early evenings ... staying inside (or by the pool) during the hottest parts of the day.

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Old 21st October 2012, 11:25 PM
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Where you might choose to live is your decision and it's a good plan to visit and be flexible in that decision for many reasons. When your objective is to entice visitors to come and stay in your B&B, then there is more at stake and more to consider than just your personal likes and dislikes. I imagine many visitors might tolerate uncomfortable conditions to visit Merida and the surrounding area, but why vacation in Progreso and Telchac when the beautiful beaches and water of the Carribbean is so close by and those locations offer so little in the way of restaurants and shopping. I've been there to swim in the cenotes and to see what was there. The biting bugs were miserable (mosquitos, deer flies and horse flies) and the area was depressing. Definitely nothing I would be recommending to people back home or returning to for future vacations.

Sorry to be so harsh, but you're sold on spending a lot of money on your dream and you are not listening to these people. With any business, it's location, location, location. I have traveled quite a lot throughout Mexico in RVs, hotels, B&Bs and hostels. Tourists are different than expats and they are who you will cater to so visit Mexico and invest the time and money into researching an area with them in mind before you look at real estate. I wish you all the best for success in your endeavor.

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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 27th October 2012, 04:21 PM
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We have an oceanfront home about 35 k from Progreso along the coast near Telchac Puerto. For sure, it can be quite hot in the spring and summer (April to Sept. or Oct.), but like handling the heat anywhere, there are a few things you can do to mitigate it such as avoiding outdoor work and just relaaaxxing from 12 pm to 4pm on the beach or around the pool. Some expats travel elsewhere or visit home during all or part of these months, or if you are living in Merida, you do what the locals do and head to the beach (we know several expats who own homes in both Merida and at the beach. Just like many locals).
I agree with the poster who says that the flipside of the hot coastal areas is the cold highlands, where the winter temps routinely drop into the 40s and 30s F. We decided early on after considering San Miguel and Lake Chapala that we didn't want to spend our winters anywhere we would need a fireplace, heater or furnace. Why bother? We might as well stay home In chilly Canada if that was the case.
As for the rather nasty observation that the Progreso area -- make no mistake, it's a gritty, fishing / port town -- isn't as "pretty" as the Caribbean . . . well, that's certainly true if you dislike the authentic Mexico and want a fake, Disneyfied version of the country, which is largely the case in the areas around Cancun and some west coast locations in Mexico.
The advantages of the Merida / Progreso area are pretty obvious --- lovely oceanfront homes with a pool can be purchased for under $200,000, many of the major Mayan archeological sites are within a five minute to several hour drive away, there is a major city (Merida) within 35 km (drving on an eight-lane super highway between Merida and Progreso) with a broad range and type of decent restaurants, great health care and hospitals (I should know because I was forced to spend some time in one last winter), museums, art galleries and a thriving real-Mexico street scene. And if you want it, as well as local mercados and tiendas, there is also Home Depot, Sams Club, Costco, Wal-mart superstore and on and on.
Another great thing about it is that if you own and rent out your place, the summer months, when you might want to go elsewhere, is the high season for rentals. We get DOUBLE the rental fees in July and August that we would get in the winter when we are in-house. That is because Merida virtually empties in the summer and the residents flood to the cooler coastal areas. I know of no other tropical location where this happens and it suits us perfectly because we are back home in the summer months.
And if you simply want to rent in the winter, you can get an architect designed oceanfront beachhouse with pool starting at $500-a-week. Where else in the tropics can you find that?
Best of all, Merida and environs are inarguably the safest of the coastal cities in Mexico. Violent crime is almost unknown and yes, there is the occasional breakin, but relatively few.
As for the hurricane question --- it appears there have been more hurricanes / cyclones hitting Mexico's west coast in recent years than ours.
Because Progreso is on the northern tip of the Yucatan peninsula, it is not hit with hurricanes near as often as the southern (Chiapas, Chetumal) or easternm Caribbean coasts (Cancun etc). The hurricanes tend to blow themselves out as they cross the peninsula so by the time they get to us, they are done. Or they veer north to the US gluf coast or Florida.
In fact, in the past 30-35 years, only two hurricanes have hit the area, Glibert (1988) and Isadora (2001 or2002). Since then, nothing. We know that the odds are that at some point a hurricane will hit, but that's what insurance is for (we are fully covered for just a little over $1,000-a-year. Oh, and our property taxes on a three-bed, three-bath oceanfront pool home are $130-a-year).
We looked at places all over the Caribbean and Mexico in the hopes of finding a tropical hideaway and felt so lucky, honoured and privileged to have found this great place. Is it perfect? Nope! I'd like a couple of mountains (it's flat as a pancake), a little more jungle (we have scrub jungle, but not the lush kind) and more palms (yellowing off wiped them out, but they are coming back.) And the water gets churned up in the winter when the nortes (wind storms) hit. Although some winters (such as the last one) there are hardly any storms and relatively little rain.
However, on balance, we bought because we thought it was the best value in every tropical area we considered. And in the eight years since we bought, we have not wavered off that belief.
But don't listen to me or the naysaysers. Judge for yourselves. I suggest to anyone considering a move here to first rent as much as possible - mostly to see if you can deal with the summer heat - and spend a lot of time while there looking around and talking to expats. There are many beach communities east and west of Progreso, each with their own personalities and pricing structures.
I'm glad that those who decided to settle in Mexico's highlands and on the west coast are happy with their decision. So please don't diss mine. We thought long and hard about it and the Merida coastal area worked best for us and has also done so for thousands of other expats.

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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 27th October 2012, 08:39 PM
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Originally Posted by exclusiva View Post
We have an oceanfront home about 35 k from Progreso along the coast near Telchac Puerto. For sure, it can be quite hot in the spring and summer (April to Sept. or Oct.), but like handling the heat anywhere, there are a few things you can do to mitigate it such as avoiding outdoor work and just relaaaxxing from 12 pm to 4pm on the beach or around the pool. Some expats travel elsewhere or visit home during all or part of these months, or if you are living in Merida, you do what the locals do and head to the beach (we know several expats who own homes in both Merida and at the beach. Just like many locals).
I agree with the poster who says that the flipside of the hot coastal areas is the cold highlands, where the winter temps routinely drop into the 40s and 30s F. We decided early on after considering San Miguel and Lake Chapala that we didn't want to spend our winters anywhere we would need a fireplace, heater or furnace. Why bother? We might as well stay home In chilly Canada if that was the case.
As for the rather nasty observation that the Progreso area -- make no mistake, it's a gritty, fishing / port town -- isn't as "pretty" as the Caribbean . . . well, that's certainly true if you dislike the authentic Mexico and want a fake, Disneyfied version of the country, which is largely the case in the areas around Cancun and some west coast locations in Mexico.
The advantages of the Merida / Progreso area are pretty obvious --- lovely oceanfront homes with a pool can be purchased for under $200,000, many of the major Mayan archeological sites are within a five minute to several hour drive away, there is a major city (Merida) within 35 km (drving on an eight-lane super highway between Merida and Progreso) with a broad range and type of decent restaurants, great health care and hospitals (I should know because I was forced to spend some time in one last winter), museums, art galleries and a thriving real-Mexico street scene. And if you want it, as well as local mercados and tiendas, there is also Home Depot, Sams Club, Costco, Wal-mart superstore and on and on.
Another great thing about it is that if you own and rent out your place, the summer months, when you might want to go elsewhere, is the high season for rentals. We get DOUBLE the rental fees in July and August that we would get in the winter when we are in-house. That is because Merida virtually empties in the summer and the residents flood to the cooler coastal areas. I know of no other tropical location where this happens and it suits us perfectly because we are back home in the summer months.
And if you simply want to rent in the winter, you can get an architect designed oceanfront beachhouse with pool starting at $500-a-week. Where else in the tropics can you find that?
Best of all, Merida and environs are inarguably the safest of the coastal cities in Mexico. Violent crime is almost unknown and yes, there is the occasional breakin, but relatively few.
As for the hurricane question --- it appears there have been more hurricanes / cyclones hitting Mexico's west coast in recent years than ours.
Because Progreso is on the northern tip of the Yucatan peninsula, it is not hit with hurricanes near as often as the southern (Chiapas, Chetumal) or easternm Caribbean coasts (Cancun etc). The hurricanes tend to blow themselves out as they cross the peninsula so by the time they get to us, they are done. Or they veer north to the US gluf coast or Florida.
In fact, in the past 30-35 years, only two hurricanes have hit the area, Glibert (1988) and Isadora (2001 or2002). Since then, nothing. We know that the odds are that at some point a hurricane will hit, but that's what insurance is for (we are fully covered for just a little over $1,000-a-year. Oh, and our property taxes on a three-bed, three-bath oceanfront pool home are $130-a-year).
We looked at places all over the Caribbean and Mexico in the hopes of finding a tropical hideaway and felt so lucky, honoured and privileged to have found this great place. Is it perfect? Nope! I'd like a couple of mountains (it's flat as a pancake), a little more jungle (we have scrub jungle, but not the lush kind) and more palms (yellowing off wiped them out, but they are coming back.) And the water gets churned up in the winter when the nortes (wind storms) hit. Although some winters (such as the last one) there are hardly any storms and relatively little rain.
However, on balance, we bought because we thought it was the best value in every tropical area we considered. And in the eight years since we bought, we have not wavered off that belief.
But don't listen to me or the naysaysers. Judge for yourselves. I suggest to anyone considering a move here to first rent as much as possible - mostly to see if you can deal with the summer heat - and spend a lot of time while there looking around and talking to expats. There are many beach communities east and west of Progreso, each with their own personalities and pricing structures.
I'm glad that those who decided to settle in Mexico's highlands and on the west coast are happy with their decision. So please don't diss mine. We thought long and hard about it and the Merida coastal area worked best for us and has also done so for thousands of other expats.
You make some great points! I don't think that anyone is dissing your decision. Rather I think that most people, as with anywhere in Mexico, recommend going slowly and spending the time to see 1st hand what the environment is like. You seem to support this approach as well.

One difficulty as I'm sure that you know is that hard to reverse a decision if you've invested heavily.
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 8th November 2012, 04:50 PM
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Like Exclusiva, we also live on the beach about 35 km from Merida, in the small fishing village of Sisal. We are year round inhabitants, and have lived here for almost 7 years now, without air conditioning or a pool, and I can honestly say that only a few times has it been so hot that I've had to just lay in the hammock and avoid any action. We have ceiling fans in every room (including the kitchen and bathrooms), and a few stand fans as well. There's a lovely breeze off the Gulf of Mexico at least 99.5% of the afternoons that keeps at bay the stifling heat that folks living in Merida experience.

I bought my house during a 5 day visit to Merida back in 2005, and have never regretted the decision! The price was phenomenal for beachfront property, and even though we've had to do a lot of renovations on the property over the years, I am extremely happy with our home. The people here in Sisal are very nice, hardworking folks, and it's so peaceful living here. I always tell people who are thinking of moving here that it's not for everybody, as there's very little activity in the village, but Merida is close enough to afford you all the activity you could want, if that's your thing. I'm just perfectly happy enjoying the peace and tranquility of my house on the beach. That's exactly what I was looking for when I decided to retire to Mexico.

I agree 100% with Exclusiva. Come on over and rent a place (in Merida or one of the beach towns) for awhile, and look around until you find the place that “speaks” to you! When I bought my place, I drove the entire coast near Merida before deciding on Sisal. I like taking day trips to Progreso on “cruise ship day” because all the merchants are set up, and there's a very festive atmosphere, but for living, I didn't want to be in such a touristy location, with the hawkers on the malecon always after you to buy something. Besides the community atmosphere, I chose Sisal for the long beach in front of my property. It seems that some of the towns were losing their beaches, while Sisal has been gaining.

Wherever you ultimately decide to live, don't let the naysayers keep you from considering Yucatan, because not only is it the safest state in Mexico, but there's so much more to recommend it.

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Old 7th March 2013, 06:36 PM
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yep, I concur, Chicxulub is better than Progreso....prettier water, etc. I own a condo on the beach in Chixculub. Very nice.

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Old 22nd March 2013, 10:50 PM
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Hello. I am new to the forum and I don't know where you currently are in your move, but I LOVE Sisal. We have a lot in a nice gated community full of expats right on a nice quiet beach. We plan to build soon. We found a wonderful builder from the USA who lives there with his wife now. The community is so friendly and so helpful. It's nice to be around other expats, as well. Love to hear from you.

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Old 24th March 2013, 01:21 AM
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I have to ask, why the gated community? especially in little Sisal

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Old 24th March 2013, 03:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Sisal Dreamer View Post
Hello. I am new to the forum and I don't know where you currently are in your move, but I LOVE Sisal. We have a lot in a nice gated community full of expats right on a nice quiet beach. We plan to build soon. We found a wonderful builder from the USA who lives there with his wife now. The community is so friendly and so helpful. It's nice to be around other expats, as well. Love to hear from you.
The world seems to divide into people who want to live around other ex-pats and people who don't want to. I don't really understand what decides which camp people are in but almost everyone I have talked to is in one or the other. I can't remember meeting anyone who was indifferent on the question.

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Old 24th March 2013, 02:20 PM
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I have been in Chapala now for almost two months and I can only speak for myself. Coming from a small town on the East coast that was all Mexican and living on a property inhabited by a very small number of expats, I enjoyed both for five years. I knew that moving here would require much adaptation and that has proven to be true. It really helps if you know yourself well and moving into Catemaco proper was not an option personally. I'm never lonely and I could be happy with gardening, my computer, my family of birds and the TV , but I'm really to social to become that much of a hermit. Even though I miss my friends there, the choice to move here was easy. Now I'm surprised when I see so many Mexicans, on the bus, on the malecon in Chapala or at the tiangis on Mondays. There is no being a hermit here. Too much to do and enjoy. I accept that at my age, I'm not ever going to blend in with the Mexican culture and I do my best to speak enough spanish to show respect and be thankful for their uneasy acceptance of my presence here.

I am originally from Miami and I remember all too well the resentment we felt at having our city invaded by the Cubans. Now that city has been virtually taken over by people from many foreign lands and bears no resemblance to where I grew up. It is much the same here I'm afraid and being a part of it now does make me feel uneasy and maybe unwanted. You can make all the excuses you want to explain the attitude of entitlement, the complaints and the constant desire to change the culture of the Mexican people and the land in general, but here it is most definitely a takeover and is possibly less felt in gated communities. I'm sorry to have strayed so far off topic.

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