A list of things to do when you arrive - Parts 1 to 4

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A list of things to do when you arrive - Parts 1 to 4


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Old 25th February 2008, 02:23 AM
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Arrow A list of things to do when you arrive - Parts 1 to 4

Here's a list I flung together on what you need to do when you've landed in Australia. As I live in Victoria, it has a slant towards that State but the general gist is the same for all States.

I've had to publish this in 4 parts as it's quite long.
Sit down, get a cuppa, it's a long one!

Pick up a copy of "On Arrival" magazine at the airport; it contains lots of ideas, information and helpful websites.

Collect hire car and check into accommodation. Try not to sleep through the day.

Take a few days to get over the journey and explore the area.

Activate bank account
Set up a savings plan for emergencies, ie. Dental work, unexpected trips back to the UK etc.

Explore the area or suburb you think you would like to live in and ask the locals as many questions as possible

Guide to Public Transport (timetables for trains and buses)
Viclink - Your guide to public transport in Melbourne and Victoria

Arrange a house rental and start reviewing some accommodation property options.

When filling out application form, put at the top of the rental application form “recently emigrated from the UK and will offer 3 months rental in advance in cash”

Viewing days are often arranged rather than an individual viewing, most agents won’t let you come and pickup the keys and view a property straight away. They tend to have days where several interested people go along but they tend to have them every few days.

Build up a list of estate agents and their addresses, ask when calling if they have any other similar properties. They may not be that forthcoming so the best thing to do is drive to their offices, go to the front desk where they will have printed lists of all properties. Once you have these lists drive to the house and see what its like from the outside. If its good (and many aren’t) call the agent and find out when it can be viewed.

Its very exhausting but you can get maybe 3 or 4 viewed a day if you can get the timing right.

When you’ve found a rental:
* go through the inventory with the Rental Agent etc so any damages are logged down- be scrupulously detailed
* Take a video of EVERYTHING
* Turn on taps to see if there’s good water pressure.
* Check how much the water tank holds (160L for 3-5 people, 250L for 4-6 people)
* When moving in, make sure that all existing defects with the property are marked on a sheet with both you and the owner (or agent) having a copy. Ask the agent for the checklist used in final inspections and work from this. In particular pay attention to anything like carpet stains, wall marks, oil stains in garage, scratches on windows/mirrors, hooks on walls, etc
* If buying a plot of land, get a soil test done or put in an offer for land ‘subject to soil test’

Once you’ve decided which house you like, the agent will give you an application form, get it filled in (these are handed out at each viewing) and back to them asap. Now depending on the agent and the circumstances it may take only a couple of days to process and you then get the keys. Easy as that.

There may be a delay if the agent has to send your application to the owner who then takes a week to decide before saying yes or no. If there is a delay like that just carry on viewing properties until you know for sure if you have it.

Short term furnished rental
Short term furnished lets comprise of accommodations available to let for relatively short periods of time (e.g. weekly, monthly). Corporate let or serviced apartments and holiday lets would fall under this category.

A variety of standards are available, but usually they are relatively well equipped with everything you would expect to find in a basic house, such as kitchen equipment, furniture, and sometimes bedding and towels. They are often quite highly priced, but with the added convenience of a living layout (a full house or apartment all to yourself), rather than just a room, so you can just do your own thing. This often makes a particularly attractive proposition over a hotel to families with children. Some short-term furnished rentals include a weekly or twice weekly service where the living space is cleaned and the bed linen and towels replaced. Some are specifically for migrants, and will provide a food package and pick up from the airport on arrival.

A big advantage of this option is that, as with hotels, you can arrange it easily before you leave the UK, making one less thing on the to do list once you arrive.

Longer-term rental
In some areas, in particular inner city, rental properties are at a premium, so you have to be quick off the mark once they are listed if you find something you like. Be prepared to make a quick decision and have deposits and applications ready to roll asap or you could miss out.

Each agency has an application form which you will need to fill in, an example can be found here, http://www.raywhite.com/im/raywhite/...ion%20Form.pdf

The forms are unlikely to differ much from agency to agency, but you will need the form from the agency the accommodation is listed with. You should be able to get a form when you view the property, but if you are in a high demand area and want to be ahead of the game collect a few forms from each of the rental agents offices first. Some agents will require one application form for each adult living in the house.

Regarding documentation, most agents work on the 100 point check (like the banks) so you will need documentation to add up to 100 points. Take photocopies of the relevant documents with you so you are good to go. For a list of how many points your documents are awarded see here:

Document Points
Passport
(current or expired within past 2 years, but not cancelled) 70*
Birth Certificate 70*
Citizenship Certificate 70*
Australian driver's licence 40
Public Service Employee ID card 40
Social Security Card 40
Tertiary Education Student ID card 40
Mortgage documents 35
Letter from employer (current or within last 2 years) 35
A Rating Authority eg. land rates 35
Utility bill eg. electricity, gas or telephone 25
ATM card, credit card, bank book, bank statement 25
Council Rates Notice 25
Medicare Card 25
International driver's licence 25
Marriage certificate 25

* Only one of these can count towards your 100 points

You should also carry evidence of rent/mortgage payments in the UK or references from those companies.

Rent is often listed per week, and you are likely to be required to pay the first two weeks rent in advance along with a bond (deposit), which is usually four weeks rent. Some people find that due to their newly acquired zero credit rating, paying several months rent in advance is the best option.

Unfurnished rental
If you manage to find an unfurnished rental for the medium term soon after you arrive you will most likely be keen to move into it as soon as possible. If you decided to ship the minimum of personal items from the UK and are planning to buy new once you arrive in Aus then you can start your purchasing frenzy and furnish your new accommodation with everything you need immediately.

If, however, you have chosen to ship your belongings from the UK, there are a few options available to you:

Ship early and stay with relatives in the UK before you leave, so that your belongings arrive around the same time as you.

Buy the bare essentials that you could make do with for the weeks until your own furniture turns up.

Rent some furniture - furniture rental is a lot more common in Australia than it is in the UK, and can therefore offer a suitable short term solution for some. Below are a few Aus-wide furniture companies, and you may also find local companies in the area that you are moving to.

Furniture Rental and Relocation Furniture Hire Australia - Living Edge Furniture Rental
Furniture Rental Australia and Furniture Hire by PABS Furniture Rentals
PHD Rentals :: Furniture Hire Sydney & Brisbane Australia :: Electrical Appliance Rentals :: Car Rentals
Furniture Hire Sydney Appliance Hire Furniture Rental Appliance Rental Lounge TV Washing Machine DVD Dryer Sydney
Furniture Rental Australia. Hire Office Furniture, Rent Relocation Furniture, Rent Event Furniture Hire. Valiant Hire Rents Furniture Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane.

Others have found that they can get by with buying a few items to keep them ticking over until their shipment arrives. For example:

Garden furniture which can initially be used as a dining table. Airbeds which can be used for visitors in the future. Cheap kitchen equipment which can be purchased from Ikea, Big W, Target or similar. A small TV which can be used as the main one then moved to the bedroom once the shipment arrives.

Yard/garage sales also tend to be more common than in the UK and offer a good opportunity to buy temporary solutions at knock down prices.

Now go to Parts 2, 3 & 4 which incorporate buying a car, health insurance, australian school system etc

Dolly


Last edited by Dolly; 3rd January 2010 at 06:07 AM.
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Old 25th February 2008, 02:27 AM
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Default A list of things to do when you arrive - Part 2

Register for electricity/gas (online)

Some providers:

AGL :
AGL - Competitive gas and electricity rates - Request an Energy Offer

Red Energy : Red Energy - Supplier of Electricity to Homes in Victoria, Australia
TRUenergy: Electricity, Energy, Electricity Company, Energy Company - TRUenergy

Set up regular payments for utilities: may have to pay a deposit as you don’t have credit (approx $80).

Advise removal company of new address

Get a landline installed and set up internet access in your rental.
(find out who owns the line first).

Check out Whirlpool - Australian Broadband News for Broadband deals

Skype

You can use Skype or another VOIP (Voice Over Internet Provider) phone that you can plug into your computer - free international calls. Use an appropriate website or program (skype or messenger) and plug the phone in and your away.

If you get trouble with delays it could be your broadband provider or the phone or the computer or anything in between so make sure everything is in tip top condition - try your neighbour/friend/work computer to see if you can isolate exactly what the problem is!

Also, now available is a corded phone - VOIP CORDLESS phones that can be used anywhere in the house.

An alternative is to use phone cards. We use this one Go Beyond Phone Card and Go Beyond Calling Card

Daybreak Phone Card - International Calling Cards with instant pin delivery

Transfer driving licence

Overseas drivers - licences : VicRoads
(In Victoria, UK driving licence will only be valid for 3 months after arrival). Turn up with lots of ID, including your proof of residence in Victoria (i.e. rental agreement) and passport, etc.

VicRoads
71 Hartnett Drive
Seaford, Victoria 3198

Opening hours: Monday to Thursday - 8:30am - 4:30pm,
Friday - 8:30am - 5:00pm unless otherwise stated

Telephone number for all customer service centres : 13 11 71
(operating hours: 8:30am to 5:00pm Mon - Fri, 8:30am to 2:00pm Sat)

Go to Medicare. (you can only apply 7-10 days after arrival). You will be given a small slip, this will do until your Medicare card comes though. Also when applying ask about Medicare Safety Net and apply for that too http://www.medicareaustralia.gov.au/...y-net-work.pdf

Register with Centrelink: Centrelink are the government agency who deal with jobseeking and social security payments. They will be able to help you looking for work, getting your skills achieved external to Aus recognised, and seeking suitable training courses

Invite your neighbours around for drinks and focus on making new friends for us and our children.


Get a local mobile phone/SIM card
You can either buy a whole brand new phone or buy a new SIM to use in your UK mobile phone. Either way, you will probably need to opt for Pay as You Go for the first few months until you can get a credit rating in Aus.

If you are using a UK phone we will need to make sure it is unblocked before you can use a new SIM in it.

To buy a phone or a SIM card just visit the retailer of our choice. Most of them will have a store in most major towns, and we can locate them by visiting their website. Here are the main players:

3 – Three - Home
AAPT – www.aapt.com.au/
Optus – Optus - Welcome to Optus.com.au
Telstra – Welcome to Telstra.com
Virgin – Home – Mobile phones, great rates, free voicemail in Oz. : that’s Virgin Mobile Australia
Vodafone – Vodafone Home

You will need an address to register our Pay as You Go, however a hotel address or temporary address seems to suffice.

Ask about offers as they don’t always advertise them.

For more info about Aussie mobile phones and to compare networks try these sites:

Apply for a tax file number: you will need to fill out form 4157, which is especially designed for permanent migrants and temporary visitors with work rights. This should be completed online wherever possible, but you can’t do it until you arrive in Australia, and you must have a street address (not a PO Box) where they can send your TFN any time in the next 28 days.

iar.ato.gov.au/iarweb/default.aspx?pid=4&sid=1&outcome=1

If you are unable to apply online you can download the form from here:

www.ato.gov.au/content/downloads/nat4157.pdf

then post it to:
Australian Taxation Office
PO Box 9942
Moonee Ponds, VIC 3039

Buy a cheap scanner/printer: lots of paperwork involved in finding a rental (application forms have to be in asap).

Buying a car & getting car insurance

You will probably find that the Asian manufacturers are a lot more prevalent (and usually better value) than the European brands in Aus, and it often makes sense to choose them as the parts are a lot closer geographically should we have a problem.

You can often find success negotiating on price, whether we're buying privately or from a dealer.

To get an idea of prices check out the following links before we set out to buy, and as a comparison once you have a model in mind:

www.autotrader.com.au/
CarGuide.com.au - Let us make your new and used car search easy at Car Guide.
Used Cars - New Cars - Search New & Used Cars For Sale - carsales.com.au
Used Cars & New Cars for Sale | Car Sales | Car Reviews | drive.com.au
Red Book AU : Your site for New and Used vehicle prices

Victoria – RAC of Victoria RACT - Home

The vehicle should have a Safety Inspection Report (Pink Slip) – this verifies road worthiness. For more info visit the following link and select the authority for your region:

Registration & Licences - australia.gov.au

Once you have made the purchase you will need to transfer the registration (rego/green slip) to your name. You need to do this within 14 days of the purchase or you will pay a late fee. Standard rego is for 12 months, but if you buy a car it could be at any point through that period. For information on how to apply for the transfer visit the following:
How to register or transfer : VicRoads

If you are buying privately you can arrange for the motoring organisation in your area to check over the car for you before you buy for a small fee.

You will also be required to pay Goods & Service Tax (GST) on your vehicle purchase. GST works on a sliding scale so the more your car is worth the more the GST will be. Once you register the car you will receive a tax bill for it. The amount taxed will vary from state to state.

Some car dealerships:

Toyota Dealership, Camberwell (Cannon Toyota) 610 Camberwell Road, Camberwell 3124

Car City, 411-473 Moorondah Highway, Ringwood (car city, melbourne, dealer, used cars for sale, used car finance)

Booran Holden, Dandenong: Booran Holden - Dandenong's used cars for sale on drive.com.au Australia

Car Insurance

Registration (rego) includes a compulsory insurance, known as the Green Slip, to cover Injury to third parties. It covers the owner or driver of the motor vehicle in the event of an accident against any legal liability or obligation that they may have to anyone that they injure, it only covers personal injury and NOT damage to other property, cars etc. Most people take out insurance on top of this, similar to the cover they would have had in the UK.

Fully comprehensive insurance is usually cheaper than you would expect to pay for the same cover in the UK, and if you find the right company they will honour your UK no claims (make sure you brought evidence of it with you). You may not be required to produce evidence of your no claims to take out the insurance, but if you have an accident you are likely to be asked for it, so it is advisable to keep it on file.

AAMI - Car Insurance Australia - AAMI Car Insurance Quotes - CTP Insurance - AAMI
Budget Direct - Car Insurance Australia – Multi Award Winning Car Insurance and Online Quotes – Budget Direct
ING - ING Car Insurance
NRMA - NRMA Insurance - NRMA Motoring & Services
RACQ - rac.com.au/go/insurance/motor

Make sure we know the road rules

If buying a car from a dealership, they may sort out insurance for you

Now, go to Part 3!

Dolly
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Last edited by Dolly; 7th October 2008 at 10:04 PM.
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Old 25th February 2008, 02:30 AM
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Default A list of things to do when you arrive - Part 3

HEALTH INSURANCE

Many Australians choose to take out some form of private medical insurance, medical insurance companies are referred to as funds. There are a wide range of cover options available from a variety of suppliers.

The Australian government provide information about private medical cover on the following web pages:

www.health.gov.au/privatehealth

and the Private Health Insurance Administration Council (PHIAC) also provide information and advice including a booklet designed to help you decide whether to take out private medical insurance:

Private Health Insurance Administration Council (PHIAC)

If we have existing health cover in the UK get a copy of the contract as some Australian companies will accept a ‘roll over’ and not make you have a ‘waiting period’

Types of cover

Ancillary cover will insure for what are considered to be those basics that Medicare don't account for, such as dentistry, optometry, podiatry etc.

Hospital cover allows you to choose who will treat us and in which hospital we will be treated (public or private). Do not assume that our full hospital bill will be covered as the level of cover differs from plan to plan.

Government incentives

There are a number of Government schemes in place to encourage those who can afford it to invest in private medical insurance and thus relieve some of the pressure on the public health system.

The Medicare Levy Surcharge (MLS) is a surcharge of 1%, on top of the standard 1.5% Medicare levy on income, which is charged to high income earners who do not choose to take out private medical cover.

A rebate of 30% is offered by the Government on private health insurance premiums. Even if your employer has paid your premium you are still entitled to claim the rebate.

The Lifetime Health Cover incentive scheme aims to encourage Australians to take out cover early in life rather than in their later years when they are more likely to make claims. Taking out cover before the 31st July after your 31st birthday leads to reduced premiums for life. A 2% loading is added to premiums for every year after the subjects 30th birthday that the insurance policy is started. Migrants over 31 can participate in the Lifetime Health Cover scheme provided that they take out insurance prior to the first anniversary of the day they became eligible for Medicare.

Qualifying periods

Most funds have a system whereby for a specified period of time at the beginning of your insurance you cannot claim benefits. A health fund can pose up to a 12 month waiting period for hospital cover and a limitless waiting period for ancillary cover to account for pre-existing conditions which should have been picked up in a medical before you subscribed to the insurance. Health funds cannot refuse you cover due to a pre-existing condition.

If you have an accident after joining the fund the qualifying period does not usually apply

Membership categories

There are 4 types of membership category:-

Membership Cover
Single Cover for one person named on the application
Couple: Cover for contributor and one other adult
Family Cover for contributor, another adult + upto 2 dependent children
Single parent: Cover for contributor and upto 2 dependent children

Funds

Funds must be registered under the National Health Act 1953. The websites of some popular funds can be reached using the links below:

Medibank Private - choose medibank private for health cover and travel insurance
Health Insurance, Private Health Cover, Home & Contents Insurance, Private Health Insurance - Australian Unity
Health Insurance, Travel Insurance, Life Insurance, Retirement Solutions - MBF Group
Private Health Insurance, Private Health Cover, Health Care - HBA Health Insurance Health Insurance
nib health funds
Health Insurance Australia - ahm - provides Health Insurance, Travel Insurance, Health Management, OSHC, Corporate Health Cover and Overseas Visitors Cover
(check if covers dental)

Choosing a health care fund can be a daunting task due to the wide variety of plans available. A number of advisory bodies are available and they should be able to help is with our decision.

Private Health Insurance Australia - iSelect - compares five of the top fund suppliers packages

Health Insurance Australia - HICA - Offers advice on health insurance including a free online health insurance assessment

Australian Medical Association - Australian Medical Association - provides a checklist for comparing funds

Personal Finance, Shares, Money, Superannuation News - moneymanager.com.au - Sydney Morning Herald Money Manager - offers a clearly explained guide to how health care works in Australia

On the last leg, only Part 4 to go!

Dolly


Last edited by kaz101; 25th February 2008 at 03:29 AM.
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Old 25th February 2008, 02:32 AM
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Default A list of things to do when you arrive - Part 4

4th and final part!!

Register at a local school

To enrol a child(ren) in a school first telephone and make an appointment to enrol. You'll need to take with you: visa documents, proof of date of birth, hand over file from from their old school detailing their education to date, any reports etc. You may also be required to produce immunisation documents so check when you make the appointment or take them along anyway. Also, if there is a strict catchment area, you will be asked to provide a copy of your rental agreement.

The Australian education system

The responsibility for education is divided between State and Territory governments and the Australian Government, therefore situations will differ slightly from state to state so the info below offers a rough guideline only. For information on the area you are settling in please visit the relevant state education portal using the links below:

Victoria - Redirect Notice for the Department of Education and Training

School Type Age Grade

Pre-School 4 n/a
Primary School 5-12 Kindie/Prep to Y6
Secondary/High School 12-16 Yr7 – 10
College/High School 16-18 Yr11-12
University 18+ n/a

Sometimes secondary/high school and college run into one

Schools referred to as public are schools run by the state and not privately run schools as in the UK.

In most states school is compulsory between the ages of 6 and 15, through primary and secondary/high school.

The school year in Australia runs from late January/early February to December. With the exception of Tasmania who has 3 terms, all states have a 4 term year. There is a long summer holiday during December/January and a break of between 10 days and 1 month between each term. The school day runs from around 9am to around 3pm.

Subjects and Examinations

Primary school and the first four years of secondary school teach the core subjects such as Maths, English and Science, with elective subjects also becoming available in secondary school. Students in years 11 and 12 are encouraged to specialise in subjects of their choice. Students satisfying requirements for their final year will be given an overall grade which compares them with final year students in their state or territory. The results of this grade can help them get into university if they wish. Several schools are now offering the International Baccalaureate (IB) which is recognised in universities in other countries too.

Attendance requirements

Many schools have a uniform and it will be expected that your child wears a uniform if there is one.

Free lunches are not usually provided by state schools, there is often a canteen on site selling food and drink, although most students take their lunch to school with them.

School buses are not the norm for public schools, it is your responsibility to get your child to school.

Corporal punishment is not used in many schools across Australia - children are encouraged to respect their peers and teachers.

Some schools will require that your child's immunisation record reaches a certain standard.

Private schools

There are a wide selection of private schools around the country for a variety of budgets. There are also a lot of catholic schools which are usually private and often a lot cheaper than other private schools. As a general observation, private school fees in Australia tend to be lower than in the UK. The choice between state and private schools is a personal one and a constant debate.

If we decide to send our children to a private school in Australia there are regional independent performance rated lists available by searching on a search engine using private school rating and the area you are looking at as search criteria.

Have a list of questions covering the areas that we feel important, then we can ask the same things at each school and make an informed decision.

Many schools will ask us to wait until we arrive to register, but some will hold a place for us if you contact them and discuss our intentions in advance.

Find a doctor: some doctors bulk bill, which means that you don't get charged anything by the doctor - you sign the form at the end of the consultation and you pay nothing out of your own pocket. The doctor then claims your fee direct from Medicare.

You can visit any doctor we like and move around each time if we want to.

Find a dentist
Scott Robertson, Benton’s Square, Mornington or Mount Eliza Dr Scott Robertson, dentistry and information for all your dental needs in Mornington East, Victoria, Australia

Tom Byrne, Vale Street clinic, Mornington: (03) 5976 1176

Mornington Peninsula Dental clinic, 354 Main Steet, Mornington (Megan Healey) :
Dentist Mornington Peninsula VIC, Dental Clinic Mornington Peninsula Victoria, Dentists Mornington Peninsula, Dental Clinics, Cosmetic Dentists, Teeth Whitening, Fillings, Veneers, Root Canal, Crowns, Bridges, Implants, Orthodontist

Apply for Family Tax Benefit (Centrelink)

Visit a mortgage broker

House buying is fairly simple. Lots more properties are failing at auction, or being sold prior. If you want the house, you….

.* pay 10pct deposit

.* sign a contract (making any changes you feel necessary such as having a building inspection)

.* agree settlement date

.* hand over conveyancer/solicitor details

.* Wait for c/s to tell you how to pay, or what cheques need to be drawn up.

Move in!

Once a contract is signed, it is binding, unlike UK gazumping tactics!

Get a dog permit :

Application form:
City of Melbourne - Pets and animal management - Dog registration

To have a copy of this form sent to you, contact The Lost Dogs' Home on (03) 9329 2934.

The application form provides general information and outlines fees and payment options. New applications can be paid via mail or in person at the Melbourne Town Hall (90-120 Swanston Street or The Lost Dogs' Home (The Lost Dogs Home ) Gracie Street, North Melbourne

And the most important one of all.......

SPIDERS: Moretein bomb and then get pest control in too (no huntsmen’s in my house!!!). You can buy a pack of 3 cans of moretein. You open a can, leave one in each room of the house and then vacate the property for a few hours.

WHERE TO SHOP

When you first get here, you have absolutely no idea where to go for things (beds/TVs/toasters etc etc etc). So before we came over I trawled the t'internet and came up with the list below. Anyone with any other recommendations let me know and I'll add to the list.

This is a list I used when we first came over:-

Electrical Goods:

Good Guys
http://www.thegoodguys.com.au/portal...rtal/tggwebcms

Retravision
http://www.retravision.com.au/

Go-Lo
http://www.crazyclarks.com.au/

The Electric Discounter (online)
http://www.theelectricdiscounter.com.au/

Allied Appliance
http://www.alliedappliance.com.au/

Big Picture People
http://www.bigpicturepeople.com.au/

Harvey Norman
http://www.harveynorman.com.au/

JB Hi-Fi
http://www.jbhifi.com.au/

Myer
http://www.myer.com.au/

Furniture:

Freedom
http://www.freedom.com.au/

Domayne
http://www.domayne.com.au/

IKEA
http://www.ikea.com/au/en/preindex.html

Sydney’s
http://www.sydneys.com.au/

Fantastic Furniture
http://www.fantasticfurniture.com.au/

Supermarkets:

Coles
http://www.coles.com.au/

Safeway (Woolworths)
http://www.woolworths.com.au/

Beds:

Forty Winks
http://www.fortywinks.com.au/

Bedshed
http://www.bedshed.com.au/

Bev Marks
http://www.bevmarks.com.au/info/general/Home/get/0/0/

Snooze
http://www.snooze.com.au/bedding/default.aspx?show=all

Department Stores:

Adairs (on-line)
http://www.adairs.com.au/

David Jones
http://www.adairs.com.au/

Domayne
http://www.domayne.com.au/

kmart
http://www.kmart.com.au/

Myer
http://www.myer.com.au/

Target
http://www.myer.com.au/

BigW
http://www.bigw.com.au/

DIY

Bunnings
http://www.bunnings.com.au/

Mitre10
http://www.mitre10.com.au/

BBQ’s

Barbeques Galore
http://www.barbequesgalore.com.au/

Bunnings
http://www.bunnings.com.au/

Happy shopping!


Good luck to all who are at the start or in the process of moving over.

Dolly


Last edited by Dolly; 3rd January 2010 at 06:11 AM.
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Old 5th April 2011, 07:12 AM
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Thanks a lot for this list Dolly.

I'd like to know if I still need to apply for a tax file number when am using a working holiday visa to come?

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Old 5th April 2011, 10:39 AM
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Hi,

Yep, if you're going to be earning a wage, you'll need to get yourself a TFN.

Dolly

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Old 8th April 2011, 10:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dolly View Post
Hi,

Yep, if you're going to be earning a wage, you'll need to get yourself a TFN.

Dolly
Thanks Dolly, I am clear about that now.
vishal dhand likes this.

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Old 8th April 2011, 05:34 PM
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Thumbs up Good Information for new migrants

Hi Dolly,
I must admit that your informaton is too good for any new migrant.
Rgds
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Old 2nd May 2011, 05:45 AM
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really very good information

thanks a lot

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Old 14th May 2011, 12:36 PM
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indeed good info.
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